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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 05, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oce year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 6.00
Per month, delivered 100
JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1913
PRESIDENT WILSON.
WOODROVV WILSON is now President of the United States.
His Cabinet has been selected. The Congress is Democrat
ic in both branches. The new Administration begins its
course under favorable auspices. It has the endorsement of the
people and much is expected of it. The Democratic party has
been again taken on trust after sixteen years spent in the wilder
ness. Its triumph at the polls was the result of the Republican
party's indifference to the demands of the people. Drunk with
long-continued power its leaders became a law unto themselves.
They disregarded the changing conditions of the times in their
lust for power. They became bourbons through the process of
devolution. They ceased to learn and they could not forget the
long, fat years of continuous supremacy. Detruncation followed
with the birth of the Progressive party, and today the historic
Republican party, once so firmly entrenched, ranks next to the
Socialist.
In these facts the Democracy should learn its lesson. Bour
bonism is no longer a factor in national politics. It long since
was proved to be a fungus growth on the body politic. Yet it
is not quite dead, as witnesses the Republican debacle. It may
also be found in splotches here and there within the Democratic
party, though shorn of its former prestige and influence. It was
scourged at Baltimore, but though bruised it is not entirely |
broken. And it may be expected to show its head now and then,
and perhaps Its teeth, notwithstanding the clear and positive dec
larations of the Democratic national platform, and the avowed
progressive policies as enunciated by President Wilson. But his
Administration will undoubtedly meet troubled waters. The
party of which he is now the national leader has promised much
and the people who entrusted it with power are going to de
mand the redemption of every pledge, as they should. The tar
iff must be revised, not in the interests of its beneficiaries, but
in the interest of the great mass of consumers. There are many
Democratic tariff beneficiaries as well as Republican and Pro
gressive: and when their sacred idol is threatened they are usual
ly found united in the common cause of plunder. These are party
men for profit only: to them patriotism and pelf are synono
mous. A Democratic administration must curb them by tariff
reductions, and the complete control of trusts and combinations
of which the high-protective tariff has been the wet-nurse. These,
we conceive, to be the two most important problems the right
solution of which confronts President Wilson and his party. But
there are many others of vital importance to the country, and if
they be met and solved courageously and honestly the Demo
cratic party will be assured of a long continuance of power. But
if the contrary course is pursued the overthrow of the party will
be complete four years hence, and it may not again expect to re
ceive the confidence of the people, but another will take its place.
An administration marked with wisdom, and the keenest
knowledge and appreciation of the country's needs may be ex
pected from President Wilson. He has courage; he has ability
of a high order: he is a patriot of a fine type and behind him
he has the best wishes of the American people, and we are con
fident that he will not be found wanting, and that his adminis
tration will be such as will make progressive history for the na
tion.
PRESIDENT WILSON'S CABINET.
THERE are at least two national figures in President Wil
son's official family, and a number of others who are well
up to the front. Of course William Jennings Bryan is the
premier, and perhaps next to him in the public eye is Frank
lin K. Lane, of California, Secretary of the Interior. For a num
ber of years Mr. Lane has been a member of the Interstate Com
merce Commission, and his work there has given him a national
reputation. Some twenty-five years ago he was a hard-working
newspaper man in Tacoma.
Postmaster-General Burleson, of Texas, has served in Con
gress for many years, and is a man of commanding ability.
William G. McAdoo, of New York, may be also said to be a
man of national reputation. He originated the idea of build
ing railroad tunnels under the Hudson river, and carried it to
successful completion, and at the same time he showed himself
to be a financial genius. He came out of the South a young and
unknown man, and by the sheer force of genius achieved mon
umental successwithin a few brief years.
James C. McReynolds, the Attorney-General, comes from
Tennessee, and he served as an assistant attorney-general for a
short time, under Attorney-General Bonaparte, in President
Roosevelt's administration.
The new Secretary of Commerce, William C. Redfield, is a
manufacturer of Brooklyn, N. Y. He is an ardent tariff re
former and is besides a tariff expert. He was a member of the
Sixty-second Congress.
Josephus Daniels, of North Carolina, who has been selected
for the Navy portfolio, is a newspaper publisher and editor of that
State, and this is his first appearance in national affairs; he is a
cultured man of wide experience, however.
Lindley M. Garrison, of New Jersey, Secretary of War
is unknown to national fame, but he has been closely identified
with President Wilson in his fight for the regeneration of New
Jersey.
W. B. Wilson, Secretary of Labor, has been a member of
Congress from the Fifteenth Pennsylvania district, for a num
ber of years, and has been closely identified with the labor cause.
Of the new Secretary of Agriculture, David F. Houston, of
Missouri, The Empire knows nothing. He is not found in "Who's
Who." but he will no doubt prove acceptable successor to "Tama
Jim" Wilson, who has presided over the Agricultural Depart
ment for sixteen years.
II11111II111111IIIII11II111 Ill
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home 111
Nothing adds more to the attractiveness of the homo than ) J
a well-appointed table. It helps to make the home the place \
home ought to be. And you would la- surprised. perhaps, [
how much it adds to the' positive relish of the meal. We \ )
make it easy for you to supply your home-little by little, if ' '
you like?with a tasteful pattern of silverware.
_Thcae jtoods are up-to-date and most reliable of any mnde j [
iComc and See Our
Silverwnre Department
UCHAR1CK
aj JEWELER
and OPTICIAN
I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I It'
Look for the Trade Mark ( _
of the ' 1
GORHAM CO. i i
A PIRATICAL TRUST
SUPPORTING a motion for arrest of judgment in the case of
Cash-Register Trust convicts, their lawyers presented the
familiar plea of monopoly that the Sherman law "creates
new crimes."
Are bribery, false pretense, intimidation, slander, discrim
ination, forestalling and monopoly new crimes? It was proved
against the Cash-Register Trust that it bribed the employees of
competitors and of railroad and telegraph companies that it
maintained fraudulent "competition;" that by threats and libel
lous attacks upon the credit of its true competitors it brought
them to ruin; that it kept a "graveyard" exhibit of competitive
machines which it had put out of business, always open to the
inspection of inventors and investors who comtemplate compe
tition; that is missused the patent laws in order to harass its
rivals; that when competitors would not close out their enter
prises at its order it destroyed them by cutting prices below
cost, and that all of these acts were the result of a conspiracy,
deliberate and long-continued
In twenty years the trust broke up 150 competing manu- j
facturers and established its monopoly so securely that it now
controls more than 95 per cent of the business. 'Whether we ex
amine the offenses above named in detail or take them all to-;
gether as showing intent to monopolize an industry, the crimes
involved at every stage, and the great central crime to which ;
they all lead, are not new crimes but old crimes, as old, indeed,
as the common law.
CRIPPLE CREEK,
IN INNOKO DISTRICT
i
Fred Anderson, a former resident of
Iditarod. has written a letter from
' Cripple, the new camp on the Innoko,
| telling of the progress which has
been made there during the past
month or more.
The letter, which was written to
Anderson's partner, savs that in the
bottom of a shaft recently sunk on
Cripple creek, the sum of $14 was
cleaned up. and that much of the
gold was of large size, some of the
pieces weighing sixty cents.
Anderson claims that a real pay
streak has been uncovered on Colo
rado creek, in the same region. The
ground is shallow, and the pay thus
far found averages from two to three
cents to the pan. which is a good
thing, considering the ease with which
the ground can be worked.
On Cripple creek the pay had been
located in three places at the time the
letter was written, and Anderson
stated that they were expecting to
find more pay soon.
Those who know Anderson, say that
what he says can be relied upon, and
the good report has aroused consider
able interest at Iditarod and the near
vicinity, though it is doubtful if any
Iditaroders will leave for the new
camp on the strength of the news con
tained in the letter.
SCOTT FOUND PLANT
LIFE AT THE POLE
CHRISTCHURCH, N. Z., March 5.?
According to information given out by
Commander Evans, of the Terra Nova.
Lieutenant Scott found at the South
Pole many plant fossils which are of
a variety grown in temperate climates.
From their nature and from other
signs which he found the famous ex
plorer was of the opinion that at some
time the land of South America and
Australia extended clear to the Ant
arctic regions.
At several places they were annoyed
by the gaseous fumes that came from
1!
THE
Underwood
TYPEWRITER
'The machine you will eventually
buy'
R. C. BRUCHMAN
Special Representative at Occi
dental Hotel
NOTICE
United States Commissioner's Court
for the District of Alaska, Divis
ion No. One, Juneau Precinct,
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of FRED
BROMAN, Deceased.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Cimmissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Fred
Broman, deceased. All persons having
claims against said estate are here
by notified to' present them, with the
proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence on the Beach Road at
Douglas, Alaska.
Dated this first day of March, 1913.
L. A. SI.ANE,
Administrator.
under the ice and which were evident-!
ly from volcanos underneath the gla
ciers. When in the vicinity of Mt.
Erebus the explorers were particular
ly annoyed by the sulphur fumes.
Finest line of Calabash pipes in
Alaska at BURFORD'S
SEAL SHIFT OYSTERS?Freeh at
the local agency?CHAS. GOLDSTEIN
Every thing that will please a smok-1
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. .Moore, Berta Jartna and
[ Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all j
? the necessary labor as required by See-!
lion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
, December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth In
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarrna is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
I one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group: and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
| interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice; -
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofilce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 1, 1913,
last publication June 1, 1913.
j ANDREW JOHNSON.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORN EYSAT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Huildin^, Seattle
After March 15th nt Room C. Alaska
Steam l-auiulry IiuildinK
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics. Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
REGISTRATION NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
registration books for the Municipal
and School Election, to be held on the
first Tuesday in April, 1913, are now
open at the office of Sowerby & Bell,
on Second street, between Seward
and Main streets, between the hours
of 9 and 4 each business day. The
books will be closed on Saturday the
29th day of March, 1913.
J. W. BELL,
Registration Officer.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m? Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5. 11. 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4. 10.
16. 22. 28. Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. in.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11. Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21.
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21. March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor.
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21. 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3. 9. 15, 21. 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOW ELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
(
The Alaska Flyer HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND MARCH 14
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, A^ent
?i~!"l"H~i-H.^-;~HiiIiiliil1'!1 l-I-M1!11! ?! ?1,I I I I I I I I I I 1 I 1 1 I I I I I-H-H-H-M
I' ? ALASKA 1
STEAMSHIP COMPANY f
Safety, Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma. Victoria ami Vancouver. Through T*
? ? tickets to San Francisco T
MARIPOSA Southbound FEB. 28 V
NORTHWESTERN Northb'd... MAR. 4 .Southbound MAR. 10 |
;; JEFFERSON Northbound MAR. 4 Southbound MAR. 5
I * * *i*
+ Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. V
M X
I ?! 1- I-I-I-l-1 I I 1 I-1 I-1-1 1 I 1 II 1 1 I I 1 I 1 1 1 1 I I I 1 1
'?> & I rfoTB B t A EV I |pv Allan Shattuck. Agent, Offices ?
i nltJK I OlAnlU with juneau Transfer c?- |
o Z
p. I ? John Henson, Douglas Agent ?
| Steamship Company ?
" ?
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU i
O 1
? Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, MARCH 9 J
? r* j. C 1.1.1 First Class $19.00 t
% rare to oeattle second ciass $12.00 ?
I ! I I II I I M I ) It I t H M I I I I II I I I I I I ? I t tl I I I I
ALASKA COAST CO. j!
J For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, .,
Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU 1!
X s. S. YUKON MAR. 1 "
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA \\
T connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j;
J S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 '?
r Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
+ For further information apply to
i S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ? ?
1 I i II I I H 111 1 I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
? PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. j|
? STEAMERS-FOR
Sl-LVTTIj;, TACOMA, ?<;
? Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, o
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, \'
O Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ][
? C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle o
SQ NORTHBOUND MARCH 4 o
? Curacao SOUTHBOUND MARCH 5
I ^
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt.
I
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastServicc
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swanaon, Alert Bay, Vuncouvcr
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 27
Front and Seward Sts. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J t. spickktt, akl
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Dougliui and
Tread well
*8:00 a. n:. I
9:00 a. m. |
11:00 a. m. |
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p in.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. in.
Lv. Trend -
well for
Juneau
*S:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. in.
Leaves
DoukIus for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. I
9:30 a. m.
; 12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
?9:30 p. in.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
^Jot Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
?
Leaves Sheep
I
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
6:10 p. m.
r rum jumnu ior
Shcop Creek
Saturday Niifht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p^m.
Sunday Schedule same ns above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. i? omitted |
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWCLL GOLD MINING CO.

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