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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 03, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE]
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. .*>-7-1
Eut>?rod iii* second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the poetofflce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mall 6-00
Per month, delivered 100
JUNEAU. ALASKA. MONDAY. MARCH 3. 1913.
ORGANIZATION OF THE LEGISLATURE
ALASKA'S First Legislature was formally convened at twelve
o'clock today with somewhat impressive ceremonies, as be
tiitted the occasion. The presiding officers of the Senate
and House were formally elected, their selection having been
previously determined in caucus. The choice made by each is
excellent, though we believe, that no mistake would have been
made by the election of any of the gentlmen mentioned for the
respective positions. It is a matter for congratulation that the
choice of presiding officers was effected without discord. In fact
the selections, we are told, were effected in complete harmony.
That is to say there was neither bitterness nor rancor in the con
tests. such as too frequently is the case in some State Legisla
tures of age and experience. The rivalry though keen was en
tirely good-natured, and each body is still a sort of happy fam
ily. .May it continue so to the end.
Thus the initial session of the first Legislature starts out
under more than ordinarily auspicious circumstances. Senator
Ray is well equipped mentally and otherwise for President of
the Senate, and that he will give the utmost satisfaction goes
without saying. And the same may be said of Speaker Collins.
He will make a fair and impartial head of the House of Repre
sentatives. and we do not think there is any danger that he will
develop into a czar, like his distinguished prototypes who have
ruled the Congress.
It is always well to bear in mind that the feet of all idols
are made of mud.
ALASKA'S AGRICULTURAL LANDS
LEADERS of The Empire cannot fail to have been impressed
with the many practical views of members of the Legisla
ture concerning vital questions, as published in this news
paper the past week. They embraced many subjects?rail
roads. wagon-roads, the fisheries, opening of the coal mines, la
bor laws, woman suffrage, amendments to the mining laws, code
revision, and others. One of the members?the Hon. Milo Kelly,
o! K tik.?touched upon the agricultural possibilities of the Su
sitna aiul Matanuska valleys, with which he is familiar. His
words v. n illuminating, and the\ will aid in dispelling some
ot thi v. ist> o: ignorance and misinformation concerning Alas
ka's aerie .Itural lands. The character of the soil and climatic
cordi; :ons. .Mr. Kelly tells us, are such that these valleys are cer
tain to be settled with homeseekers, if transportation facilities
are provided. The hills are covered with bunch grass and the
valleys with red-top. Barley and oats are successfully raised
and they mature well: and vegetables of all kinds thrive amazing
ly and attain a rare perfection. There is no airy persiflage about
these statements. They are based upon cold facts, which show
that Alaska has an agricultural future of considerable promise.
Then Mr. Kelly touches upon another important matter in
this connection. He says that the homestead law should be
amended so as to give the poor man better opportunity than he
now has. Under the present law the homesteader must have
forty acres reduced to cultivation before title will be granted,
and this handicap is practically prohibitive of a rapid settlement
of the agricultural lands of the Territory. There is justice in
the contention. The laws appertaining to the development of
these lands should be of the most liberal character. Induce
ments must be offered to settlers to become bona fide farmers.
With the opening of the Panama Canal there will be undoubtedly
an increased immigration direct from Europe to the Pacific Coast,
and Alaska should profit by it to some extent. The people who
-i-i i i? It-- J *- ?. A lrtnbrt r* v*/? V* r% v?m inrr lon/^o
WOU1C1 Ut? natul an V Ull Ct lCU IW m Acaivu ui lai uuu^ muuo
would come from the North of Europe, where the best immigra
tion comes from. This is a matter well within the province of
the Legislature upon which to memorialize Congress. A more
liberal homestead law would be the means of attracting a desir
able class of immigrants.
And if, as we hope and expect, an era of railroad building
is about to materialize, and the coal lands are to be developed,
and other mining industries extended, ready markets will be found
for all kinds of agricultural products, including cattle and sheep.
There is an increasing spirit of hopefulness to the West
ward. because of the favorable reports of railroad building under
government auspices. Southwestern Alaska and Western Alas
ka are rich in promise and will yet come into their own.
TO CUT OUT THE SUBSIDY
PRESIDENT-ELECT WILSON has let it be known to Demo
cratic leaders of the United States Senate that he favors
the Root amendment to the Canal Tolls act, repealing the
free tolls clause for American shipping passing through the Pa
nama canal, which a committee of the Senate tabled not long
ago. But in view of Mr. Wilsons action it is evident that the
Senate committee's course will not end the matter. Senator
Root proposed to repeal the discriminating and treaty break
ing clause of the act which has brought down upon the United
States the protests of the world.
A few days ago Great Britain flatly asked that the questior
be arbitrated, and tomorrow we shall have a President whose
Democracy will hardly permit him to support a ship subsidy,
and it may be safely assumed that the subsidy feature of the
Canal Tolls act. will be either cut out or the matter will be ar
bitrated. thus vindicating the position taken by Senator Root
and other able constitutional lawyers of the Senate, and out
side of it.
Modern business betters human environment. It means gar
dens, fruit, flowers, vegetables; it means quick, safe and cheap
transportation of people, commodities and messages?business
consists in the production, transportation and distribution oi
things that are necessary to human life.
Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry; for anger resteth in
the bosom of fools?Ecclesiastes.
I I I I I I I I I M 1 1 ...... . .......
j 111111 r 11111111111111 i-i-H
The Alaska Press
?I I I I I H I I I 1 I'M I I 1 I M I I 1 1 ?
Cordovuns fully appreciate what this
(railroads to the interior and coal
mines) means and are hopefully look-]
ing foward to what has long been de
j layed but was sure to materialize?
I continued prosperity, in anticipation
of the new order of things the shrewed
business man and citizen has already
taken tune by the forelock and is niak
i
ing investments here. Real estate
has been given a greater value and
during the past twenty-four hours
more property deals have been con
summated in Cordova than for months.
?Cordova Alaskan.
NOTES AND GLEANINGS
Since alchemists of the mediaeval
ype still flourish, it was inevitable that
the recent discoveries by Sir William
Ramsay and his colleagues would stim
ulate anew the pretensions of those
who transmute baser metals into gold
for a price. The Times is in receipt of
a letter from Rudolph Melville Hunter
of Philadelphia, who wishes ti to be
known that he is ten years ahead of
Sir William, Prof. Collie, and Prof.
Patterson, in creating and transmuting
matter. Mr. Hunter adds:
Not only that, but 1 was (ten
years ago) actually doing the
same in material quantities, and
have been ever since: not quanti
ties that require a spectroscope
to determine their presence, but
quantities which you can handle
and weigh, and which have large
purchasing value?that is to say,
as pure gold as ever went through
the mint.
Prof. Collie is himself not sure that
the dream of the ancient alchemists
is not about to be fulfilled. Indeed,
the theory supported by Albert de
Groot, Arnaldus de Villanova, Ray
mond I.udly, and Paracelus has never
been controverted by the modern
chemists, but, obviously, those who in
the future shall make gold "on a com
mercial basis" will not need the aid
of any capital in pushing the enter
prise.
"The idea of 'Safety First' in rail
road operation," The Baltimore Sun
says, "originated with Ralph C. Rich
ards. General Claim Agent of the Chi
cago & Northwestern Railway two
years ago." President Willard of the
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was an
other "father" of the movement, for ho
issued this order: "In any emergency
all our employees are to act on the
side of safety." Thas was fourteen
months ago. Eight years ago James
O. Fagan, whose "Confessions of a
Railway Signal Man" made him fa
mous, sent a letter to the heads of the
chief railway systems in the United
States urging the formation of a Safe
ty League, an organization of em
ployees distinguished by buttons and
other insignia, and dedicate to the
principle of "Safety First"
NUTS TO CRACK
Overwork kills almost as many peo
ple as over-rest.
? ? ?
Many an architect seems to have
bad designs on the public.
? ? ?
It's when the game gets too hot
that some people get cold feet.
? ? ?
Every old maid has an excuse for
being single, even if it is only that +4
she was born that way. x
' * * J
Love may make the world go < ?
round, but it won't always bring the
girl's father around. < *
.9 9 9 i>
If you are going to tell a man just < [
what you think of him, pick out one **
who is smaller than you are. ' o
? ? ? o
Some women are so slow that it **
takes them about forty years to reach <?
the age of 25. 4
i >
PRUSSIAN INCOMES
ARE VERY LOW
n
BERLIN, March 3.?The Prussian n
iucome tax figures just published show
that 88 2-3 percent of all the Inhab- < *
1 itants earn less than $750 yearly; only n
f 8 1-5 per cent reach $1,375; 310 tax- 0
( payers paid taxes on incomes of more **
, than $125,000, and 87 declared in- < >
comes of more than $250,000. o
The figures show only trifling
' changes from the preceding year, ap- 0
? parently indicating no important rise o
in wages or salaries. <,
The population of Prussia In 1910 ' J
was a little over 40,000,000. Accord- 0
ing to the income tax figures, there- 0
1 fore, the number of persons in Prus- **
> sia earning more than $1,375, was ap- <;
? proximately, 3,280,000. Inasmuch as < ?
probably half the population are worn- o
en or children, having no income,
these statistics are less Indicative of
1 low earning power in Prussia than <>
they seem. ^
CORDOVA CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE ON THE JOB
On Feb. 26, the Cordova Chamber
of Commerce cabled President-elect j
Wilson, as follows:
"Ilespectlfully urge that con
struction railroad and opening re
sources Alaska along lines rec
ommended by Aluska Railroad
Commission in recent report, be
made a prominent feature of your
message to special session of Con
gress. Present conditions and re
strictions absolutely prohibit de
velopment. Alaska looks to your
administration for early relief."
Every thing that will please a amok j
er may be found at BUKFORD'S.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO I,. A. Moore, Berta Jarraa and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2.124 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1SS0, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum grouji of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group;
of placer claims, for the year ending!
December 31st, 11)12. for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you. within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of tlie cost
of said annual labor as required by
I law, and the cost of this notice, your
j interest in said group or groups of
I said claims will, in accordance with
i law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70.
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postotfice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 1. 191.1,
last publication June 1. 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
The Unique Millinery |
| LADIES'
FURNISHINGS |
I I 1 I 1 I I 1 I I I i
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
1111111111IIII11111111111111111111 If
I
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home I
? ?
aNothini( udd* more to the attractiveness of tin- homo than ,, .
alwell-appointed tabic. It helps to nuke the home the place , .
homo ouKht to be. And you would be surprised, perhaps. . .
how much it adds to the positive rdish of the meal. Wo , ,
make it easy for you to supply your bome-little by little, if , .
you like?with a tasteful pattern of si vorware. , ,
JLThese Roods are up-to-date and rnosi reliable of any made , .
Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mnrk t ,
Silverware Department of the
GORHAM CO. ? ?
UCHARICK^m^ I!
? 1111?i 11 II 111111111111111111111 1111
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
?"""??????????????'??
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Huildin^, Seattle
After March 15th at Room <1. Alaska
Steam l<aumlry Huililinx
! F. Wolland j
I Tailor f
1 ' 1
X Phone GG SECOND ST. j
REGISTRATION NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
registration books for the Municipal
and School Election, to be held on the
first Tuesday in April, 1913, are now
open at the oillce of Sowerby & Bell,
on Second street, between Seward
and Main streets, between the hours
of 9 and 4 each business day. The
books will be closed on Saturday the
29th day of March, 1913.
J. W. BELL,
Registration Oillcer.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5. 11. 17. 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Punter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et. Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9. 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15, 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9. 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWEIX, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Aluflka Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Aisflka Flyer
NORTHBOUND MARCH 14
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle OIHce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, A?ont
l-'l- !? 1 I' l1 l"l"l"l 1 11 M I M l-I I I I-I 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 !?
? ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY X
Safety, Service. Speaii Ticket* to Seattle, Tncomu Vic tor in and Vancouver. Through **
tickets to San Frnncwco
MARIPOSA Southbound FEB. 28 ;;
NORTHWESTERN Nort ib'd... M AR. 4 Southbound MAR. 10 ?
JEFFERSON Northbound MAR. 4 Southbound MAR. 5 "
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. |j*
!"l,il"li,l 1 ?! 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 I !?
I NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY \
S. S. A L K I S. S. NORTHL A N I) J
? FIRST CLASS FORE TO SEATTLE $19.00 X
? SECOND CLASS FARE TO SEATTLE $12.00 ?
l S. S. ALKI, SOUTH, MARCH 9 :
t ALLEN SHATTUCK, Agent 1
? Telephone?4-8 I
? C. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., JOHN HENSON, Agent X
Z Pier 4, Seattle Douglas t
--H I I II I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I i I I I I I I I I I II I I I II I I I I 1 I
ji ALASKA COAST CO. jj
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, .?
!! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
I! S. S. YUKON mar. 1 "
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA l!
11 connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports J j
? ? S. S. YUKON mar. 13 ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
Fop further information apply to
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ''
I i 111) M i i I {11 n i II i IIIII11II111111111111IIII n
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ?
4 STEAMERS FOR ?
SKATTIJ], TACOMA, f
* Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, 4
^ South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, J
0 Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ?
% C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. 4
? 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle ^
t Q Q C NORTHBOUND MARCH 4 J
0 Curacao southbound march 5 t
0 Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
0 "
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for I'ort Simpson, Prince Rupert. Swanson. Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Scuttle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 27
Front nnd Seward Sla. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKKTT, Aitt. j
-
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
I tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
I)oti idas und
Troadwell
?8:00 a. in.
9:00 a.m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
+:30 p. m.
0:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread -
well for
Juneau
?8 :25 a. in. I
9:25 a. m. |
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leavt'tt
DoukIhs for ,
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. |
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m*
3:30 p. re
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. ra.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
leaves Juneau daily
for Sheej) Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. ra.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
^^undn^chodul?M|am?Mi^ab<)Vc^xci2>nri^oavinj^Jun?nw^
?
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for ;;
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
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