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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 14, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the poetottlco at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. IS79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
0?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered l.Ou
JUNEAU. ALASKA. FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1913.
GOV. SULZER AND MURPHY
THE break between Gov. William Sulzer. of New York, and
Leader Charles F. Murphy, of Tammany, was inevitable. Sul
zer is and always has been in close touch with the progres
sive element of the people. The machine methods of the Tam
many chieftain are abhorrent to those from whom New York's
new governor has received his inspiration, and when the latter
found Murphy's henchmen and Murphy's methods permeating
all the departments and bureaus of the State it is no surprise to
those who know him that a house-cleaning should begin. That it
did begin so early in his administration augurs well for the con
tinued success of the governor and of progressive Democracy in
ihe Empire State.
The people of New York State are not different from those
of other States. Give them a leader that will direct their efforts
and they will go just as far toward making their State pro
gressive as the people of New Jersey, New Hampshire and other
Eastern States have gone.
Gov. Sulzer is not only doing well for his State, but he is
doing good politics. Former Gov. John A. Dix's fate should dem
onstrate this fact to the most obtuse. He had the same oppor
tunity that came to Gov. Sulzer. but he did not grasp it. He
turned the State over to Murphy, and the result was that a year
after his election, through a tremendous Democratic landslide,
the Republicans carried the legislative election by a majority
more emphatic than any they had received in many years. It
took a Baltimore convention, a Woodrow Wilson and a resultant
landslide again to give the Democrats'an opportunity to do what
Gov. Dix had not done. Fortunately for the party and for the
State of New York a Sulzer was carried into the governor's
chair by the second victory of his party, and for the first time
since Cleveland and Hill Tammany's boss has been driven out of
the capital, and told that henceforth he must confine his activ
ities. if. indeed, he shall be permitted to remain active at all, to
the affairs below Harlem. The humiliation of the Democratic
party in New York dates from the ascendency of Tammany in
it. It ceased to be a force for good when the Tammany leaders
assumed the directing hand in its affairs, and the people would
have none of it.
? ' ' ? * Li. -1 A L..
The situation that is oeing urougru awui uj uuv. ou^a
is even more hopeful than that of the days of Cleveland and
Hill, for Gov. Sulzer has powerful support in the Tammany or
ganization itself in addition to a large following in the metropo
lis that is his because those that compose it know him and be
lieve in him. There are thousands of young men?educated men
of standing in the professional callings and the business world
?members of the Tammany organization who are thoroughly
progressive and who approved of the drubbing Bryan gave Mur
phy at Baltimore. All these men require as an inducement to
assert themselves is a leader such as Gov. Sulzer is proving him
self to be. and it is a good guess that within another two years
Murphy will be making the fight of his busy lifetime to retain]
the leadership of Tammany and that he will have no time to med
dle in bigger politics at all.
In the meantime, the whole country is profiting. New York
is so emphatically the hub of this continent that its local af
fairs are matters of public interest everywhere, and a good ex
ample there is worth much throughout the Nation. Let the
good work go on. The prayers of all supporters of good govern
ment are with Gov. Sulzer.
The people of Alaska must not think that because the Alas
ka Legislature is holding short sessions and has passed no bills
that its members are not working or that the first session will
be a do-nothing meeting. The members of the legislature are
giving serious attention to the business that brought them to
the capital, and The Empire is confident that they will work
out solutions for most of their problems before departing for their
homes. They are men of ability and all of them thorough Alas
kans. The fact that they are going slow and giving much time
to deliberation and consultation speaks in favor of their capacity
rather than against them. ?
SEPARATION A PROBABLE SOLUTION
IT NEED create no great surprise if the final solution of the dif
ficulties in harassed Mexico shall be dismemberment. Except
in the cases of Mexico and Brazil it has been impossible,
seemingly, for any great number of the Spanish Americans or
any great area of the territory populated by them to continue
long as one nation. Distrust and suspicion combined with am
bition and intrigue are natural traits of this adventuresome peo
ple, and those are not the traits that count for co-operation and
stability. The South American Spaniards had hardly deprived
the mother country of its authority in the Western continent be
fore they fell to quarreling among themselves over the powers
of government, and a dozen small nations were born. The result
has been that in some of them, in most instances those of small
est area, there has been peace for comparatively long periods of
time. Factional differences are being developed in Mexico that
will make it more and more difficult again to unite the several
States of the republic on a basis that will be sufficiently satis
factory to all. It would have been better, probably, for the Mex
ican people if the American boundary had been established
farther south a half century ago.
By a vote of twenty-nine to nine the British Columbia Leg
islature defeated woman suffrage. Dr. Young, member from At
lin and Minister of Education in the Cabinet of Premier Richard
McBride, supported the measure.
The people of Alaska will follow the work of Gov. Sulzer
in New York with greater interest, probably, than those of any
other section of the country outside of his own State, because he
is almost an Alaskan himself. He has spent much of his time in
this territory, has invested largely of his money here, and has
been our best friend at Washington and in the East. His suc
cesses are those of one of our own people. More power to him.
President Wilson will not permit anything .to be done that
will subject his administration to the charge of nepotism. The
Democratics of Washington and Oregon have urged the appoint
ment of Capt. A. M. Wilson as commissioner to the Philippines.
"Capt. Wilson is a cousin of mine," the President is represented
as having said, " and that makes it absolutely impossible for
me to consider his application for appointment. I shall feel
barred from appointing any member of my own family to office."
The impression prevails in Washington that in contests for
place from the Wilson administration original progressive Dem
ocrats will have all the best of the argument to start with. It is
believed by newspaper correspondents at the National Capital
that the applicants for positions from the State of Washington,
having the endorsement of the original Wilson men, will be
the lucky ones.
POINTED PARAGRPHS
The best of meu are sometimes
worsted?and that's no yarn.
? ? ?
Silly people are usually happy, but I
not all happy people are silly.
? ? ?
No inventor has been able to pro- j
duce a noiseless llat wheel as yet.
? ? ?
It's the esaiest thing in the world'
to instruct another how to do things.
* * *
Many a slow man develops into a
sprinter when he has a chance to run
into debt.
* * a
Anyway, the man who follows your
advice always has some one to blame
if he fails.
? ? ?
While the season's always open for,
fortune hunting, few of the hunters
are good shots.
* * *
In some circles, men are like pi
anos?if square they are considered
old-fashioned.
* ?. *
When a woman goes into a cigar
store with a man, she feels much as j
the man does when he goes with the
woman to buy hat pins at a bargain
counter.
NOTICE OF MUNICIPAL ELECTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
municipal election for the election of
seven (7) councilmen to serve for the
ensuing year will be held at Juneau on
Tuesday, the first day of April, A. D.
1913.
The election will be held at the Mu
nicipal Council Chamber on Third i
street, between Seward and Franklin
streets, and the polls will be open on
said first day of April, 1913, between ?
the hours of 9 a. m. and 7 p. m.
The qualifications of an Elector for
Councilmen shall be as follows: He
shall be a male citizen of the United
States, or one who has declared his
intention to become such, of the age
of twenty-one years and over, and
shall have been a bona fide resident of
Alaska for one year, and of the City
of Juneau for six (6) months next
oreceding the date of his election, and
shall have registered in accordance
with the provisions of the Ordinance.
NOTICE is further given that Ben
Bullard, John A. Winn and John Ken
nedy have been appointed Judges of
said election and that Allen Shattuck
and Thos. Mauzey have been appoint
ed Clerks of said election.
A. W. FOX,
(SEAL) City Clerk.
First date of publication March 10,
'ast publication, March 31, 1913.
NOTICE OF SCHOOL ELECTION ?<
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That o
an election will be held for School
Treasurer, to serve for three years, 0
on Tuesday, the first day of April, 1913. n
The election will be held at the Mu- |[
nicipal Council Chamber on Third 0
street, between Seward and Franklin < >
streets; and the polls will be open on y
said first day of April, 1913, between 0
the hours of 9 a. m. and 7 p. m. on <>
said day and at said place.
The following persons shall be qual- , >
ifled electors for School Board: All o
adults who are citizens of the United ][
States, or who have declared their In- 0
tention to become such, and who are <?
residents of Juneau School District, * J
and shall have registered in conform- < ,
Ity with the provisions of the Ordi- n
nance. A. W. FOX.
(SEAL) City Clerk.
First date of publication March 10, o
last publication, March 31, 1913. ^
NOTICE
o
United States Commissioner's Court ?
for the District of Alaska, Divls- <>
Ion No. One, Juneau Precinct, o
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of FRED o
BROMAN, Deceased. * |
i >
NOTICE is hereby given that the o
undersigned has been, by the United ][
States Cimmi8sioner, Probate Judge o
of the above entitled court, by an or- <?
der duly made and entered, appoint- y
ed administrator of the estate of Fred
Broman, deceased. All persons having <?
claims against said estate are here
by notified to present them, with the . .
proper vouchers and in legal form, ][
within six (6) months from the date o
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence on the Beach Road at
Douglas, Alaska. . o
Dated this first day of March, 1913. ?
L. A. SLANE, ^
Administrator.
CONNECTICUT GIRL
LIKES HER NAME
NEW YORK, March 13?When Miss
Celia Cohen, of Dorchester, Con., was
twenty-five she determined that she
would not marry anyone if it involved
her changing her name. Her mother's
maiden name was Cohen, and both of
her grandmothers were Cohens before
their marriage. Her sister married a
Cohen. She turned down two flatter
ing proposals because the would-be
grooms were not Cohens. A short
time ago a Dorchester young man,
named Cohen, pressed his love suit.
"His name was Cohen," said Miss
Cohen, "and I allowed him to pay some
attention to me." The engagement
of Miss Cohen was announced at a
party last night when it was discov
ered that her fiance's mother's maiden
name was Cohen. All those at the
engagement party were Cohens.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarmy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 18S0, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you. within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
Interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofilce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
REGISTRATION NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the ?
registration books for the Municipal 4
and School Klection, to be held on the 1
first Tuesday in April, 1913, are now ?
open at the office of Sowerby Bell, t
on Second street, between Seward 4
and Main streets, between the hours 4
of 9 and 4 each business day. The i
books will be closed on Saturday the 4
29th day of March, 1913. O
J. W. BELL, <
Registration Officer. J
0
c
The Juneau Steamship Co. ?
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. in.. Nov. 6, 11, 17, 23, 29,
. Dec. r?, 11, 17. 23. 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28. Feb. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27,
March 5. 11. 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22, 1
Feb. 21. March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m. |
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21. 27, Jan. 2. 8, 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13. 19. 25, March
3. 9, 15, 21. 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
II II I I I I I I I I II tl I H I II I I I 1 I I I I H I I
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home !!
Nothing ndds more to tho attractiveness of the home than , ,
u well-appointed table. It helps to make the home the place , ,
homo ousrht to be. And you would bo surprised, perhaps. , .
how much it adds to the positive relish of the meal. We , ,
make it easy for you to supply your home?little by little, if , ,
you llko?with a tasteful pattern of silverware. ? ?
These Roods are up- to-date and most reliable of any made . ,
I Come and See Our Look for tho Trade Mnrk , ,
Silverware Department of tho J '
GORHAM CO. ? ?
and OPTICIAN / ? ?
11111111II11111ll111111111111111 li I:
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
i
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau ^
Gunnison & Marshall |
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW I
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau 4
?
N. WATANABE I
DENTIST t
Office Over Purity Pharmacy ?
Juneau ... Alaska
I
JOHN B. DENNY ?
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW ?
Mining and Corporation Law ?
Offices: Juneau, Alaska +
Seattle, Wash. ^
?
? - .
J. F. EVERETT ^
ARCHITECT
?127 Walker Buildinjr, Seattle
After March 15th at Room 0. Alnxka ' '
Steam Laundry Huildinfr
; W.H.Cleveland P.J.Cleveland ) ?
CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS ; !
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request \
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU \
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. !
I
Tho Alu.-kn Flyer ?. HUMBOLDT The Alaaka Flyer J
? I
NORTHBOUND MARCH 14
SOUTHBOUND MARCH 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Oflicc, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BUKFOKD, Agent
1 1 M 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 ! 1 I M !? M 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 11 11 1 1 M'l
\ ? ALASKA I
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service, Speed Ticket* to Seattle. Tnroma. Victoria and Varicoiiver. Throuyh ?'
ticket* to San Francixco
JEFFERSON Northbound MAR. 14 Southboeid MAR. 15
NORTHWESTERN Southbound MAR. 12 .i'
MARIPOHA Southbound MAR. 13 Southbound MAR. 19 j
T
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt.
^HH^H--l"l"l--l"HH-HH~;-l~H-'H--H-i!"l l-1!-!11 ?! Ml-l-M-H 11 111 I 1 111 i
& 3 tf\ iT^HST P fl I Sk R | |\ Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office j
1^1^/jj I | | I ^1 1^ with Juneau Transfer Co. 1
ft ? ? r* John Henson, Douglas Agent f
Steamship Company i
REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU t?
<>
Southbound Sailings S.S. ALKI, Mar. 20, Apr. 2 j:
T? jl C 1.1.I First Class $19.00 <;
rare to oeattie second ciass $12.00 ?
-1.11; ii11 n 1ii1111 m i m 111; i i m it 1111111111 m 1111111
ALASKA COAST CO. I
JL
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ??
Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU l\
S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON MARCH 30
S. S. YUKON MARCH 24 ??
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA \\
S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON MARCH 18 ?;
S. S. YUKON MAR. 13 .\
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice, v
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
MI i i ? I 1 I I I II I I I i I I I I I II M M I I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I II
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. j
STEAMERS FOR 1
sjsattlk, tacoma, f
| Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend,
South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, T
> Anacortcs, Los Angeles and San Diego. 1
! C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. J
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle t
SQ Q 1 NORTHBOUND MARCH 17 J
? O. opokane SOUTHBOUND MARCH 18 <?
Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swnnson. Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK, MARCH 12
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT. Ajrt.
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Doujflas and
Trendwell
?8:00 a.m. '
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a.m. :
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
. 9:00 p. m.
11:00 p.m. ]
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
*8:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. |
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Douiclas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. ra.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p.m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m. ||
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p.m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m. I
leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
fr rom Junrau ior
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nitrht Only
[ 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves;
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m. ?
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule name as above, except trip leaving Juneac nt 8 n. m. in omitted |
I
<?
o
We Are Headquarters for :
if
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
- ----- O
4 >
4 ?
4>
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS I
4 >
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
< >
4 ?
..
. ?
, , . >
? ?
4 ?
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING Ca
. ? 4?
4 >
4 >
4 ?
4 >
4 >
4 >
4 ?
4 ?
4 >

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