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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 13, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. :*-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oee year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 6.00
Per mouth, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. THURSDAY. FEBRUARY. 13. 1913.
THOSE MARCONI STATIONS
THE proposition advanced by the Marconi Wireless Telegraph
Company to establish a chain of powerful wireless stations
along the Pacific Coast, from Alaska to San Francisco, is
deserving of encouragement, and Juneau should have a station.
As a purely business proposition it would pay to have the extend
ed telegraphic connections that would be thus provided, because
cheaper rates than now obtain should be provided.
The equipment of a wireless station at the Jualin mine shows!
what might be expected with other towns and sections of the
coast supplied with these sta tions. They would be the means
of extending and facilitating business, and should prove a factor
in its development and extension.
The Empire is not familiar with the details of the Marconi
Company's plans, but from the information at hand it is as
sumed that the company proposes to extend its business to all
points which will warrant the erection and maintenance of their
service.
The murmurs of a big building boom in Juneau are being
heard in the distance.
THE MEXICAN MI DDLE
AS THIS is written it looks as if the United States may take a
hand in straightening out the tortuous conditions that now
exist in Mexico. For more than two years that country has i
been in a state of constant turmoil. The revolution, headed by
Francesco Madero, which culminated in the flight of President!
Diaz after he had held the country in a state of comparative tran
quility for thirty years, marked the beginning of a series of re
vollts that have been almost continuous. The country, as a re
sult. of these emeutes, for they have been scarcely more than
that, has, however, suffered severely. Business in many sec
tions has been seriously interrupted, if not entirely suspend-;
ed while districts both in the north and south have been laid
waste and agricultural interests of the country have suffered
heavily. And all this time President Madero has been utterly
unable to establish anything like a stable government. As a
soldier i nthe field his record seems to have been good; as a
statesman he seems to be utterly lacking in those qualities that
enabled former President Diaz to retain his hold upon the peo
ple. And if the lack of those qualities be conceded, it should not
be taken as a reflection upon Madero.
Diaz was a man of iron and he ruled the Mexican people with
a rod of iron. His was no velvet hand. The man who disputed
his autocratic sway was swept from his path, unless perchance
he had opportunity to flee the country. When Diaz, himself was
at last forced to flee he left a blood-stained trail behind.
Madero seems to have been built along gentler lines. It can
not be said, with truth, that he has been a bloodthirsty tyrant,
as witnesses his treatment of General Felix Diaz, the man who
is now disputing with him for the Presidential bauble. Diaz,
tried for treason in Vera Cruz, only a few months ago, was sen
tenced to death, but Madero failed to have the sentence executed
and Diaz was incarcerated in prison in Mexico City.
Intervention by the United States would be a matter to be
deplored, viewed from any aspect, save that of the welfare of
the suffering Mexican people, a comparatively few of whom, are
concerned in the sporadic brawls, revolts or revolutions, call
them what you will, that afflict a great and naturally rich
country.
Looks as though we shall also be required to do some police
duty in Mexico.
REFORMATION OF THE COURTS
A JUDGE of the Supreme Court of the State of New York de
clares that revolution of the courts impends unless the courts
purge themselves of outworn methods and thus quell the
merited impatience of the masses. All men are supposed to be
equal before our laws, but that seems not to be so. The road
to justice should be straight, short and simple. There should be
no toll gates on the way, no brigands, no false guidebooks. The
suitors traveling in automobiles should have no preference over
those who travel on foot. It is not well to scoff at the mutter
ings of the people. Judge Archbald could not have been im
peached twenty, or even ten, years ago, but the United States
Senate degraded him a few days ago with onlysix dissenting
votes.
Revolutionary methods, however, are to be avoided. The
recall of judges and judicial decisions promises no cure. Thf
movement should begin from within; it is well for the great jur
ists of the land, the Judges -of last resort, to take heed of the
temper of the times, unbend from their conservatism and work
out the reform themselves. Let us not deceive ourselves. Some
thing will happen. Unless the Judges act the people will act;
if they do not resort to the recall they will revise the Constitu
tion and create new courts.
Many decisions today record the views, not of the Judges
who sign them, but of Judges who lived centuries ago. The rule
of precedent dominates the rule of right. Expert testimony
is nearly always a farce. It is not dishonesty, but conservatisn
that weakens the courts?not venality but timidity.
The people are becoming impatient with discrepancies ii
justice, and they are demanding each day in a louder voice tha
there be reform. Our laws are becoming inadequate; they d<
not satisfy the popular conception of equal justice. And s<
the people clamor against the law, its delays, its discriminations
its inconsistencies. The thousands of statutes, rules, decisions
writs and unwritten laws, uncertain to the Judges, confusing t<
the lawyers and utterly incomprehensible to the people, consti
tute a condition almost chaotic. The huge bulk of the law passe
all human understanding. It should be reduced to a human com
pass. The laws will command respect only when they are worth:
of respect.
HI 11IIIII I I I I I I I 111 I I I I I I I I I I
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home ::j
Nothing adds moro to tho attractiveness of tho homo than \ ,
?^well-appointed table. It helps to make the homo the place , . j
home ought to be. And you would bo nurpriiied, perhaps. , , j
how much It adds to tho poaitivc relish of the meal. Wo , , ,
make It easy for you to supply your homo?little by little. If , .
you like?with a tasteful pattern of silverware. , ,
_These goods are up-to-dato and most reliable of any made , , !
Come end See Our
Silverware Department
UCHARICK
.J JEWELER
and OPTICIAN
I | 1 1 I I I I I ? I I I I I I I I I I >
Look for the Trade Mark J j | I
of the ' I
GORHAM CO. \
11111111111111111111111111 j
:: Northern News Notes
?1 I 1 1 1 11 1 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 1 I I I 1 1 MM- 11
It Is estimated that over 20 feet of 0
snow has already fallen at Stewart on
Portland canal.
... b
Charles Harrison, of Graham isl- a
and, picked 117 apples from his ranch
last year.
...
It is stated that the Canadian North
ern will be running trains across the
continent next year.
... "
Prince Rupert has been having a ''
coal famine recently.
? ??
O
Capt. Lionel Bennett was nominat
ed as candidate for the Yukon coun
cil for South Dawson by the Young
Liberal convention. Chas. Bessuyt
was chosen for North Dawson. The .
election takes place February 25. The ()"
Conservatives candidates are Dr. Rand
McLennan, for South Dawson, and
Howard Pearce. for North Dawson.
0 0 0
Since 1S81 there have been twenty
three executions in New Westminister. s
the hanging of Joseph Smith, a few ''
days ago, being the twenty-third. This
was the first hanging to take place at '
the penitentiary.
? * ?
The buzzer has been put on Sun- 1
day pool playing In Prince Rupert. ; ''
^ ^ #
Dr. I. H. .Moore, formerly of Douglas 'S
and Juneau, and Gus Stenfeld are tak-: ?
ing out a winter dump on Long creek.
Ruby district. 15
... h
The town of Ruby Is without a dep-,ll
uty marshal and Rubyites are doing
considerable kicking about it.
* * *
From the report of the quarter end-|
ing September 30. 1912, recently Issued j
from the marshal's office at Fairbanks. V
it is learned that the Iditarod term of t
court cost the government over $35.- f
000, which is In excess of the Fair- t
bank's term's cost for the same per- n
iod. The trial of Joe Campbell, the j c
Kuskckwim murderer, was responsi- I
ble for $10,000 of the amount. s
? * ? l
According to the Iditarod Pioneer .
the'gold production of interior camps
last year was as follows, by districts:
Iditarod (estimated). $3,250,000; Fair
banks district (including gold pro
duced from quartz), $3,894,991; Hot
Springs. $500,000; Gold Mountain,
$40,000; Bonnlfleld, $25,000; Kantish
na. $10,000.
? ? ?
Trout fishing is again becoming the
popular pastime at Skagway. With
the coming warm weather more fisher
men are going to the hills daily and
bringing catches.
? ? ?
James Bender, Alaska sourdough of
the early vintage, had his first auto
mobile ride, when he stepped off the
train from Chatanika, recently, where
he was met by a number of old Forty
mile friends with an automobile, the
first he had seen in real life.
ADVERTISED LETTERS
List of letters remaining unclaimed
in the Postofflce at Juneau, Alaska,
on Feb. 8, 1913. Parties calling for
them should call for "Advertised Let
ters," and give date of list
Anderson, John (3)
Betts, Goo.
Borden, Jack
Carden, Leland (2)
Clausen, Jakob (card)
Elstad, Johnny
Fritts. M. V.
Fukus, F.
i Hanse, Charles J.
Hansen, Johannes (4 cards)
Hendricks, James
Hudson, Thos. B.
isakson, Jo
Kells, P. J. (2 cards)
Kristensen, Fred
; Llebnecht, Geo. (card)
Lundstrom, Ludvlg (3)
Moore, Miss Ion (card)
Ogda, Miss Mabel
5 Petroff, Mrs. M.
) Pollock, R. J.
r Quam, Sven (card)
j Russell, M. A.
Smith, L. R.
Storm, L. W.
1 Turner, Miss Irene (2)
t Waves, Kosmus
3 Williams, Frank (card)
Yourke, J. H. (2)
E. L. HUNTER, P.M.
I
FEMMER & HITTER
J See this firm for all kinds of dray
- lng and hauling. We guarantee sat
5 Isfactlon and reasonable prices. Coa'i
delivered promptly. Femmer & Rlt
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones
402 or 403. ???
MUSINGS
Strategy Is merely finding out our
eighbor's faults before he finds out
urs.
? * *
It isn't only being able to pay the
ills for shoes and hats that enables
man to make both ends meet.
? * *
Time is money, which may be the
eason some people spend it so fool
jhly.
? ? *
We never fully appreciate happiness 1
ntil we reach the point where we look
ack on it.
? ? *
Nature's handiwork sometimes J
eems to need readjusting. The man
.?ith the biggest heart generally has
he smallest pocketbook.
? ? ?
The worst thing about giving advice
i that you so often have to take i(
ack if it's damaged.
ABOUT PERSONS
Carl Dietsch. of Kalama, Wash., has.
ucceeded In producing a seedless
rune.
Wolf Jacobs, 102 years of age, of
few York City, is under medical care
or the first time In his life.
David Fisher, aged 101, Frankfort,
nd., complains that his hearing has
egun to fail.
T. A. Rhelnhart, of Salem, Ore.,
hate land agent, urges abolition of his
dice. Says it is useless.
Luther Burbank, Santa Kosa, Calif.,
lant wizard, is preparing to retire,
avlng sold is entire business to a syn
icate.
>IRS. CLEVELAND WEDS
PROFESSOR PRESTON
PRINCETON, N. J., Feb. 11.?Mrs. j
'ranees Folsom Cleveland, widow of
be late President Cleveland, and Pro
essor Thomas J. Preston, of Prince-'
on University, were married last
light at the home of the bride in this
ity. President John N. Hibben, of
'rinceton University officiated. Mr.
ind Mrs. Preston will spend their j
loneymoon in Florida.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah. Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m.. Nov. 5, 11. 17. 23. 29.
Dec. 5. 11, 17. 23. 29. Jan. 4. 10,
16, 22. 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11. 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23. Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin. El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9. 15. 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21. 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13. 19, 25. March
3. 9. 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOW ELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
?127 Walker Building, Seattle
After Murch 16th at Room 6, Alaska
Steam Laundry Building
The Emp ire
I
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
|MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT ? The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND
SOUTHBOUND
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle O/Jlce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
t i.
f ? ALASKA j
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Sufoly, Service. Speed Ticket* to Seattle, Tncomo. Victoria ami Vancouver. Through *j*
? ? ticket* to Sun Frnnci*co T
!! NEXT BOAT SOUTH?MARIPOSA FEB. 12 -j.
!! JEFFERSON Northbound FEB. 11 Southbound FEB. 12
!! NORTH WEST'N " FEB. 12 Southbound FEB. 18 ]?
" Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. I
?i-i-H-H-I I I I 1 I'-l-M I-! I 1 ?! I 1 I 1 1 1 I I II I-I-l- 1-1--I I I I II I 1 I I 1 I ?!??!?
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Pert Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swanson, Alert Kay, Vancouver
Victoria und Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 13
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J T. SPICKKTT. Agt. J
II M t II I I I I I I I I I I 1 I i I I II I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
ii ALASKA COAST CO. ::
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, . .
!! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
!! S. S. YUKON ? ? - FEBRUARY 4 ||
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ||
connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports ||
;; S. S. YUKON - . ? ? FEBRUARY 14 ?'
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
|| For further information apply to
|; S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ;;
'iii? 11111111111111 ii 1111111111 a 1111111111111111
P A C I F I C COAST S T E A M S H I P CO. %
? steamers for ?
SEATTLE, TACOMA, |
? Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, ?
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, J
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. J
% C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ?
T 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle *
? ^ ^ C * NORTHBOUND FEB. 16 *
? Curacao southbound feb. 17 ?
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ?
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukIak and
Tread well
*8:00 a. ir..
9:00 a. n:.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. in.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. ni.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. |
12:00 noon
1:40 p. in. j
3:25 p. in. j
4:55 p. in.
6:55 p. in.1
8:25 p. ni.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
LcaveH
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
! 9:30 p.m.
I 11:30 p. m.
I>*avon Juneau daily
for Sh^'li Creek
] 11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
ii Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
|| 5:10 p. m.
From Juneau lor
Sheep Cre?4v
Saturday Nitfht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. ru.
Sunday Schedule same us above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. is omitted j
L.
?H-H-M-H-HLH 1 I 1 1 I I I 1 I I I I'M-H-i-H I I I i i i-i-i i i i i i ? .
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX J
'Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan **
i; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA II
^-i+H-i-1' 1 1 ?i"i"l"H*'I"l?Iiili r i-D-I -I-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
i: We Are Headquarters for j
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING |
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS j
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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