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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 04, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE!
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA. TUESDAY. MARCH 4. 1913.
THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE
THERE is much food for thought in the message of Governor
Clark to the Legislature, the full text of which was printed
in The Empire yesterday. It is a comprehensive presenta
tion of existing conditions in the Territory, as viewed by the
Governor, and is worthy of the earnest consideration of the Leg
islature. The raising of revenue sufficient to meet the require
ments of the territorial government is a matter of prime import
ance. and the fact that the sources from which it can be derived
are limited, cannot be gainsaid. The question of taxation, there
fore. is one that will demand the most painstaking efforts of the
Legislature. The imposition of taxes shoudl be laid as equitably
as possible, with the constant view kept in mind that no industry
should be unduly taxed or discriminated against. In other
words, as Governor Clark points out. "it is a cardinal principle
of all just and wise tax measures that the rate of taxation must
not be so high as to impair the sources of revenue."
Alaska's industries should not be handicapped; encourage
ment is needed rather than the imposition of unjust, or unequal
burdens and The Empire believes that the members of the Leg
islature are alive to this fact. At the same time there are in
dustrial enterprises in Alaska which do not now, nor have they
ever contributaed their fair proportion of taxes to the territor
ial treasury, in return for the benefits they have received, and
the profits that have accrued to them. Both justice and equity
demand that those foreign corporations doing business in Alaska;
should bear their just proportion of taxation, but no more. As
they have never done this it is highly probable that strenuous
opposition will be developed to any proposal looking toward the
attainment of this end, this being particularly true of the for
eign salmon canning companies, which have greatly profited
through that industry while in no wise contributing their just
siutr of taxes in return for the privileges and protection that I
they enjoy.
Tin rv d of an adequate banking law, sanitation and health
prowv >. tiie establishment and enforcement of quarantine reg
u'ati ? . s. when necessary, vital statistics registration, compul
sory school attendance, the relief of destitution, mining law J
amenomen s. a serviceable miners' lien law, and other labor1
lavand r< vi>:.?r. of tin Alaska Code, are among the subjects
abb a: . dearly discussed by Governor Clark.
We submit that the message will bear careful analysis, and
we ar satisfied that such analysis will reveal the general sound
ness of the comments, suggestions and recommendations which
it contains. It is not too radical, and yet it is based upon pro
gressive lines, with a full realization of the conditions existing
in a pioneer country, the complex questions which confront a new
legislative body, hampered by many limitations.
LEGISLATIVE ELOQUENCE
TWO excellent speeches were made in the Legislature yester
day?one in the Senate by Colonel Millard, the other in the
House by Representative Ingersoll. Both are printed in full
in today's Empire. We commed them to the consideration of
Empire readers. Senator Millard's vision is prophetic; he dipped
into the future as far as human eyes can see, and briefly sketched
the Alaska of fifty or a hundred years hence. And with much
eloquence he compared the genesis of this republic with our
own first attempt at self-government in a Territory on the last
frontier.
"I am a Roman citizen," was the proudest boast of a Roman
in the palmy days of that once powerful republic ,but to Col
onel Millard and every patriotic American, "I am an American
citizen." is a more significant term than ever was uttered in
the grandest days of empurpled Rome.
Mr. Ingersoll combined fact and eloquence in his address,
and his exposition of Alaska affairs and the neglect and indif
ference. on the part of the Nation, which have been the lot of
the Territory, were portrayed in convincing language. Both
these speeches are worth preserving in the beginning of our
legislative history, and The Empire is glad to assist toward that
end.
MR. TAFT, THE MAN
PRESIDENT TAFT'S open confession is good for the soul.
"My sin," he is reported as saying, "is an indisposition' to
labor hard; my disposition is to procrastinate; my dispo
sition is to enjoy the fellowship of others more than I ought."
Mr. Taft spoke as atrue man, and he also spoke with the simplic
ity of a child, which revealed his true character. For while he
may not have risen to a great height as a statesman, while the
mistakes of his administration have been many, it must be said
of him that his sincerity was manifest, his purposes honest, and
his motives just. The genuine wholesomeness of the man will
bo. remembered and his mistakes as a statesman will be lost in
the limbo of forget fulness. His estimate of himself is frank,
open, candid, combined with a touch of pathos. Yet Mr. Taft
will bt a greater man in the estimate of the American people
a quarter of a century, or less, than he is today. When time has
mellowed the asperities of his day and abated the political ran
cor that has hedged him about, a true perspective of William
Howard Taft, the man and the patriot, will be had.
THE DOWNFALL OF THE TURK
T: RKF.Y now asks the intervention of the European powers,
of her own volition. A few weeks ago when the powers ten
dered their "kindly offices' to bring about a cessation of the
war with the Balkan States, Turkey would have none of it. The
London peace conference was a fiasco, as Turkey intended it
should be. That country wanted delay and got it, to some ex
tent, in the hope that her exchequer could in the meantime be
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I H-+
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Come and See Our
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I I CHARICK
J J JEWELER
and OPTICIAN
I>1 I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I
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GORHAM CO. ? ?
replenished with the sinews of war. In this she failed, and min
isterial crisis resulted in the return of the Young Turk party to
power, of which it had been temporarily deprived. The new
regime, however, has confessed its failure to prosecute the war
against the victorious allies. It was inevitable; and now Turkey
must at last submit to any terms that the powers may secure
from the Balkan States. And these are not likely to abate one
jot or tittle the demands they made through their peace commis
sioners in London. Practically there will be little left of Turkey
in Europe.
Greece, which alone, of the Balkan allies, did not sign the
armistice with Turkey, is the first to gain undisputed fruits of
victory, in the taking of Crete For 250 years this island was
under the Turks, and for every year of that time the people were
rebels. About Crete arose the disastrous war of 1897 and one
of its results was to place the coveted land under control of Great
Britain, Russia, Italy and France, as trustees, Austria and Ger
many remaining aloof. The four powers have now hauled down
their flags, and Crete is now an integral part of Greece.
Crete is as large as Delaware and Rhode Island together.
Its 300,000 inhabitants are Greek, and nine-tenths of them are
Christian. Their right to deliverance from the Turk is morally
clear; but no more so than that of most of the European terri
tory from which the Crescent flag has recently been driven.
Mr. Ingersoll's Speech
in House Yesterday
(Continued from Pago 1.)
making Its heart beat true to those
principles of justice, liberty and hu
manity upon which rests the prosper-'
ity and the safety and the glory of this
laud of the free.
"History again repeats itself. That
same distrust in the good sense and
calm judinent and the Intelligence of
the rank and file of the people as a
whole, that same disinclination to en-.
trust in the people at large direct par
ticipation in the administration of
' those affairs that concern their vital
interests, displayed by our forefathers
in framing the Constitution of the
United States, we read between the
lines of this instrument which is sup
posed to be the birthplace of Alas
kan independence.
"However, all through, this fact is
significant. That that same extreme
caution displayed by our forefathers in
the launching and the starting out
on its immortal journey of the great
Ship of State, In the trimming of the
sails to meet every shifting wind, and
the marking out of its course by chart
to avoid the sunken reefs and all the
dangers of an unknown sea,?that
same hesitant spirit, that same lack of
confidence in the Judgment and dis
cretion of the common people, we per
ceive upon the part of Congress to- \
wards this far distant land in this its
initial start upon the voyage of its
career.
"We believe that the verdict is not
justified by the facts, and we stand
before the bar of a nation's judg
ment. and we rest our hopes on an ap
peal to the enlightened view of its
second sober thought.
Great Possibilities.
"Generations may come, and gener
ations may go. Nations are born to
perish. But a land which draws its
life sustenance from this source can
never die.
"The day, however, is pregnant with
great possibilities. Whether it is that
Alaska is so large and her interests
so diversified that Congress has never
been able to reconcile our Inconsist
ent appeals, or whether it Is that that
same distrust which made of the Con
stitution a measure of compromise,
built seemingly upon property rights
at the expense of human rights,?It is
for us and us alone by the manner in
which we execute the trust reposed
in us to disprove the illusion and en
lighten the world of its fallacy and
misjudgment.
" 'He who does the best his cir
cumstance allows, does well, acts
nobly; Angels could do no more.'"
Every thing that will please a smok
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
~ NOTICE_
United States Commissioner's Court
for the District of Alaska, Divis
ion No. One, Juneau Precinct,
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of FRED
BROMAN, Deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Cimmissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Fred
Broman, deceased. All persons having
claims against said estate are here
by notified to present them, with the
proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence on the Beach Road at
Douglas. Alaska.
Dated this first day of March, 1913.
L. A. SLANE,
Administrator.
GARBAGE NOTICE
Notice is hereby given tlint the un
dersigned transfer companies will on
March 1, 1913, refuse to handle gar
bage, and all customers are requested
to apply to the Alaska Transfer Com
pany for such services.
JUNEAU TRANSFER CO.,
FEMMER & RITTER,
M. D. BERRY, 3-3-121
HILLARY -McKEXXA TRANSFER
Finest line of Calabash pipes in
Alaska at BURFORD'S
SEAL SHIPT OYSTERS?Freeh at i
the local agency?CHAS. GOLDSTEIN
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
i
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarma and
Fred Stevenson: Von and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice. pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your!
interest In said group or groups of,
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice:
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postoffice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer,
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 1, 1913,
last publication June 1, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
_______________________________ ?
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
?127 Walker Huildinj;, Seattle
After March 15th at Room 6. Alnnkn
Steam Laundry Building
; :
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
REGISTRATION NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
registration books for the Municipal
and School Election, to be held on the
first Tuesday in April, 1 !> 13, are now
open at the olllce of Sowerby & Bell,
on Second street, between Seward
and Main streets, between the hours
of 1) and I each business day. The
books will be closed on Saturday the
29th day of March, 1913.
J. W. BELL,
Registration Officer.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5. 11. 17. 23, 29,
Dec. 5. 11, 17. 23. 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9. 15, 21. 27,
March 5. 11, 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and j
Chatham, 8:00 a. rn.?Nov. 17, j
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 2S, Feb. 21. :
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21. March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove. Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9. 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21, 27. Jan. 2. 8. 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25. March
3, 9, 15, 21. 27. |
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWKLL. MANAGER
I
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. HUMBOLDT I The AUekn Flyer
NORTHBOUND MARCH 14
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ofllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BUKFOKD, Agent
-
i- !? I i 1 i I i i 1 i I i ! 1 i I I 1 I I 1 I I I 1 1 1 i I I 1 1 1 I I I
f\? ALASKA !
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
?j* Safuty, Service, Spord Ticket* to Scuttle, Tacorna. Victoria and Vancouver. Through
t ticket* to San Franciaco
MARIPOSA Southbound FEB. 22 ?;
t NORTHWESTERN Northb'd.. .MAR. 4 Southbound MAR. 10 ~
t JEFFERSON Northbound MAR. 4 Southbound MAR. 5 "
j Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. ;;
?;-:-:-h-h-h-h-h-i ?h-h-m i i m i m i i -i i h I I m i m i ?! m m !?
I NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY ij
t S. S. A L K I S. S. N O It T H L A N I) I
* O
<? FIRST CLASS FORE TO SEATTLE $19.00 o
0 < ?
* SECOND CLASS FARE TO SEATTLE $12.00 ?
1 S. S. ALKI, SOUTH, MARCH 9 ij
ALLEN SHATTUCK, Agent ^
? Telephone?4-8
* C. C. BRADFORD. Mgr., JOHN HENSON, Agent ?
* Pier 4, Seattle Douglas J
* ?
-i-M-frfrH I II i I I t I { I I I I I I I H I II I i H 1 i ? I I I I I I II I I I II II I II
:: ALASKA COAST CO. jj
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? >
I! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON MAR. 1
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA i!
connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports ' j
;; S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 ??
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ??
For further information apply to '1
? ? it
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ??
i lllllllllllll I-Ml i I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
P A C I F I C C 0 AST S T E A MSHIP CO. J
t STEAMERS FOR ?
SKATTI.H, T.U'OMA, |
? Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, +
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, 2
0 Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ?
% C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. 2
? 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 115 James Street, Seattle 2
? C C ?* NORTHBOUND MARCH 4 I
e O. O. Curacao SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5 \
$ 2
0 Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ?
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C. Coast Service
Sailing from Juneau for Porl Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swannon. Alert Ray, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB, 27
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE j.t.spickrtt. aki.
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE ^
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS. TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
l,v. Juneau for
Douglas and
Trcadwell
*8:00 a. ir..
9:00 a. ir.. j
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m. I
4:30 p. m.
0:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m. I
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trcad
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. ]
' 12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
I 3:25 p.m.
4:55 p.m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Loaves
Doutrlas for
Juneau
*8:30 a.m. :
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m. I
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m. ?
9:30 p.m. j
11:30p.m. '
Iycnvc? Juneau daily
for Shecj) Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. rn.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Niitht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same above, except trip leaving Juneau at s a. m. is omitted |
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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