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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 14, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered an aecond-clasa matter November 7, 1912 at tho poatofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 14, 1913.
POWERS OF THE LEGISLATURE
THE powers that may lie in the Territorial Legislature seem
to be a debatable question. At any rate there seems to be
a wide divergence of opinion as to the powers that may
be exercised by that body further than to memorialize the Con
gress. Lawyers who have examined the act creating the legis
lature do not agree as to the limitations popularly supposed to
be placed upon it. However, it may be presumed that the legis
lature will set about enacting such laws as they think are need
ed, and pass them up to the President and and the Congress to
determine whether they have exceeded their powers.
The members from the Fourth judicial division, we are told,
have already, in their ''mind's eye," some subject matter that
should be whipped into good law. These embrace:
A tax on foreign corporation.
Amendment of the road law.
Amendment of the banking law.
Amendment of the incorporation act for the incorporation
of companies.
Amendment to the mining laws with regard to record and
what shall constitute annual assessment work on mining claims.
Care of indigents.
Amendment of the election laws.
Small debt court.
Tax on transient traders.
Amendment to the criminal code regarding notaries.
Penalty for passing checks when drawer has no funds in
bank.
Appointment of a mining inspector for each division.
Revision of the Alaska code.
Creation of the office of superintendent of public instruction,
defining who shall be teachers.
Quite a respectable list indeed from the Fourth. If the
other divisions do as well the first territorial legislature promis
es to have a busy time.
The large increase of business made during the past two
years by the First National bank of this city, speaks well for
the growth of this section and the careful management of that
institution. The bank's deposits have doubled and its profits
rose from zero to $:> 1.000. And its growth during the next year
will undoubtedly be much greater.
ALASKA RAIROAD DEVELOPMENT
THE latest news from Washington indicates that the Govern
ment. under the leadership of President Wilson, may final
ly undertake railroad development in Alaska, says the Se
attle Sun. Once this policy has begun, it will probably be con
tinued until the whole territory is made accessible by rail. It is
but a few short years ago since that northern region was looked
upon as inaccessible, never to be developed except in a superficial
manner, by the miner and prospector.
No one believed that there would ever be a railroad north
of the Canadian Pacific, yet within the last two years, we have
seen two trans-continental lines rapidly pushing their rails across
British North America far into what was at one time supposed
to b efrozen wilds, and one of them getting ever nearer towards
Alaska.
It is interesting in this connection to recall a book that was
published forty years ago predicting the ultimate construction
of an international railroad from Winnipeg and through Alaska
and connecting at Bering Straits by tunnel or bridge, with a
trans-Siberian line, continuing onward towards Moscow and St.
Petersburg.
The writer of this book was looked upon in his day as an
idle dreamer, yet he was perhaps a seer with clear vision. It
will take but little more gridironing to the Northern wilderness
to bring about the realization of his dream insofar as the Amer
ican side is concerned.
On the Asiatic side, engineers have recently pushed their
way up from Vladivostock, Siberia towards the Straits investi
gating topographical conditions with an idea to railway construc
tion. The day may be approaching when, with advancing pop
ulation and enterprise, the inter-continental railway will become
a reality.
Although the elections were held on November 5, the Pres
ident and Vice President of this nation were formally elected
only yesterday.
MEXICO AND THE MONROE DOCTRINE
WITH the United States on the point of intervening in Mex
ico, comes to mind once more the Monroe doctrine, which
in effect, constitutes this nation the protecting power of
the American continent. There also arises the question whether
the Monroe doctrine is as beneficent as it seems. No doubt at
the time it was promulgated by President James Monroe it
served its purpose well, and continued to do so for many years.
But with the lapse of time its sphere of influence seems to have
been extended rather than diminished. In the beginning the idea
that no European or other foreign power should obtain a foot
hold in America was no doubt sound. But in the time that has
elapsed numbers of independent governments have been estab
lished. and have become permanent and stable. The fear of for
eign encroachment has long passed, and today there is not even
a remote possibility that a European or Asiatic nation could, or
would, attempt to set up a colonial government on the soil of
either of the Americas. It is occupied by its own people and
could only be taken from them by a war of conquest?some
thing not within the bounds of reason.
And yet, as a direct result of the Monroe doctrine, the United
States may find itself compelled to enter Mexico with an army
and bring order out of chaos. The precedent has been estab
lished. It was done in San Domingo and very recently in Nica
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I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I II H
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ragua. There have been three occupations of Cuba and there
may be more. And if Mexico be added to the list our troubles
will be multiplied, but, without doubt, Mexico would be the
gainer.
When the United States assumed policing powers over the
little swarm of Central American republics trouble was invited,
to say nothing of the burden of expense that was added to that
i of the American people. Of course if Mexico should be occupied
by American troops that burden would ultimately have to be
: borne by the Mexican people, already impoverished because of j
internecine warfare and misgovernment. The beneficent effects
of the Monroe doctrine are jug-handled. The protected reap
whatever advantages that accrue, while the protector pays the
piper. The Monroe doctrine has not added to our commercial
prestige, or extended our trade
The commercial relations of the countries under our protect
ing wing are much more extensive with European nations than
with the United States. In other words, we have the glory,
those get the profits.
The Monroe doctrine needs revision?either upward or
i downward.
1 I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I ! ! I I M 1 I 1 I 1H
II Northern News Notes
I I 1 I I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 I I I I I I' !? l11!11!"!"!11 ?
The measles epidemic at Metlak- |
hatla and Saxman Is abating.
? * ?
Ketchikan is improving its fire
alarm system.
? ? ?
No trace of the missing fisherman
Jim Short, has been found though his ;
boat was picked up adrift between
Onslow island and Meyers Chuck. It i
is believed that Short periBhed in a ]
storm. i
? ? ?
The Lindenburger Packing Com- :
pany's cannery tenders Berlin and Or
ient have been sent from Ketchikan
to Seattle to be overhauled.
? ? ?
Geo. Redmond, who was severely
frozen early in January while enroute
from the Teslin lake strike had the
toes of one foot amputated at St. An
drew's hospital at Atlin, last week
and will undergo an operation for the
other foot in a few days.
? * ?
The Telegraph creek mail carriers
are having considerable difficulty this
month in getting the mail through.
When but a short distance from Atlin
the dogs got their feet wet and were
consequently frozen, the temperature
being forty degrees below zero at the
time. After some delay fresh dogs
were secured and the journey re
sumed. On account of the great depth
of snow and mildness of weather, it
is impossible to cover more than an
average of ten miles per day.
9 m m
The Dominion telegraph station at
Tagish was burned a few days ago.
The men in charge of the station es
caped with their lives, but lost all
their clothing and supplies.
? * *
Frank Palmer, engineer of the
steamer Bertha, was fined $100 at
Skagwayq for assaulting Assistant En
gineer William Kennedy.
? ? ?
The Skagway baseball team had its
first practice this year on Feb. 9. Last
year the first practice took place In
March, therefore the Daily Alaskan
concludes that Skagway's climate is
getting milder.
? * ft
Skagway is rejoicing in securing un
limited quantities of Northfleld coal,
mined at Departure bay. It is free
from dust and rich in bitumen.
? ? ?
Dr. Thompson M. P. for Yukon has
asked for an allowance for the wife of
the late Governor Ogllvie who was
commissioner of Yukon Territory in
1898-99. Mrs. Ogllvie is a sister of
Colonel W. P. Richardson. Mr. Ogllvie
was not a wealthy man when he died.
GOES TO BABYLON
2185 B. C., FOR LAW
The legal code of the great Babylon
King Hammuraji, who died 2185 B. C.,
is one of the authorities on which
Judge Muench, of the circuit court of
St Louis, Mo., bases a decision by
which he dismissed the action of 8
year-old Louis Bernero to set aside
the will disposing of the $1,000,000 es
tate left by Mrs. Theresa Bernero, who
died July 15, 1911.
The boy is the son of Emanuel Ber
nero, adopted son of Mrs. Theresa Ber
nero and her husband, Louis Ber
> nero. The suit was brought -by his
mother, Mrs. Lorraine T. Bernero, of
St. Louis, as best friend.
Judge Muench's decision is that the
child of an adopted child has no rights
as an heir after the adopted child is
dead. The relation of the grandchild
to the adopter is contradictorial. he
holds.
This is the first time. Judge Muench
says, that this precise point has been
adjudicated in Missouri. Arguments
in the case were made two months
ago and the court has been consulting
legal authorities ever since to get a
basis for the decision.
SIX-FOOTER AT 13,
STILL GOING UP I
? i
CONNELSVILLE, Pa., Feb. 14. ?
Somersett County, this State, has a
thirteen-year-old boy 6 feet 6 inches
tall and still growing. For two years
he has, been wearing long trousers, ?
and his fond parents are puzzled what
to do with him, because he outgrows
his clothes before he outwears them.
He is well developed and strong and
weighs in the neighborhod of 200 j
pounds. Altohuhg normal at birth and j
when a child, within the past two
years lie began to sprout up to an enor-1
mous height and a special bed was
constructed before he could obtain I
rest.
Young lady wants position in office
where there is a chance for advance-;
ment. Address Room 15, Occidental ;
hotel. 2-12-3.t
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m? Nov. 5. 11. 17. 23. 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23. 29, Jan. 4, 10.
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9. 15. 21, 27.
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
. Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21, \
March 17.
Leaves Juueau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15. 21. 27, Dec. 3.
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the .
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL. MANAGER
?
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY "
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
127 Walker Building, Seattle
After March 15th at Room fi, Alaaka
Steam I?aundry Buildimr
Phe Emp ire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. !
The Alnxkn Flyer S. HUMBOLDT The AUflka Flyer
NORTHBOUND
SOUTHBOUND
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
I I I II I M I- H ?MM' I M I I I I 1 I I 1 I 1 1 1-1 ?!
? ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety. Service. Speed Ticket* to Seattle. Tare ma. Victoria and Vancouver. Throuich
? ? tickcta to Sun Kranciiico
I! NEXT BOAT SOUTH?MARIPOSA FEB. 12
I! JEFFERSON Northbound FEB. 11 Southbound FEB. 12 .j
I! NORTH WEST'N " FEB. 12 Southbound FEB. 18 -I
I
II Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. X
?!-H-l-H-H-? I?? 1 ? ? I? ? 1 ? ? 1 ? ? I? ? H-HH-HH-l? ? I ?l-l-l I 1 I 1 I I I T I 1 I I I I 1 I- l l 1 I I I I !? 1-1
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juncuu for Port Simpson. Princo Rupert. Swannon. Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 13
Front und Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKKTT. A*t.
I I M I I i I II I I II I M 1 I I 8 I I I II I I I I I I I l? I I I I I I II I I M II I I I
I ALASKA COAST CO. ::
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ..
!! Seldovia?SAILS Ff^OM JUNEAU ||
? !! S. S. YUKON ? ? ? FEBRUARY 4 I I
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
|| connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports ||
|| S. S. YUKON - - ? - FEBRUARY 14
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? |
II For further Information apply to ' |
|| S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ||
I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I II H
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP C 0. f
? STEAMERS FOR ?
| SKATTJ.K, TACOMA, *
? Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, ?
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, ^
o Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. f
j C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ?
^ 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle ?
SO p NORTHBOUND FEB. 16 J
? O. Curacao SOUTHBOUND FEB. 17 ?
i O Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ^
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DuukUix and
Trend well
*8:00 a. in.!
9:00 a. m. |
11:00 a. m. |
1:00 p. m. ]
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
! Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. ra. I
9:25 a. m. |
12:00 noon
1:40 p. in.
3:25 p.m.
4:55 p.m.
6:55 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
9:25 p.m.
111:25 p. m.
leaves ,
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. j
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
[/?avc.s Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. ra.
From Juneau for
Sheci> Creek
Saturday Nitfht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same as above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. ia omitted |
?! I I I 1 1 I I I I 1 I I I I K ! I H-M-H-t I ?! 1 I II 1 I I I I M l i' i
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
*! Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan J
f ;; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU. ALASKA II
?? I ?? I ?11 !? 1 I I I I 1 1 1 1 M I M 1 II M II I I M H -1 !? I I I 1 I I I I 1 I I 1
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
????????^J
.MM.......MM
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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