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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 26, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-03-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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: JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. ?
' 1 z
^ We have for the table the T
t CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES !
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH j
| Tel. 9-1 RYE AND BOURBON Front st. 1
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER'
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
?^???????
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
(ias Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Kegal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY J?>? ??*. .Mgr. |
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
.Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Haras and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
| Juneau Transfer Co. ?
J COAL WOOD |
| STORAGE ?
J Moving Carefully Done ?
? Baggage Our Long Suit ?
I FRONT STREET ?
T f
? Watkins 8 Gerdon ?
? EXPERT BLACKSMITHS ?
t and IRON WORKERS J
? General Blacksmithing. Horse- ?
+ Shoeing. Iron and Marine Work 4
t Estimates Furnished and T
? Work Guaranteed ?
J FRANKLIN STREET ?
? Near Alaska Steam Laundry ^
??????????????????????????
I McCloskeys |
? ?
? ?
I :
t :
? ?
? ?
t. t. r, t. r r t, ti r..r..r..T
j; The Louvre Bar ::
11 A1 Carlson. Prop. ~~ ..
Imported and* Dome* tic ??
:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS
|| RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT "
Phone 3-3-5 Juneau ??
* '?! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 1 I I'
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
Stationery Store
Dealer in all kinds of station
ery. office supplies, typewriter
supplies.
Agent for the
L. C. Smith & Bro. Type
writer
I i
I P. Wolland |
| Tailor |
X Phone 66 SECOND ST. <?
L? I
Berry's Store
EASTER GOODS
Arriving on Every Boat
-
n 111111 ii 111 n 1111111111
? The Alaska Grill
! The^Beit Appointed
^Place in Town J
;; Best of Everything Served !
i at Moderate Prices ;;
1111111111 n 11 ii t n 11111
- I
? THE BEST LOAF OF
I* BREAD |
Is Sold At I
San Francisco Bakery ?
G. MESSERSCHMIDT. Prop. J
'"l
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Casbier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
?
? I
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
THE ORPHEUM GETS GREATEST EILM
Starting Thursday the Orpheum
Theatre will exhibit what is conceded
to be the peer of all feature ill m pro
ductions. Homer's Odyssey presages
a new era in tllui making. It thrills
und staggers imagination and the most
remarkable of all is the fact of getting
giant's lone eye with It. They thou
escape by binding each other under
bheep belonging to the giunt. After
the voyagers are safely in their boat
they throw back taunts to the enraged
giant, who in a fit of extreme anger
breaks off the top of a mountain and
such wonderful, living, breathing, sen-|
sationul realism into moving pictures.;
The history of the great work has been
handed down from father to son for i
the last 5,000 years and it is no doubt
quite familiar to the majority of Ju
neau people. The film depicts in a,
most vivid manner how Ulysses and
his companions after falling into the j
hands of the mamoth cave dwelling
giant Cyclopes, light the sharp end of
a tree by the fire and put out the I
luirls at the ship, just missing it.
Continuing the little band of Ulysses
encounter many strange adventures,
and it sets one wondering how it is
possible to photograph such enorm
ities.
The production is in three reels of
three thousand feet of gorgeously tint
ed colored film and will surely be a
big surprise to the picture goers who
see it. The regular show will be run
in addition to this special.
SCENE FROM HOMER'S ODVSSEVAT ORPHBUM THEATRE TOMOR
ROW NIGHT
WRANGELL BOOSTS
STICKINE ROUTE
The Wrangell Chamber of Com
merce has issued a pamphlet setting
forth the advantages of the Wrangell
Stikine route to the new gold diggings,
which they call the "Nahlin Placer
Strike," but which hjis been variously
described as the "Teslin." Jennings
river," or "Silver Creek" districts by
others. The Wrangell business men
represent that the distance for the
overland trip, from Telegraph creek,
on the Stikine, to be 115 miles.
The circular, in part, reads:
"In vew of the conflicting reports in
circulation in regard to the extent and
; exact location of the recent placer
gold discovery northeast of Wrangell
i in British Columbia, the Wrangell
Chamber of Commerce feel it due to
themselves and the public to make a
statement pertaining to the special
advantages of the route to the new
strike via Wrangell and Telegraph
creek( over all other routes recom
mended from other sources. The
Wrangell Chamber of Commerce is
not. at this early date, in a position
to con Arm or deny the discovery of
gold in paying quantities. None
of the parties who have staked claims
appear to have come out as yet, ex
cept the Indian. Skookum Jim, who
is understood, on good authority, to
have one claim recorded on each of
the three new creeks discovered.
Location and Trails
"The Chamber of Commerce is, how
ever. reliably informed that 305 claims
have been recorded on four new
creeks, including 107 claims on Sil
ver creek. Silver creek and the three
other creeks mentioned are now defi
nitely known to be on the headwaters
of Teslin River, flowing out of Level
Mountain just across a low divide from
the Nahlin river, and about 25 miles
east of the Telegraph creek-Teslin
Lake pack trail, at the point where
the trail crosses the Nahlin river. The
Teslin trail runs between Telegraph
creek and Teslin Lake and is under
stood to have cost the Canadian gov
ernment $125,000, to build, in 1898.
The trail is kept in good repair from
Telegraph creek to Nahlin Station, a
distance of 90 miles, being used every
year by Telegraph creek pack trains
freighting supplies for the Canadian
government telegraph stations. Sup
plies for the telegraph stations be
ween Nahlin and Atlin are also packed
from Telegraph creek to Nakina river,
which is about 60 miles from Atlin and
150 miles from Telegraph creek. Big
game Hunters who outfit at Telegraph
creek go in every year to the Nahlin
country after caribou. Moose and
mountain sheep in the immediate vi
cinity of the new strike. The Tele
graph creek Indians own the native
hunting rights there and many of
them have placer claims staked. It
can thus be seen that the strike is in
a country tributary to Telegraph creek,
from which it is a distance about 115
miles.
"The freight rates from Wrangell
to Telegraph creek are from two to
two and one-half cents per pound. The
Hudson's Bay Company have a river
steamer with a freight capacity of 200
tons running on the Stikine between
Wrangell and Telegraph creek from
about May 20th to September 1st.
There are also several power boats
available carrying passengers and
freight from May 10th to October 15th.
INGCRSOLL HAS
EIGHT-HOUR BILL
Representative Charles E. Inger
: oil. of Ketchikan, has introduced an
eight-hour bill in the House that is
designed to meet the objections that
have been raised to the Gaffney-Ro
den bill. It limits its scope to quartz
mining, and provides for eight hours
of actual work in the mine, requiring
the laborer to go to and return from
work and his meals on his own time.
Col. Ingersoll attempted to get his
bill passed the committee on labor,
apiial and immigration, which has the
Roden-Gaffney labor bill under con
sideration. Representative Thomas
Gaffney is chairman of this committee
and he is committeed to his own bill.
Col. Ingersoll moved, yesterday, to!
have his bill referred to the committee
on mining and manufactures. Mr. Gaff
ney was not In at the time the motion
was made, but others caught the pur- j
port of the motion, and began a mild >
form of filibuster until the arrival of
Mr. Gaffney. The latter succeeded
in getting the bill to his committee.
The committee on labor, capital and
immigration was instructed to report
upon all eight-hour bills that have
been referred to it at the same time.
ALASKAN MAKES
FORTUNE IN ENGLAND
Nat Lyons, formerly an Alaskan
printer and prospector, turned his
Northern exeprience into profit to him
self in an unusual manner. He was
visiting last year at his old home, St.
Ives Bay, Cornwall, England. His con
nection with the stream tin deposits
of Seward peninsula enabled him to
recognize the tin the seasands of his
native land. Assays disclosed that
the sand carried 15 pounds of tin to
the square yard, and ? as the tin is
worth 40 cents a pound it made the
sand worth $6 to the yard.
Lyons organized a company that ac
quired 1,200,000 square yards of the
Cornwall sands, and the $500,000 ne
cessary to hold and develop it was
quickly secured.
Cornwall has been producing tin
for many centuries, but the sands
along this particular shore were never
believed to be v tuable until the prac
ticed eye of the Alaskan discerned its
riches.
Lyons' last residence in Alaska was
at Iditarod, where he was employed
on the Jditarod Pioneer.
FIRST BANKING BILL
BEFORE LEGISLATURE
The first banking bill to make its
appearance in the Legislature has
been introduced by Representative
Milo Kelly, of Knik. It is understood
that Representative W. T. Burns, of
Fairbanks, has a mining bill in course
of preparation, but so far it has not
been given to the public.
Among the salient features of Mr.
Kelly's bill are the following:
It makes the Secretary of the Ter
ritory ox-ofllcio Bank Examiner; re
quires a minimum of $25,000 paid up
capital; not less than five incorpora
tors; every director to be a bona fide
stockholder; no money shall be loaned
to any director or other officer, nor
Bhnll an overdraft be permitted them;
makes it unlawful for any bank to pur-1
chase the capital stock in whole or
part of any other bank, except where
it is made necessary in order to get
security or satisfaction of a debt prev
iously contracted with the bank; each
bank is assessed $100 to bear the ex
pense of maintaining a bank examiner;
all banks must report to the bank ex
aminer at least three timeB a year,
,
SPECIAL THIS WEEK
JUST RECEIVED?A shipment of
fancy apples. $1.25 per box?GOLD
STEIN'S Lf.
j"i I 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1 I M'-H-H H I I 1 M-l
The 'Model'1
:: I1
This Is a f
? ? y
RESTAURANT J
II J
T I
? ? *r
;; Fred Vinton Tom McMullen j;
?gBMII?WIBH H I
Fire-Proof Buildings
Cheap as Wooden Structures
Plans and specifications for
reinforced concrete buildings
and piles, and cement houses,
prepared by
C. K. FORNER, Engineer,
Juneau, Alaska !
Call At""
"HOME BAKERY"
For Home-Made Pies, Cakes and
Bread.
F. F. Graff?Propr.
SECOND ST.?Opp. Customs House
?I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 MT 1 1 I
i; The Unique Millinery
:: Easter Goods
!! Upstairs, Cor. Second and Main
I&K i
Mill
~ / AbsolutelySeif-a,,,
(dined; ready to operate
on arrival;
Coil reasonable; eflieient ami
I durable; easily shipped to
#/ rrmat<> points; needs no
special foundation.
One patron write*: "Wo nro ualng
n 35-meah screen nml milling an
average of Id ton* of ore per 24-hour
(lay with each mill. Considering
hor*e|?iwer C"Iihuii>o<! I.ITTI.K GIANT
STAMP MII.I.S are most rapid erush
er* ever *een: prefer them to any
other atamp mill <>n market."
Information obtainable by address
ing or calling on
Seattle Construction & Drydock Company
Dept.. ^ Seattle, U. S. A. j
1
HEIDELBERG LIQUOR Co
"House of Good Drinks"
BEST APPOINTED PLACE IN TOWN
Dairies nothing but the finest quality of goods. Family
Trade Solicited
Telephone .*586?QUICK DELIVERY
?h-h-h ?! -1 -i i i 1 i 1 i ii i' m i I 1-hH-hhH-H-H-i 1 i i 1 1 i 1 i I'M 11111 h'
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL ANI) ANNEX J
*) Restaurant in Connection EHtablished 1881 European Plan
;; commercial men's home ;;
e front st. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. juneau, alaska *?
| the circle: city hotel j
mrs. M. e. bergmann, Prop. ;;
t HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN "
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED E
'?third street juneau, alaska J
" I
1 I i i 1 i -1 - 1 1 1 !? i I i 1 i
I OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. j
t Thos. H. Asliby, Pres. A. G. Rays, Scc.-Treas. J
It COR. SFAVARI) AND SECOND STREETS \
finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke ?
?
A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN %
| f - Cleaned and Blocked
Ma tS JUNEAU
^ CLEANING AND DYE WORKS
| SECOND STREET, BETWEEN SEWARD AND FRANKLIN STREETS
P* ftiB S. I ^ ?J ^23
I 111 Efl I I j?_
w P^wmMI
?lUgUS
| Better than the Best
WITHOUT our knowledge, the Columbus Labo
ratories of Chicago tested Fisher's Blend
Flour for a Dakota Wheat Grower. The an
alysis ranked Fisher's Blend Flour higher in Gen
eral Average, Gluten Quality, Water Absorption and
Loaf Value than the best Dakota all-Hard Wheat Pat
ent Flour, which is the recognized standard for bread
stuff efficiency. Fisiier's Blend Flour is a scientific
combination of Eastern Hard Wheat and Western Soft
Wheat, preserving the best qualities of each. It costs
you from 20 to 2.">r/e less than a straight Eastern Hard
Wheat Flour?does
Fisher's Blend Flour
For Sale by All Dealers
Fj
BENEFIT BALL AND
ENTERTAINMENT
For the Benefit of the
All Alaska Sweep Stakes
ELKS HALL
FRIDAY NIGHT, MAR. 28
Admission, $2.50, Ladies Free

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