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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 20, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postotllce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act cf March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 100
JUNEAU. ALASKA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1913
POLITICAL PROPHETS
WITHIN less than two weeks?twelve days to be exact?the
United States will have an Administration Democratic in
all its branches, and people everywhere are naturally ex
pectant as to what the future may bring. The people of the
country last November, by their votes, declared for a change
and it is about to be ushered in. And it is as certain as the day
that there will be new policies and departures in the method of
government. Some new roads will undoubtedly be tried, and
the politicians of opposite political faiths will freely prognosti
cate stark ruin for the Nation. Indeed they have already done
so, and their piping is daily becoming a trifle louder as the day
approaches when they will no longer be in control.
Panics have been predicted and a siump in prosperity nus
been foretold. However, the fact is that politicians never did
interfere with the prosperity of this or any other country, and
never will. If all the laws they make and all the things they do,
were put in a single bundle and hurled at the head of any one
of our industries, no great harm would result. No law has ever
been passed to cripple business; business has always been pro
tected, some of it too much.
But the thing that, at times, has seriously interfered with
our affairs and our prosperity, has been the common, simul
taneous agreement of all our business men to suspend operations
to see if something terrible were not on the verge of happen
ing. This attitude of course, interferes with business. Why
not ? Business has to be attended to; it never attends to itself.
But no power on earth has force enough to interfere with the
business of this country when the business men are determined
to attend to business. It may have arrived tardily, certainly
it has. but it has arrived at last?the universally accepted be
lief that business and politics are two different, distinct things
not seriously inter-dependent, and that we need not longer wait
upon or fear the politicians. And if we learn nothing more than
this from our years of political kindergartening, then our adult
school days have not been spent in vain.
To the members of the Legislature: "Welcome to our city."
May your stay be pleasant to yourselves and profitable to the
Territory.
OVER-RIDING THE PRESIDENT'S VETO.
A FEW days ago President Taft vetoed the immigration law,
passed at this session of Congress, a feature of which was
an educational test for immigrants. By the terms of this
clause the prospective immigrant wasrequired to be able
to read in his own or some other language. The Senate quite
promptly over-rode the Presidential veto by more than the neces
sary two-thirds vote. But the House failed to follow the lead
of the Senate, and the veto was permitted to remain in full force
and effect. The action of the House was a matter of some sur
prise. as was also that of the Senate, for that matter. The Sen
ate is looked upon as a more staid and conservative body than
th House, which, for some reason or other, is considered a more
radical assemblage. But the reasons for the Senate over-riding
the President's veto, and the House for sustaining it, may be
found in the fact that the Senators have a longer tenure of of
fice than the Representatives, and the latter also are supposed
to be "closer to the people." Therefore, having in view the safe
ty of their seats, "they Qhose to acquiesce in the President's action.
There is little doubt that our immigration laws need re
modeling. but it is only to be expected that there will arise a
strong division of opinion as to whether an educational test
should be applied to immigrants. The influences for and against
are formidable, but amendment within a short time is inevitable.
"That Washington damned the Senate," says the New York
World, "is but another evidence of his ability to be always first
in war. first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen."
A NEW MONROE DOCTRINE
RECENTLY The Empire suggested,?apropos of the continual
disturbances in the Latin-American republics, and the en
larged duties of the United States as policeman?that the
Monroe Doctrine should be revised?upward or downward.
In a leading magazine we find an illuminating article on
the Monroe Doctrine, in which the position is taken that a defi
nite statement of the Doctrine should be made by the repub
lics of the Western Hemisphere acting in concert. What we call
the Monroe Doctrine is the declared purpose of the United States
to permit no European government to acquire more American
territory. But the Doctrine needs definite statement. In seven
ty-five years it has undergone an evolution that extends its pur
port far beyond the language of Adams and Monroe. It needs
development on the positive side, having been, up to the present,
thought of chiefly in its negative aspect. It is popularly conceived
as a principle forbidding European powers to interfere in this
hemisphere. Few consider that if we assert a right we assume a
corresponding duty; that if we prohibit other governments from
enforcing just claims in the Americas, we take the responsibility
of doing it ourselves.
The question then is: Is the Unitel States to announce that
it will answer for the good behavior of the rest of the American
republics? To do that would be to bring down upon our heads
the bitter hatred of the hemisphere. Nicaragua, Santo Domingo,
and the rest of the delinquents are willing to hide behind us when
Europe threatens punishment for their misdeeds, but they in
dignantly resent any intimation from us that it is our duty to
do anything more than stand between them and such punish
ment.
It might clear the air to make the Monroe Doctrine and its
implications the subject of a compact between all the Amer
ican republics?a compact in which it would be made plain that
a guarantee against invasion from abroad has its necessary co
t M 1111?I ? ..
rollary in the right of the guarantor to enforce good behavior;
and in which, further, it would be made plain that the mainte
nance of the Doctrine is a responsibility upon all America and
not merely upon the United States.
And still there comes no Cabinet news from Trenton. And
it may also be remarked that Oyster Bay has been exceedingly
quiet of late.
"Will Bryan be in the Cabinet?" That question will be an
swered within a few days, automatically as it were .
#
TWO MEN LOSE
LIVES ON TRAIL
C. C. Chittlck and John Kesler lost
their lives in the Happy river region,
while enroute from Seward to the Idit
arod. On the morning of January 27,
the two men, with a dog team, set out
from Anderson's roadhouse, on Happy
river, enroute to the interior gold
camp. On February 7, while Ander
son was cutting wood, four dogs, in
harness, appeared, and Anderson rec
ognized the animals as belonging to
Chittick and Kesler. One of the dogs,
the leader, led him to a snow drift
about two miles from his roadhouse.
The dog refused to go further and An
derson came to the conclusion that the j
dead men must be lying beneath the j
pile of snow. He hastened home, and !
the next day set out for Susltna, the
nearest settlement, for the purpose of
obtaining aid. A. A. Chittick, a broth
er of the lost man, lives at Susitna.
Headed by him a party of four set
out in search of the missing ones.
They departed from Susitna in time
to reach the place by the twelfth of
February.
The news was brougm uy
the Japaneses inusher. He left Idit-!
arod City January 29. and had a good
trip out. Wada Is backed by Mcll
henny, the Louisiana tobasco king, and
has valuable property in the Tulasak
region, on the Kuskokwim. Wada is
cnroute to the States on the North
western.
MANY ARRIVE ON
THE NORTHWESTERN
The Northwestern arrived in Juneau
from the Westward at 3:30 this morn
ing. bringing the following passengers
for Juneau:
From Seward?L. V. Ray and wife.
G. Dreibelbis, H. Roden. From Val
dez?Conrad Freedling, Dan Driscoll,
Dan Sutherland, J. B. Renwick, J. C.
Kennedy, E. B. Collins. F. A. Aid
rich, M. Donnelly, Otto Peterson, M.
L. Tatum, T. Gaffney. From Cordova
? Miss Fannie Clark, F. M. O'Neill,
F. B. Ferrel, and W. E. Wood.
The following went through to Se
| attle:
From Seward?J. P. Fay, J. Wada.
j Miss L. N. Gordon, E. T. Smith, F.
! Joaquin.
From Valdez?Cyril Bee, A. B. lies,
I J. T. Evans, J. Newlin, Miss Futteren,
J. M. Paule and wife, J. J. Folstad. A.
H. Hanot. L. L. Henkel, F. R. Wilson
and wife, C. Whalen, J. A. Sellers and
wife, J. Felnbloom, H. A. Somers
ville, Capt. G. P. Sproul, A. Nelson,
W. Maloney, F. M. Brown, J. Krum,
M. Reihc, J. A. McGrath, and E. Mc
Connell.
From Cordova?R. W. Baxter, u. z~
H. Birch, H. J. Watklns, jr., Mrs. C.
S. Brattin, T. Burns, G. Gelger and o
wife, and M. J. Sullivan.
From Ellamar, W. R. Hocking and
wife, and A. R. Brown. < >
From LaTouche?W. L. Taylor.
<?
< >
IF HAT BOY WHISKS <>
YOU, IT'S AN INSULT ;;
SPRINGFIELD, 111., Feb. 20?A '.at
boy endeavored to apply a whisk < *
broom to Gov. Dunne yesterday when
he was not expecting it. The Gov- o
ernor leaped away. And that "re
minded him," and he told this him- ?
self: o
"I have come to disapprove of unin- < [
vited attentions from brush wielders,
especially since a little episode in a o
Chicago restaurant a few weeks ago.
"Col. J. Ham. Lewis took me to
breakfast and I learned the cofTee was o
35 cents a cup and I walked out of o
the place. In another restaurant I
was talking to a friend when some one < ?
laid violent handB on me. In one of o
the hands was a whisk broom. The
broom was swung against my back < *
and over my shoulders, and some of
the whacks hurt a litle. %
1 "I turned to the husky gentleman ' |
? and ordered a halt. 'If you touch me <?
again with that broom,' I told him, 'I < >
I will have you arrested for assault and < >
battery.' * \
"The man gazed at me in wonder. < ?
"'Yes, I wil,' I repeated. 'Don't you
? know that the laying on of hands is ?
enough to prefer the charge of assault
and battery?
"So if any citizen of the State is at
tacked by persons with brooms, seek
ing 'tips' for services which are not
wanted, they may fall back on assault
and battery if they like."
ADVERTISED LETTERS
List of letters remaining unclaimed
in the Postofllce at Juneau, Alaska,
on Feb. 15, 1913. Parties calling for
them should call for "Advertised Let
ters," and give date of list.
Berrie Mrs. B.
Carre, J. D.
Johnson, Hans (card)
Johnstone, F. A.
Kjelle, Hans (card)
Larson, Mrs. Victor.
Larson, Mrs. Eva
Leach. Ed (card)
Lundall, O. E. F.
McDonald, Jack (2)
Nagby, Hugo (card)
Rully, C. A.
Turley. Jas. F. (2)
Tods, Mrs. Rose (card)
Young. Walter (card)
Young, Chas. W.
Young, Lawrence.
E. L. HUNTER. P.M.
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
CONTRACTORS ? BUILDERS
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. .Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killlsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5. 11, 17. 23, 29,
Dec. 5. 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4. 10,
16. 22, 2S. Feb. 3, 9. 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Punter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
l March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00 '
I a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualln, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19. 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21. 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
111111111111 e 111111 n 11111111111111?
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your home ::
Nothing adds more to tho attractiveness of tho homo than , ,
n woll-appointod table. It helps to mnkc tho homo tho place , .
homo ouftht to bo. And you would bo surprised. perhaps, , ,
how much It ndda to tho positive relish of tho meal. Wo , ,
mako it ?n?y for you to supply your homo?little by little, if , ,
you Uko?with u tasteful pattern of silverware. . ?
? Throe Uoods arc up-to-date and most reliable of any made , ,
I Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mark t t
Silverware Department tho \ \
f GORHAM CO. ? ? I
and OPTICIAN ? ?
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW j.
i J
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW ;
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY ,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW |
Mining and Corporation Law J
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Huildinir, Seattle \
After March l!ith at Room fi. Alaska '
Steam Ijiundry Building 1
.
The Emp ire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT 1 he A lank* Flyer
NORTHBOUND MARCH 4
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, A?ent
i-H-K-i 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 l-I-.I-I-I-I-l-1.1 -l-I' 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1' m 1 M
\W\ ALASKA
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service. Speed Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through
ticket* to San Franciaco
? MARIPOSA Northbound FEB. 21 Southbound FEB. 27 ;;
! NORTHWESTERN Northb'd... MAR. 3 Southbound MAR. 9 ??
I JEFFERSON Northbound FEB. 21 Southbound Feb. 22
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. **
?M-H-H 1 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 !?1~1 1"1 I ?! I -111 I 1 I III I 1 1 1 I III III I 111 1 1 !? M !"??
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Siniptton, Prince Itupert. Swunnon, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY . FEB. 27
Front and Sewurd St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT. Aift. j
-4-11 M ? I I I II I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
i ALASKA COAST CO. j!
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdcz, Latouche, Seward, ? .
I! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON MAR. 1
! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
| | connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j j
? ' S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 ? '
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
For further information apply to ''
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle 11
11111;; 11! i: i ii 111 ii 1111 ii ii 111 ii ii 11111 ii 11111 H
???H?W?mm??WtHm??yT?>TTTTTTTT. .
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP C 0. ?
I STEAMERS FOR ?
I SEATTOJ3, TACOMA, |
^ Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympla, Port Townsend, 4
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, *
0 Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ?
1 C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. 4
Y ?
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle a
? ^ ^ C NORTHBOUND FEB. 19 $
? Curacao SOUTHBOUND FEB. 20 ?
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ?
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukIuh and
Tread well
*S:00 a. n:.!
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. ra. ]
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m. |
4:30 p. in.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. ni.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for
J uneau
?8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p.m.
| 3:25 p.m.
4:55 p.m.
6:55 p. m
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Do uk Ins for
Juneau
?8 : 30 a. m. j
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. in.
11:30 p.m.
Leaven Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
r rom Junoau lor
Sheop Cr?4t
Saturday Nitfht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same us above. except tripUiavinK^neiitt at H a. m. in |
I I I 1 Ml H-H 1 I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I ! I I 1 1 I 1 1 I l-l
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
** Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan
I! COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
?H-H 1 i 1 I ?! ?! I"!1 i ?!??! M 1 1 I I 1 I III 111 111 1 III I 1 HI 111 1 1 1- 111 1 I I
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
?
We Are Headquarters for ij
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
i |
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
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