OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 24, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-02-24/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-clas* matter November 7, 1912 at the poatolfice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
G*e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU ALASKA. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 1913.
LEGISLATORS IN CAUCUS .
THE members of the Territorial Legislature, who are now
here, have gotten together in caucus a couple of times, and
a few of our citizens have had an opportunity to see the gen
tlemen in preliminary action. Of course the personnel of the Leg
islature and the work that that body shall perform can be only
adequately measured when their labors have been completed.
Has it not been said of old time, "By their fruits ye shall know
them;" and until the fruit shall have been ripened, one cannot
judge what it will be like.
However, it may be said that Alaskans need take no shame
because of the men whom they have elected as lawmakers, if
one may judge them as a composite picture of men in action.
The impression they create is favorable. They give evidence of
being men of affairs sincerely imbued with the desire to achieve
results. That is the spirit which seems to animate them, and
if it be followed throughout, results will be obtained.
The first legislative assembly of Alaska is, numerically, a
small body, but it is representative, and that augurs for its suc
cess. And all through the woof and the warp of history, in any
time, in any age, barbarous or civilzed, it is found that little
things have led to big results and enduring achievements. In
the home, as in the nation, in the case of individuals, as in the
case of empires, little things are often big things in their be
ginning.
~ * ?" ? Ml 4.U
The Legislature of Alaska win grow as wiu aisu uic
undeveloped commonwealth whose development and prosperity
should be the concern of all.
The Legislature of the State of Washington has sent con
gratulations to "he Alaska Legislature, the youngest legislative
body of the United States.
THE KILLING OF MADERO.
THE killing of former President Madero and former Vice Pres
ident Suarez yesterday may have been the result of an at
tempt io escape from their guards; it may have been done
at the command or with the connivance of President Huerta
in order to remove Madero forever as a factor in Mexican af
fairs The de.ith of Madero is to be sincerely regretted. Madero
led the uprising against Porfirio Diaz which ended with Madero's
election to the presidency in 1911. It was based on principles
of right, liberty and humanity. It was aimed at tyranny and
graft. The disorders which have reduced Mexico to its pres
ent condition are due to reaction, to an inherent love of pillage,
to hopes of confiscation and to ignorant and foolish hatred of
the United States inflamed by demagogues and desperadoes.
It is not a political and social revolution. It is a cut-throat
thing, such as have been witnessed in Santo Domingo, in the
Central American States and in the Northern States of South
America. Its triumph over the unstable Madero government
is not that of an organization or a principle, but that of scat
tered mobs with no restraining hand and no purpose but power
or plunder.
Mexico could not have reached this degradation 11 among
its leading men there had been even a rudimentary desire for
conciliation, peace and order. Madero was not a great captain
or a great statesman, but he personified the only hope of a na
tion for consctitutional rule. It was Madero or the mob. Torn
by its conspirators Mexico has chosen the mob. In so doing,
practically all of its warring factions defy the United States.
In view of the great responsibilities involved, it must pres
ently be asked how long the policy of non-interference on the part
of the United States can be maintained. For the information
of those in Mexico who may not be wholly, bereft of reason, it
ought to be said soon and authoritatively that the existing era
of murder and rapine must close. There need be no doubt of
our ability to end it, great as the cost may be and reluctant as
the American people would be to undertake the task. Equally
beyond question is the fact that with their attention sharply
drawn to the situation by long-continued anarchy, the American
people will insist upon action. If the United States be compelled
to act in behalf of civilization, our flag once raised south of the
Rio Grande will never come down. This is not the "Manifest
Destiny" of the forties and fifties. It is the merciless logic of
twentieth century civilization. The issue is with Mexico.
It is a far cry in civilized progress from Japan where re
cently the Premier was stoned, to England where the job has
been assumed by women, who have also become dynamiters,
and "accept the full responsibility" of the crime.
PERKINS ON ENORMOUS INCOMES
GEORGE W. PERKINS, to whom the Trusts have been ex
ceedingly kind, and by whose operations he was quickh
enabled to obtain at least a snug competence, now believes
in an inheritance tax and an income tax. Sapiently he concludes
that "our people are going to curtail incomes." Mr. Perkins has
seen a great light, in very recent years. In truth very recently
he has attached himself to reform policies, somewhat vague anc
nebulous to be sure, but still he has heard the cry from Macedon
ia, and has become somewhat wise in counsel, at least. His per
spicacity is such that he sees the impending change and has pre
pared himself for it, unlike the majority of his class who fail t<
see the handwriting on the wall which foredooms the might]
concentration of wealth, in the hands of the few, that the pas
quarter of a century has witnessed.
Mr. Perkins is an astute man and a financier. He knows tha
the old order changes and the new comes. Monopoly and privi
lege have given many their enormous incomes, among them Mr
Perkins himself, and he knows that when monopoly and privi
lege are removed from our laws, and business is taken out o
government and government out of business, the day of spoila
tion of the people shall have passed. The one-time personifica
tion of Big Business, Mr. Perkins seems to have learned that '
Big Business can come with clean hands into council or it must
come into court, as it shall elect.
Mexico may succeed the Balkan States as the scene of the j
chorus girl shows.
I I I 1 1 I I I-1 i I I 1 1 I I 1 I H
The Alaska Press
?I I I 1 I I 11 1 1 1 I I I I-M I M-H'M-H
The disinterested work of Secretary
Fisher to bring about the building of
a railroad from one coast to the Ta
nana has especially endeared him to
the people of this district. It is this
work of Secretary Fisher that has giv
en us hopes of a government-built and
government-operated railroad, and con
stitutes the one lone star in the Taft
firmament as far as Alaska is con
cerned.?Fairbanks Citizen.
* * *
Assistant Sccreatary of State Pierce
I denies complicity in the sealing graft
so long practised on the Pribiloff isl
ands. No one expected him to 'fess
up this early in the game.?Valdez
; Prospector.
* * *
Should the incoming administration
do nothing else for the common peo
ple of the country than lift the yoke
put upon their neck by the Aldrich
Vreeland Currency act. and for the
further burden of the proposed Aid
rich act, they will go into history, prob
ably not recognized now but in the fu
ture as one of the great administra
tions of all times.-?Fairbanks Citizen.
* * *
Now that the trial of Barnette on
the various charges has been brought
to a close, and, he having been found
guilty of misdemeanor and fined, it
is up to the numerous depositors to
raise by popular subscription the sum
of one thousand dollars, pay the fine
imposed upon him. and deduct it pro
rata from the amount still owing to
them. This would in a degree atone
for "besmirching" his "character."
The depositors lost "only" about a
half million dollars?not worth making
a fuss about.?Ruby Record-Citizen.
* * *
The steel trust is supposed to share
its profits?but that is only a titanic
joke upon the part of this industrial
oger. It deceives no one least of all
those intimately concerned. Never
theless, even in the event of a bona
fide system of profit sharing being in
troduced and "honest" laborer made
the recipient of a "partnership" we
suppose the amount or rights such
partnership would confer would still
be a source of dispute between the
principals thereof. ? Nome Industrial
Worker.
"PRAISE FROM SIR ROL
AND IS PRAISE INDEED"
"The Outside mail arrived yester
day afternoon and consisted almost
entirely of first class matter. Among
the papers received were the first num
bers of Major Strong's new Juneau
daily, The Daily Alaska Empire. It
is quite metropolitan looking, being a
large, seven-columned paper and con
tains much news of an interesting na
ture, local and telegraphic. Needless
to say the editorial columns of the
paper are not the least attractive T*
feature In connection with The Em- o
pire. Major Strong reminds one when < >
writing, of the praise Johnson ex
tended to Goldsmith 'he touched noth- <>
ing which he did not adorn.' One may ?>
not always agree with him, but one
has to agree that he writes attractive- ?
ly on almost any subject."?Nome In- o
1 dustrial Worker.
SECESSION POOR ;;
POLICY FOR A. B.'S
The Arctic Brotherhood camps of < >
the Interior are going on record as < J
r being opposed to the proposition of * |
secession from the Grand Camp, as is o
5 proposed by some of the organiza- <>
5 tions. A meeting of the Cleary Camp **
; No. 22, held Jan. 15, the members said < ?
j that they were with Camp Fairbanks o
, and Camp Haines in the matter of \ |
the Grand Camp in allowing charters *>
' to be granted for the formation of < ?
- camps on the Outside. The Cleary
_ Arctics, however, do not wish to se
. cede unless absolutely necessary, says o
the Fairbanks Times, and are accord
' ingly bringing the Grand Camp to re- ^
t spect the wishes and desires of the <?
Alaska camps.
t |o
. BOSTON POETESS WRITES ;;
SONG FOR ALASKA
^ A special writer in the Boston Post
says that he has just had a talk with ''
Miss Charlotte W. Hawes, the poet <>
- and composer of songs of peace and ^
patriotism, who was the friend of
Emerson, Luck Larcom and other
great literary lights. Miss Hawes has
just composed words and music of a
song which may be destined to become
the State song of Alaska, as she has
also been th composer of the State
songs of several other common
wealths.
BALLOT BOX STUFFERS
ARE FINED BY LYONS
Judge Lyons passed sentence at Val
dez on John Falstadt, Alex Fredolln
and Chas. Jajoman for illegally certi
fying to the Afognak election returns |
last August. Falstadt received a fine
of $450, Fredolin was considered less
guilty and his fine was $250, while
Charles Jajaman received the mini-!
mum fine of $200, as he had admitted
his guilt.
In passing sentence Judge Lyons
took occasion to call the defendants'
attention, and incidentally the public j
to the great risk of the franchise, and ;
that the right must and should be re-:
spected to the end that a fair and hon-1
est election be held.
Attorney Bunnell, for the defend-!
ants Falstadt and Fredolin asked for
a stay of judgment, and it was grant
ed and bonds of $1,500 required of
them.
The cost of the action amounted to j
about $20,000.
Every thing that will please a amok-1
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
? i
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
CONTRACTORS ? BUILDERS
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
? ;
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juueau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Ter.akee, Killisnoo and Sitka??
8:00 a m.. Nov. 5. 11. 17. 23. 29.
Dec. 5. 11, 17. 23, 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27,
March 5. 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21.
j March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. in.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9, 15, 21, 27. Jan. 2, 8, 14. 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
111111111111111111111111111 i 1111111 r
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home ;!
Nothing adds more to the attractiveness of the homo than , ,
a well-appointed table. It helps to mukc the homo the place , , .
home ought to bo. And you would t>e surprised. porhnps, , ,
how much it adda to the positive relish of the meal. We , ,
make it easy for you to supply your home?little by little, if , ,
you like?with a tasteful pattern of silverware. , ,
_ Theae goods are up-to-dute and moat reliable of any made , ,
Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mark t t
Silverware Department ?' die
1 GORHAM CO. ? ' |
I I CHARICK^m^::
JSSSu,
I I I II 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY j
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... A'aska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
<127 Walker Building, Seattle
After March 1.1th at Room 0, Alaska
Steam Laundry Building
lie Empire
(or
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Al&ika Flyer ?f HUMBOLDT ' he Alnnkn Flyer
NORTHBOUND MARCH 4
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Soattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOHD, Agent
____________________?-??????___
?M-H--H?H-H-H-H-H-H I 1 I 1 I I I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 I -i
j\@\ ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
j-> Safety, Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle. Tacoma. Victoria anil Vancouver. Through ?'
J ? ? tickets to San Franciaco
*? MARIPOSA Northbound FEB. 21 Southbound FEB. 27 ??
NORTHWESTERN Northb'd... MAR. 3 Southbound MAR. 9 y
" JEFFERSON Northbound FEB. 21 Southbound Feb. 22 !!
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. ??
?l-4~H~H~1"Iiilii1iiIi I 1 l l11 I I M1I I-1 I I I I I 1 I"l I I 1 I 11
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Itupert Swanaon. Alert Hay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 27
j Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J T. SPICKETT, Aid. j
II I I II I I I I I I u I I II 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
| ALASKA COAST CO. i!
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ..
!! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU 1!
!! S. S. YUKON MAR. 1 l!
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
| ) connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California port6 j j
; ; S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 ? '
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
; ' For further information apply to ' ?
;; S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ?'
?M I M I II! I II I I II 1 I I II II I II I I I II I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ?
<? STEAMERS FOR ?
KKATTIJ:. TACOMA, J
o Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham. Everett, Olympla, Port Townsend, ?
S:.i Be'liogham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, X
<? Aracortes. Los Angeles and San Diego. ?
X c. D. DL'N ANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ?
][ 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle X
? ^ ^ C NORTHBOUND MARCH 4 J
? X-'lir&CB.O SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5 ?
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ?
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Trend well
?8 :00 a. ir..
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p ci.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. ni.
11:00 n. m.
Lv. Trend
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. j
9:25 a. m. I
12:00 noon !
1:40 p.m.
3:25 p.m.
4:55 p.m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaven
Douirla* for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m. I
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. in
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaven Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
I
Leaves Sheep
; Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau lor
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nittht Only
j 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. in.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Siimlny S.-In?? 1 n!'? ami' :h :il>?v?-. r\c<-|?T ? rip 1,'uvitnr J?
?H I I I I 1 1 I I M I 1 I I 1 1 I I 1 I 1 1 I I i I 1 I I 1 I'
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX t
I* Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan "
I COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
i i 11 i i"i 1111111111111111111111111111111111 n 11
i UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
*
We Are Headquarters for ::.
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
1 4 " O

xml | txt