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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 07, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postotllco at Ju- i
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.0U
QUALIFICATIONS OF SENATOR TANNER
THE technical point urged by those of Skagway that would
prevent Senator J. M. Tanner from acting as a member of
the City Council at that place seems far-fetched. They are up
on an ordinance that requires a member of the City Council to
be a registered voter, and. because of the fact that his duties'
as a member of the Territorial Senate prevented. Senator Tan
ner did not get to Skagway so as to register for the municipal
election that took place last Tuesday. It is urged that this dis
qualifies him to serve, notwithstanding that he was re-elected
to the Council by a vote of almost two to one. No one questions
but that Mr. Tanner is a citizen of Skagway, and he has regis
terer several times since the passage of the ordinance.
After a vexatious experience with the floods that held him
up at Pittsburgh for several days, Chairman Hugh C. Todd, of
the Democratic State Central Committee, has returned to Seattle
filled with characteristic optimism. He says the President will
appoint those Democrats the organization has recommended to
office in the State of Washington.
THE APPOINTMENT OF WALLACE
THE appointment of Hugh C. Wallace to be ambassador to
France does not improve the American service in the way
the average man would like to have it improved. Wallace's
chief claim to fame rests upon his great wealth and the fact that
the late Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller was.his father-in-law.
He always has been closely associated with the monied inter
ests. He supported Palmer and Buckner in 1896 and he has al
ways opposed Bryan with his influence and money. He did all
within his power to defeat the nomination of Wilson last year,
and solely because Wilson was the candidate of the progressive
Democrats. However, he gave the ticket loyal support after the
Baltimore convention, and the association with progressive Dem
ocrats since that time might have worked a change in his atti
tude toward things political that has not been noticed out in the
West. Anyhow, there is satisfaction in the knowledge that his
boss while in office will be Bryan.
All protectionists, whether Louisiana Democrats or Penn
sylvania Republicans, look alike to President Wilson. He has
decreed that the sugar growers cannot write a tariff schedule
that will be unfair to the sugar users.
THEORY OF THE MEXICAN REBELLION
THE northern stales of Mexico?Sonora, Sinaloa, Coahuila and
Chihuahua?with Gov. Carranza, of Sonora, at their head
are in "constitutional revolt," according to the declaration
which they have sent forth. They have separated themselves
from the remainder of Mexico, and the state machinery is be
ing used by the revolutionists. In fact, the customs houses are
pretty generally in their hands, and the public revenues are be
ing used to maintain armies in the field that control most of the
tetrritorial area within their boundaries. They acted in most
part through their legislative bodies and state officers. There
fore. there is a rebellion in progress that is of a geographical
character such as that which prevailed during the American
Civil War.
The "constitutionalists," so-called, have announced that they
will not attempt to invade other sections of Mexico, but that they
will resist any attempt at coercion of their states on the part of
Huerta. However, the announcement says that their action does
not contemplate the permanent independence of their states,
"except so long as it might be necessary to guarantee national
constitutionalism."
It all sounds peculiar to an American, but is probably good
logic in Mexico. The situation seems to be that the people of
Northern Mexico are still believers in the tenets of Madero.
They believe that his removal was accomplished in violation of
the constitution, and that it is not the purpose of Huerta to pay
attention to the constitution that, theoretically at least, makes
the power of the citizens supreme in that country. They look
upon the dead Madero as a statesman that was doing his best
to establish the reign of the people. They know that the consti
tution was a dead letter during the rule of Diaz and that the ad
herents and supporters of Diaz are the men that are now closest
to Huerta. They feel that to continue Huerta in control would
be to return to a personal government, such as that given Mex
ico by Diaz, or at best, it would mean an oligarchy where a small
group of men would exercise all authority without reference to
or regard for the people. They believe that it would be a gov
ernment where death by execution or assassination would be
the penalty for criticism. If that is what Southern Mexico would
prefer, then the Northerners are for separation until those of
the South change their minds.
SHORT PARAGRAPHS
CONCERNING ALASKA
(From "Alaska, an Empire in the
Making, by J. J. Underwood." Pub
lished by permission of Dodd. Mead
& Company.)
One mine in Alaska has produced
four times as much gold as the
United States paid for the entire
territory. This mine, the Treadwell.
operates the second largest stamp
mill in the world. Boers property on
the Witswaterstrand, South Africa, is
its only competitor.
Alaska contains approximately
twenty-one million acres of coal
lands. Of this amount thirty-two
thousand acres were staked by the
men who discovered these lands. Ac
cording to the estimates of competent
engineers and geologists, the coal in
Alaska is sufficient to sustain the
people of the United States for 5,300!
years at the present rate of consump
tion.
During the past ten years, the com
merce of Alaska with the United
States?in and out?has amounted
to more than $500,000,000, several
millions more than the trade of the
United States with the Orient.
The mineral production of Alaska
from 1883 to 1910 amounted to $206,
000,000, more than $195,000,000 of this
amount being in gold. The averdu
pois weight of gold taken out of Al
aska?rougly figured?is a little more
than four hundred tons. This does
not include several million dollars in
gold brought to the United States
by the Americans from the Klondike
region.
Since the occupation by the citi
zens of the United States, Alaska has
yielded in fishery products?walrus,
ivory, aquatic furs, whalebone and
fish?to the value of $210,000,000.
The food fishes at the close of the
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t I I I I1
Forced Out of Business I
By owner of Building. Had no lease. Must
Move in Thirty days and have no house to J j
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;;
ware,Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;!
wrI I CHARICK il l
& Hand I | X JEWELER
Painted China And OPTICIAN
I I I I I I It I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ? I I I I I I I I I I I I
fiscal year 1910 had netted $129,301,
482 and the fur seals $50,366,767.
Alaska is more than twice the size
of the German Empire, nearly thir
teen times the size of New York
state, larger than all of the states
north of the Ohio and Potomac riv
?rs and east of the Mississippi, and
is something more than one-fifth the
size of the United States proper. It
would make nearly five hundred
states as large as Rhode Island.
Estimates made by the United j
States Department of Agriculture, In
experiments extending over eleven
years, placed the area of arable and
grazable land at sixty-four millionj
acres. This department estimates
that the territory is susceptible of
sustaining a population of from three
to five million persons by agriculture
pursuits alone.
PIONEER PROSPECTOR
LIKES SILVER CREEK
Walter Dikeman, who went to the
Silver Creek country near Lake Tes
lin about six weeks ago, according
to a letter received from Atlin, has
returned to the latter place for sup
plies. and incidentally, with an en
couraging report of the country.
Dikeman is reported as saying that,
while he had not done much pros
pecting during the short time he was
on Silver Creek, owing to the deep
snow, yet the appearance of the coun
try and nature of the formation were
such as to lead him to conclude that
gold exists there and it was for the
purpose of securing suplies on which
to conduct extensive prospect work
that Dikeman returned to Atlin.
Walter Dikeman is tne man wno
discovered gold in the Iditarod coun
try. later selling his holdings there
for a .uarter of a million dollars. He
is an < xperienced prospector and has
the m ans for carrying on operations
on large scale. He has several
men in his employ with him in the
territory of the reported new strike
and if there is anything more to be
discovered there, Dikeman is the
stamp of man who will be Instrument
al In locating it.?Whitehorse Star.
SAVING GRACE OF
TOM MARSHALL
I am setting no little store by
Thomas R. Marshall, the Vice-Presi
dent.
He grows upon the capital and up
on the country in a personality that
is set to especial usefulness and time
liness for this era.
Vice-President Marshall is the sav
ing grace of a strenuous administra
tion. He is the only thing that
"rests" the country. He is one of the
few men I ever met high up in Ameri
can politics who doesn't take himself
too seriously. He is neither burdened
with his mission nor oppressed by his
tremendous responsibility.
Following a long and ponderous list
of superfluous excellencies in the sen
ate chair here is a real human being
so natural, so easy, so quaintly, soft
ly humorous, and so homespun kind,
that he is already kin to the senate
and half the capitol.
Tom Marshall, of Indiana, thought
he "sank into a four years' silence"
when he said his salutory on the
fourth of March. But he was mistak
en. He has just begun to talk. The
Lord be praised for his sense of hu
mor.
The senate is going to be better
and happier for that man. He will
get under Wilson's jacket too, and
Bryan's and even the tense, stern
Burleson and the rest of them, and
make them glad when the Mexics are
fretful and officeseekers rage.
The Vice-President's humor is not
so hard and sharp a thing as wit. It
is the real thing. It gets under the
cockles of the heart and never stings.
It does not make a noise, but it relax
es and it warms.
He wraps it oftenest about himself
and all about his station. The Vice
Presidency is a soft human joke to
Tom Marshall. It really tickles him
to death, with a kind of shame-faced
merriment at having nothing to do.
He is a good presiding officer al
ready and will be fine. But it does
not worry him. He was a "corking"
good governor out in Indiana and did
big things strongly and can do them
again.
But the humor of the Vice-Presiden
tial chair has got into his bones and
he'll never get it out. It is the most
humorous place in all the civilized
world, and I am so glad Tom Marshall
found it.
There is one office in Washington
around which there isn't going to be
any friction for the next four years.
And mark me, when the time of
tension comes anywhere else in this
administration, there is a reserve
power of force, and kindness and
tact, and the saving grace of humor
in this Imliunu second fiddle that will
do as much as the mightiest to unite
the chords and reestablish the har
monies.
The country is just beginning to
know its vice-president. It has a
pleasure in store.? John Temple
Graves.
CHICAGO POLICE MAKE
A PECULIAR ARREST
CHICAGO, April 7.?A woman giv
ing her name as Mrs. Jack Lewis
caused the arrest of a man here yes
terday whom she claims to have
married at Portland, Ore., six months
ago. The arrested man refused to
give his name, but says lie never was
in Portland and never saw the woman
that caused his arrest before.
The new Spring and Summer styles
are now ready. You are cordially in
' vited to call and inspect them.?
P. WOLLAND. lw.
NOTICE
i United States Commissioner's Court
for the District of Alaska, Divis
ion No. One, Juneau Precinct,
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of FRED
BROMAN, Deceased.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the I
undersigned has been, by the United ;
States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Fred
Broman, deceased. All persons having
claims against said estate are here
by notified to present them, with the
proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence on the Beach Road at
Douglas, Alaska.
Dated this first day of March, 1913.
Ij. a. slane,
Administrator.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarmy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
j upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
I of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
i of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
I after the first publication of this no
! tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
i said claims will, in accordance with
; law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
1 by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
I terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
jand the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Stun Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postoffice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Junenu
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
?j
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST j;
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - ? - Alaska ; |
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT l
127 Walker Building, Seattle ]
205 Seward St. JUNEAU |
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland ;
CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS ;
Estimates Furnished Free Upon |
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
'PHONE?209
PSYCHIC READER HERE
Madam Chcironu, palmist and |
phychic reader, of London, Eng
land, has located temporarily in |
the Johnson Cottage, Second
and Main St. Readings strict- I
ly confidential.
* * ;
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17. 23. 29. Jan. 4, 10.
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March o, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17.
Dec. 11. Jan. 4, 28. Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21. March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,"
Eagle River, Yankee Cove. Sen
tinel Light Station, .Tualln, El
drcd Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21. 27. Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9. 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the j J
following day at 8:00 a. tn.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. |
The Aln.skn Flyer S. HUMBOLDT The A Lanka Flyer
NORTHBOUND APRIL 10
SOUTHBOUND APRIL 11
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
-H-H-H-H-H"11 !? I 1 I I I I I I I I 1 I M H"I"H 1111111111111111 II
i\@\ ALASKA !
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service. Spe?(l Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma. Victoriu and Vancouver. Through ""
tickets to San Francisco "
JEFFERSON Northbound ....APR. 7 Southbound.... APR. 8
;; NORTHWESTERN Northb'd. . APR. 12 Southbound APR. 19
S. S. MARIPOSA Southbound APR. 9
? ? ALAMEDA Northbound APR. ,22 Southbound.... APR. 29 ??
?r
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. J.
?M-H-M-M I I I I I 1 I I 1 I !? I 1 1 1 1111111 I l-I-I
r> i/O 8_B0 A Airv Allcn Shattuck> A9ent< 0ffice ?
I nllli g Iil/tINLJ with Juneau Transfer Co- ?
r>, I ? /> John Henson, Douglas Agent T
I Steamship Company |
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU ?
t Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, . April 14 :
I 17 i. G 1.1.1 First c,ass $19.00 t
? rare to oeattie second ciass $12.00 |
?++ 4-f-K n II >-i t M i n i; 11111111111111111111111111
:! ALASKA COAST CO. ii
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
I Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU I I
II S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON MARCH 30 ||
| | S. S. YUKON APRIL 24 | |
|| SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ||
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON APRIL 7
; ; S. S. YUKON APRIL 6 I !
ight is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. , .
|| S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ? |
* M i m 11111 ii 111 ii 1111111111111111111 H i mi 111 > i' 11
t PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ?
skattije, tacoma, i:
X Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Oiympia, Port Townsend, o
X South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco,
? Anacortcs, Los Angeles and San Diego. ?
t C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
X 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle
J S. S. SPOKANE North APril 1022 8outh APr- 11*23 o
% CITY OF SEATTLE North APril 16-28?South April 5-17-29 ?
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ^
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C. Coast Service
Sailing from Juneau for I'ort Simpson. Prince Rupert. Swnnson. Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria und Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK MARCH 22
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J.T. SPICKETT. A*t.
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Tread well
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. ir..
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p.m.
' 9:00 p.m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trend
well for
Juneau
*S: 25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
S:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
iA'aVOF
DoukIiih for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m. I
0:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. tt
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
6:10 p. ra.
From Juneau lor
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nwht Only
I 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. in.
Leaves Treadwell
11:46 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
; Sii'ulav S. h.-liil.' -Mill' a.M uImvi'. . x<-.-pt trip U?avitUjInnea?JitjjJ?J^
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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