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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 18, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-1
Entorod as sccond-class matter November 7. 1912 at the poutottlce at Ju
ceau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oj?e year, by mall $10.00
Six mouths, by mail 5.00
Per mouth, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. TUESDAY. FEBRUARY IS. 1913.
SAMARITAN SPIRIT OF THE PIONEERS
RECENTLY in an interior district and old miner was found
in his cabin, sick, helpless and destitute. A neighbor went
to town and reported the case at the marshal's office. Of
course that official could do nothing, unless the man was charged
with vagrancy, tried and sentenced. Then he could be cared for
in jail, or hospital. The Government recognizes destitution only
when a formal complaint of this kind is made. Then the ma
chinery of the law is set in motion, and the unfortunate victim
who has committed no crime?save that he is poor and help
less?may be relieved of physical distress. But in this case the
friend revolted at the thought of having the sufferer declared
a vagrant. He knew that the classification would be undeserved,
and so he reported the situation to the Order of Pioneers. And
therein he made no mistake. Willing hands were thrust into
pockets and an ample sum was soon raised to make the sick man
comfortable and to keep him until he recovered.
A year or two ago. in an interior town also, another old man
was found on a remote creek in a dingy cabin, suffering from
scurvy. On the lapel of his coat he wore a Grand Army button.
Woodchoppers found him. They left their work and traveled
many miles to reach the nearest town, only to betold, of course,
that the Government officials could do nothing?unless the old
soldier were "vagged." But he was not. Kind-hearted pioneers?
men and women?saved the veteran that disgrace. He was cared
for until he recovered, cheerfully, gladly, for such is the Sa
maritan spirit of the Alaska pioneers.
These incidents are true. And they are here told for a pur
pose. Congress has refused to listen, in a practical way, to the
appeals that have been made time and again for an oppropria
tion to meet such exigencies as these. And no immediate relief
may be expected from that quarter.
The Territorial Legislature, composed of pioneers, will soon
meet and it is to these that we must look for action. But every
one must help.
A DISCLOSURE OF HIDDEN RICHES.
TO THE stockholders in the Standard Oil Company of New
Jersey, now goes a cash distribution of $40 a share, or $39,
322,000, collected on debts owed by the subsidiary com
panies. They have received additionally the shares of the sub
sidiary companies, which in their turn disclosed vast amounts of
hidden wealth. They still have the stock of the New Jersey
company, which proves a market value of .nearly $448,000,000
after dividing up its holding-company assets.
It is a record of concealed riches unexampled in all time. It
causes no wonder at the secrecy governing all the affairs of
the trust.
What the effect of the decision dissolving the trust may be
in reducing the sources of such enormous richness through com
petition remains to be seen. What has been its effect in disclos
ing what had been concealed is obvious.
A statement printed in a Westward paper is to the effect
that the proprietor of The Daily Empire has endorsed a certain
man for United States marshal for the Third Division. He has
endorsed no one for that or any orther position in the division,
believing that this is a matter for the Democrats of the division
to settle for themselves.
A PROTEST FROM KOYUKUK
THE idea need not be entertained that the good people of
the Koyukuk expected to have the election for the territor
ial legislature declared null and void, when they prepared
their petition and forwarded it to the Election Board. But they
showed method. They seized the opportunity which the fail
ure to hold an election in their precinct presented, and thus made
an excellent expose of the circumstances which hedge them about
in their isolated locality. The claim that they were disfran
chised through the "wilful negligence of the government by its
failure to provide mail and telegraphic service," is eloquent and
ingenious. It is literally the voice of the pioneer crying in the
Alaska wilderness for a few of the many privileges vouchsafed
to the dweller in less sequestered places. It is a protest against
the neglect that these people feel that has been meted out to
them. They took their patriotism with them into the trackless
wilds of a remote country, and they thought, and rightfully, that
at least a few of the privileges that they had known elsewhere
would still be theirs. And they wished, like good and patriotic
citizens, to avail themselves of the right to vote?a right so
many men in more favored regions esteem but lightly.
The cry from the Koyukuk should be answered. The pion
eers of that section are surely entitled to more consideration than
they get. At least they should have a mail sendee that will
keep them in closer touch with the outside world. This, we are
told, they have not now, nor have they ever had it. And there
is a population of several hundred men and women who have lived
there for years.
The protest from Koyukuk is just. And the appeal should
bear some tangible fruit
PLENTY OF FOOD FOR THOUGHT.
THE plans of the Alaska-Juneau Mining Company, as outlined
in an article published in The Daily Empire yesterday should
furnish plenty of food for thought to Juneau people and, in
fact of this entire region. These plans are not merely tentative.
They have been fully matured and are now being developed.
The work outlined is comprehensive in all its details, and its
importance to this district is so apparent that it should not be
necessary to point it out.
A few days since The Empire printed an excerpt from a let
ter received from a Salt Lake City mining man, relative to the
mining developments here. Today is printed an interview given
out by a mining man in New York, who has recently visited this
section. He says, insubstance, that here will soon arise one of
the world's greatest gold quartz mining camps. And this seems
to be the consensus of opinion of mining men now here ancl all
those who have investigated this district.
The development now under way, and those which are con
i templated, are so vast that, perhaps, it is small wonder that
those who are in the midst of them, and have waited with what
patience they could muster for their coming, do not as yet fully
realize their significance. However, this town must keep abreast
of the progress that is under way in order to reap the full bene
fit which these extensive developments will assuredly bring.
11111II1111111111111111111111111111
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home ::
Nothing adds more to tho attractiveness of the homo than , ,
n woll-nppointed table. It helps to mnko tho homo tho placo , ,
homo ouaht to be. And you would lx> surprised. perhaps, , ,
how much it add* to tho positive relish of tho meal. Wo , ,
mnko it easy for you to supply your homo?little by little, if , ,
you like- with a tasteful pattern of silverware. , ,
_Tho?o goods are up-to-date nnd most reliable of any mndo , ,
Come and See Our Look for tho Trade Mark t t
Silverware Department the
GORHAM CO. ?
I I I I I I I I U I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I H I II I I I I
H I'M M-I ! I 1 M M I-M I II II I"H |
The Alaska Press j;
I i I M III 1 111 I 111 I I I 1 M ?!?;-*
Col. Millard has discovered that
there are knockers in Seattle. He had
no need to go that far to make the
discovery. It is a by-product In Alas
ka. Valdez Prospector.
? ? ?
Confidence in the the Iditarod as the
next great placer district of Alaska
has been expressed so frequently in
the Idiatordo Pioneer that we hesitate'
to restate our faith at this time. But
during the past two weeks communica
tions from other sections of Alaska
have been arriving which indicate a
renewed interest in the camp. After
the excitement of the big stampede of
1910 a reaction was to be expected?
as has been the case with every camp
of note; and the misgivings which
prevail for a time was natural.?Idit
arod Pioneer.
? ? ?
Consumers are somewhat curious
to know why it is that Seward pays
?17 the ton for coal, while in Valdez
but $12 the ton is charged.?Seward
Gateway. j
NUTS TO CRACK
Lots of men have been spoiled by
success, but we have yet to hear of a
weather forecaster in that class.
9 9 ?
There wouldn't be much excitmeent
in the world if men were as perfect as
their wives expected them to he.
? ? *
It is often difficult to swallow a
hard-luck story without coughing up.
? * *
The woman investor is always ready
to buy stocks cheap that have been
damaged by water.
* * *
With the people who can't forget,
the past is always present.
? ? ?
Love is a canibal that feeds on its
own kind.
?M-H-H-H 1 I I I M-l-i-.i-i-i-HH-M
:? Northern News Notes |
11 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 I IT M11
Fire broke out in the basement of
the Nome court house, threatening the
whole town, as a strong wind was
blowing. It was got under control,
however.
m m 9
Senator Conrad Feeding, of Nome,
is interested in a promising quartz
mine in Snow Gulch,r in that district.
Assays as high as $1500 have been got
from the ore.
' * "
Miss Lizie Woods and Frank C.
White, missionaries, were married re- y
cently at Fort Yukon. o
? ? ? * *
i >
Anton Strycker, a miner at the < J
Newsboy mine, Fairbanks, was ser- o
iously injured recently by the explo- 4
sion of a box of caps.
* * * o
Miners of Seward peninsula are giv- 0
ing increased attention to quartz pros J |
pecting and some good finds are re- <>
ported. <>
? ? ? < *
i >
The Fairbanks Igloo of the Alaska <'
Pioneers, according to the Times, pro- n
posed and indigent farm for the brok
en down members of the order! y
Sounds like a poor farm in dead earn- n
est. And will they make the old men 0
work when they have reached the y
span when rest is due? ? ?
* * *
A story comes from Hammond river J *
in the Koyukuk. While drilling with ? ?
a steam drill, the drill cut clean <?
through a big nugget, and the gold J [
was brought to the surface showing *?
1 where it had been cut sharp across. <.
I Some story that to make a man take < [
l up his bed and get on board for the < |
Koyukuk. < >
* * * i
Valdez will have a unique exhibit <'
1 at the Panama-Pacific Exposition at I < >
! San Francisco, according to the plans < >
prepared by the townspeople. A sub
scription has been taken up with y
which Sidney Lawrence, the famous <>
English landscape artist, will be com- <>
i mssioned to come to Alaska to paint ^
u vie wof the vicinity of Mount Mc
Kinley. Several local guides will ac
company the painter into the foothills
and will camp the greater part of the
coining summer in the Mt. McKinley
regions.
* * *
The Northern Navigation Company
has announced a freight reduction of
$10 a ton from Seattle to Fairbanks
and lower Yukon points. But the rate
is still $50 a ton.
? ? ?
Representative ('has. Kennedy says
that he had to make about 50 miles
a day with his dog team in coming
from Nome in order to pay for the
moccasins used by his dogs. It cost-1
ing him about a dollar a day for each
dog to protect their feet, says the Yal-;
dez Prospector.
THE NOME CARNIVAL
NETTED $3,000
The great winter carnival of
Nome held last month netted $3,000
after all expenses had been met. Half
of the amount goes to the hospital of
[ the Holy Cross and the other half to
1 a fund for helping sick and destitute
! miners, now deprived of federal aid, \
owing to an order issued by the De
partment of Justice that vagging in
such cases had to cease.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
The new dining room of the Com- j
mercial Cafe, with private boxes in !
connection. Is now open day and night,
and excellent meals arc served at all |
times. 2-4-t.f. j
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m? Nov. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov, 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station. Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9. 15. 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, S. 14. 20,
26. Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19. 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOYVELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
?
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Building, Seattle
After Mnrcti 15th at Room G, Alaska
Steam Luundry Building
The Empire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Alaaka Flyer t
NORTHBOUND MARCH 4
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
y-H-1- -!?-!? -M-H-l ? ? 1 ? ? 1 ? ? 1 ? ? 1 ?! WW I 1 MM !? 1-1 -l M ?! ?! 1' I'd I 1 I I I I-1 1 I 1 1 ^
IT? ALASKA j
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
r Safety, Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle, Tucoma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through
?J* tickets t?San Francisco *r
j; MARIPOSA Norbound FEB. 21 Southbound FEB. 27 ;;
-I- NORTH WEST'N " FEB. 12 Southbound FEB. 18 ??
*;? Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. *"
.;. .H-H-H-i -l-l-I-l .l.-I-I-I-I-I-l-I. M 1-K 11111 MM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 II l-l'l l4
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.~B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpxon, Prince Rupert, Swnnson, Alert Ray, Vnncouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 27
Front anil Seward Sin. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT, Atct.
-H I I I t I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I II I I II I It I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
i| ALASKA COAST CO. ij
For Yakutat, Katalla. Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, . >
!! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
!! S. S. YUKON MAR. 1
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
| | connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j |
? ? S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 ? ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? 1
For further information apply to
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle j1
?I-V-W-+-M-W-5-f->! I i ? n a M I I I l-H I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. |
STEAMERS FOR ?
SKATTIJ-;. TACOMA, J
? Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, +
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, ^
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. f
% C. ?. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. X
j 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle i
SQ r> NORTHBOUND FEB. 19 Z
? Curacao SOUTHBOUND FEB. 20 T
<> Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
. <>??????<>?????????????????????? ? ? ? ? ??+????? ? ?????????
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
twccn JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Tread well
*8:00 a. in.
9:00 a. in.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p in.
?1:30 p. m.
C:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
? i.w Tread
well for
Juneau
j *8:25 a. m. I
1 0:25 a. m. |
| 12:00 noon
I 1:40 p. m.
| 3:25 p.m.
! 4:55 p.m.
6:55 p. m.
S:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Doutrla* for
Juneau
1*8:30 a. m. j
I 9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. tz.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11 :30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
r n>m rfuncau
Shwp Crt!?+t
Saturday NiKht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule wimi' as above. exccpUripjcavinKjIuno^
?i?I-1 II I1!11,|I||I,|I| I-I-H-I i I ! I I M'M-I I I H I 1 1 I I I 1 I I 1 1"1
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX j
[j. Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan ")
t COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
t FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
?H-H-H-i-I-i-l-I-l-I' l-H I 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I I 1 I 1 I--I !??!' 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
UNION IRON WORKS A achine Shop and Foundry I
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for ii
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES'
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
9 \
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I f

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