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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 15, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
? J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. .">-7-1
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 15. 1913.
FILLING FEDERAL OFFICES IN ALASKA
t X THE filling of federal offices in Alaska under the Democrat
1 ic Administration, it may be well for the Democrats of the
Territory to bear in mind that there is real danger that a not
inconsiderable number may go to rank outsiders. While it is
true that the Democratic national platforms, of the past eight
years, have not only favored home rule for Alaska and have al
so contained declarations that the federal offices in Alaska should
be filled by bona fide residents, it need not be taken for granted
that the latter dictum will be strictly adhered to. This will be
true especially if unseemly wrangling shall ensue between can
didates for the various offices; for if there be not some degree
of harmony it might well be that the President would ignore
the Alaskan and send a man with a carpet-bag. This statement
is not idly made. Already there are known to be a score or more,
of men in the States widely separated, who are aspirants for ap
pointments in the different judicial divisions, and they will be
backed by strong home influences, by Senators and Representa
tives in Congress who have votes and who, naturally, are desir
ous of helping their constituents to office in return for services
rendered. Alaska is looked upon with favor by the Outside seek
er after office. It is to him an alluring field, because, he thinks he
may find there wider opportunities for personal advancement
and success than he can find at home.
While The Empire hopes that every declaration of the dem
ocratic national platform will be carried out, as far as possible,
in the utmost good faith, there is always a chance that an un
infiuential. and hitherto much-neglected mere Territory will not
receive even-handed justice, not only in the matter of filling of
fices, but in others much more -mportant.
This is not a matter of individuals. The individual is noth
ing: the welfare of the people of Alaska, the maintenance of
wise and progressive government, and the legitimate develop
ment of the resources of the Territory are everything.
As far as the appointments to office are concerned, The Em
pire has no axe to grind, and no favors to seek. It is not doing
so. and it will not. Its position on all matters of vital interest
to the Territory is known in all the four divisions. Home rule
for the people, better laws, freer opportunity, the development
of the country, have been advocated consistently for many
years. Alaska for Alaskans has been its shibboleth. It is now,
and it will be. In the days when carpet-bag government was
the rule: when office after office was filled by Republican Pres
idents with outsiders, this writer took the same position that is
taken today. Then it was said that there were "plenty of good
Republicans in Alaska to fill every office within the gift of the
Administration, and to fill them with credit and efficiency."
The Empire takes the same stand with reference to tne Dem
ocrats of Alaska. There are enough Democrats in Alaska to fill
all the federal offices without importing a single Democrat car
pet-bagger. And it wishes to emphasize the statement in the
strongest possible manner, so that it may be understood of all
men?especially Alaskans?be their political affiliations what they
may. that this it not, with The Empire, a matter of individual
choice, selection or preference, but a matter of living principle,
for which it will continue to fight until Alaska shall have a gov
ernment of Alaskans, by Alaskans and for Alaskans.
The Seattle Sun, Seattle's new evening paper, has grown so
rapidly in popular favor that in less than ten days from the
time it was started, it has had to refuse advertising and, with
its present mechanical equipment, it cannot meet the demands
of its circulation. The Sun is a clean, up-to-date newspaper, and
that it is filling a "long-felt want" is shown by its phenomenal
instant success.
It may have been noticed that the war between Madero and
Diaz in the streets of Mexico has overshadowed the Turk and
the Bulgar in Adrianople and the Gallipoli peninsula.
SPEAKING OF OYSTERS?
THE political enemies of Woodrow Wilson have criticised him
sharply for many of his public utterances. Some of them
have told him with brutal frankness that he talked too much,
but this hostile ebullition was evoked because they lacked sym
pathy with the subject matter of his remarks. But the Pres
ident-elect has shown in a most direct and unmistakable man
ner that he can keep his own counsel. A legion of newspaper
men have assailed him daily for weeks past in attempts to get
a line on his Cabinet selections. They have utterly failed. Often
their questioning has been so direct that it bordered upon the
edge of impertinence, but with rare good sense and tact Mr.
Wilson seems to have understood the reason for their pertinacity,
and he has always replied suavely without divulging, however,
the slightest information as to the personnel of the men who
will make up his Administration And yesterday he was quoted
as saying that he would follow the good, old-fashioned meth
od and not make any announcements until the names of the mem
bers of the Cabinet are sent to the Senate. And he probably will
not. though there is scarcely a doubt that he has settled the
matter with himself and probably with the men who will form
his official family. But such extreme reticence as this, is not
particularly pleasing to the Cabinet-making guild. They are
left with the privilege only of hazarding mere guesses, while the
public are only interested in the actual timber.
Even Vincent Astor, hundred-millionaire, is going to get
back to the soil. This fact may give farming a boost among
the idle rich.
Within seventeen days his critics will probably know Gov
ernor Wilson's choice of a Cabinet, but by that time they will
have thrown pretty nearly all their missiles.
This is no piping time of peace?in Mexico.
111111111111111II111111111111111111'
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home :: j
^Nothing adds more to the attractiveness of the home than , ,
a! well-appointed table. It helps to make the home the place , ,
homo ouffht to be. And you would bo .turpriwd. perhaps. , ,
how much it adds to the poeitivo re I in h of the meal. We , ,
make it eany for you to supply your homo?little by little, if , ,
you like?with a tasteful pattern of silverware. ? .
_ These Roods are up-to-dato and most reliable of any made , ,
Come end See Our
Silverware Department
I I CHARICK
I J jeweler
and OPTICIAN
I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I
Look for the Trade Murk , \
of the 1 1 (
gorham co. ! |
THE REJUVENATION OF PORFIRIO I
IN THE name of the prophet, figs! Here's the venerable Por
firio Diaz, some time dictator of the bleeding Mexico, now an
exile from his country, who notwithstanding his eighty-odd
years, in the best approved swashbuckling manner announces
from his easy chair in gay Paree, that he will put on his shield
and his buckler, return to Mexico and take the field against
the United States in case of intervention. And if he should?
Confusion in Mexico might become worse confounded., There
is, no doubt, some fighting blood still left in the veteran former
president, and many Mexicans might rally to his standard, but
he ought to know that he would wage a hopeless fight, and bat-,
tie for a cause already lost, should the United States enter Mex- i
ico with hostile intent, which heaven forfend.
Instead of breathing war and slaughter this aged veteran
of many bloody fights would better counsel peace and unifica
tion for the people over whom he ruled so long.
General Felix Diaz wants to be recognized as a belligerent.
Certainly Felix is not a molly coddle.
I
BILL FOR DOG
TEAM PRESENTED
Deputy Marshal Whittlesey, of
Seward, Asks Money for
Novel Transportation
CHICAGO. Feb. 15? A man.
bundled in a big fur coat,
walked into the United States
district attorney's oflice here to
day and laid down this bill:
"157 miles by dog team?$15.70.
"3.S96 miles by rail?$389.60.
"Total?$405.30."
He is William Whittlesey, at
torney and United States depu
ty marshal at Seward, Alaska,
who came here to testify in a
government suit. Never before
had the Chicago oflice been
called on to pay a bill for trans
| portation by dog team.
* *
1 I 1 1 1 M I 1 1 I 1 I I 1 1 M i i I 1 i I I
:: Northern News Notes
i i i i t i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ; i
The Canadian-Klondike Mining Co.
is moving many tons of mining ma
chinery from Whithorse to Dawson.
Horse teams and a caterpillar trac
tion machine are being used.
. . .
George Mclntyre Gibbs, former man
ager of the Canadian Rank of Com
merce at Dawson, now engaged in the
brokerage business in Vancouver, has
been placed under arrest on charges,
involving a matter of money. Gibbs
has been most active in Vancouver
club and social, as well as business.
life. Klondikers state that in Dowson
he was a prominent curler, club and ;
fraternity man, booster and all-around
good fellow.
? ? ?
| An experimental agricultural station
is to be established near Kitwangak.!
150 miles east of Prince Rupert.
t ? ?
The Indians at Fort Yukon celebrat
ed the holidays in great style. Some
dances cost over $400, and there was
one every night for ten days. These
dances lasted for twelve hours. More
than 300 Indians came to Fort Yukon
for the Christmas and New Year's.
Some even came from Circle. Others
came from Rampart House.
* * *
Skagway firemen will give a grand
ball on the evening of Washington's
birthday.
* * *
F. J. Jerome, a Petersburg blrdman,
promises to establish a fast hydro
plane mall service bewteen Petersburg
and Seattle.
? ? ?
Count Adolph Franzel is a working
miner on Indian creek, Koyukuk dis
trict.
? ? ?
The Indian creek country is of a
granite formation, and miners do not
look upon it with great favor.
? ? ?
Aniak, the new camp on the Kusko
kwlm producerd $25,000 last seas
on.
? ? ?
Representative-elect E. B. Collins
visited Fairbanks recently. Although
he has been in the Fairbanks district
since 1904, he has not spent a month
in town in all that time.
? ? ?
"Right here in Iditarod the Yukon
Gold fining Company has a dredging
propos.tion which is the best thing of
, its kind in the world, and they are go
ing to make the most of it," says the
Iditarod Pioneer.
9 m 9
Jack McCormick has received the
appointment of "roving marshal" to
patrol the Fairbanks district.
Every thing that will please a smok
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
I PUT SPIKED BELT j
ON "RAG" DANCERS
Managers of Spokane Halls
Adopt Method of Curbing
"Turkey Trotters"
' SPOKANE, Wash., Feb. 15.?
Spiked belts for "rag" dancers"
? were put in use here last week
at a dance held in a pub
lic dance hall. The manage
ment announced that any of
the dancers, whether they be
men or women, who persisted
in doing the "turkey trot." or
i any similar dances, would be
forced to wear a spiked belt.
Three young women violated
the rule and the belts, piercdjl
by twenty-penny nails, were
buckled around their waists for
the rest of the evening.
*? -*
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
The new dining room- of the Com
mercial Cafe, with private boxes in
connection, is now open day and night,
and excellent meals are served at all
times. 2-4-t.f.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sftka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m.. Nov. 5, 11. 17. 23. 29,
Dec. 5. 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28. Feb. 3, 9. 15. 21, 27.
March 5, 11, 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11. Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23. Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor.
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station. Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21. 27. Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1. 7, 13. 19. 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWKLL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau !
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW ;
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska ]
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY i
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW I
Mining and Corporation Law \
Offices: Juneau, Alaska |
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
127 Walker Building, Seattle !
After March 15th at Room 6, Alaska
Steam laundry Building 1
H
I
1 '' " ?
The Emp ire j;
for
Job Printing
<
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
|<
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alnxka Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The AlAMkn Flyer
NORTHBOUND
SOUTHBOUND
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
I I I 'M I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I 1 I I I I 1 I M"H"H
? ALASKA
STEAMSHIP COMPANY f
Safety. Service. Speed Ticket* !o Seattle. Tacoma. Victoria ami Vancouver. Through *!*
ticket* to San Francisco T
NEXT BOAT SOUTH?MARIPOSA FEB. 12 }
JEFFERSON Northbound FEB. 11 Southbound. FEB. 12
1 NORTH WEST'N " FEB. 12 Southbound FEB. 18 ?
? T
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. 1
M-I11-l ?I"H~Iiil'iT,]iiliTii,TiI"I Mil I11 I'M 'I 1 1 1 I 1 1 M-i
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for I'ort Simpnon, Prince Rupert, Swannon, Alert Pay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 13
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK KTT. A*t.
?4-i I I II I I I II I I I I I I II I II H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I
i ALASKA COAST CO. i:
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU "
S. S. YUKON - - - FEBRUARY 4 !!
! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
| connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j J
; S. S. YUKON ? ? ? ? FEBRUARY 14 ?'
; Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
; For further information apply to
| S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle jj
H+H I M II I ) I I I I I I I II I I II I II I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ?
> STEAMERS FOR ?
KKATTI.K, TACOMA, ?
J Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, +
J South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, ^
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. f
J C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. I
J 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 115 James Street, Seattle ?
} O O NORTHBOUND FEB. 16 *
? "3* Curacao SOUTHBOUND FEB. 17 ?
J Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
>?????????????????????????????????????????????????????
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukIa" and
Trcadwell
*S: 00 a. m.!
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m. J
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p in. |
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. in.
9:00 p. in.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trend -
well for
Juneau
*8:25 a. m.
9:25 a.m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p.m.
| 3:25 p.m.
4:55 p. m.
G:55p. m.
1 8:25 p. m.
' 9:25 p. m.
1 11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Douvclns for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. j
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p.m. I
7:05 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m. ]!
I^mves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau lor
Sheep Cretic
Saturday Nljfht Only
i 11:00 p. 111.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Trsadwell
11:46 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule name an abovc^excepUripJcuvin^^
?I 1 1 1 Ml I'M I ! 1 I I 1 ?! -I 1 1 l-l-I I 1 III t I 11
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX j
[j. Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan "
t COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
j- FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA I!
I I 1 11 M | | I I I I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 I I 1 1 I
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
I III 11 ? III II II1IW HIIW'Irf.MM'H IIMnBnMaaWMMWMMMMWHBBWIMBMWMMWMBWaBB?
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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