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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 14, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
IJntered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the poatofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, und'er the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 6.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
PROSPERITY DEPENDS UPON KEEPING PROMISE.
THOSE that remain of the people who fear that disaster will
follow the passage of a low tariff bill are troubling them
selves over superficial things. A thoughful man should see
that there would be far more danger to the country in a failure of
the Democrats to carry out a clearly made and vigorously prom
ised platform program than could possibly follow the faithful ex
ecution of party promises. The Republican party has just been
retired from office because it failed to execute its platform prom
ises according to the people's understanding of them. Now, if the
Democratic party should become discredited in like manner, what
would come next? Where would the people turn? When would
discontent and uncertainty end?
The confidence of the people in the institutions of their coun
try would be sadly shaken if the Democrats, coming into power as
they have, with a mandate from the people so plain that its mean
ing cannot be mistaken, should fail to do what they have promised
to do and what they have been directed to do. The only way pos
sible to restore confidence is to convince the people that public
officials are going to perform as they have promised. The soon
er the party in power can get the pledges of its platform into oper
ation the better it will be for the business of the country.
The fact that there has been a stiffening of the "market" since
the assurance has gone out that the Underwood bill will be a
promise-keeping measure, and that it will pass, and since the New
York legislature passed the bills regulating the New York stock
exchange, is. itself, indicative of the soundness of this reasoning.
How thankful "Jethro Bass, of Conniston" must feel that
Winston Churchill got him comfortably out of politics before he
invited President Wilson to make his summer home in the Hamp
shire hills!
TAFT'S INSPIRING EXAMPLE.
THe example presented to the American people by former Presi
dent Taft in surrendering the reins of authority as the Na
tion's chief executive and taking up his new work in the
class room of a university is inspiring. It stimulates confidence
in the civilization that we have developed on this North American
continent. It typifies the disposition of our people to abide by the
verdict of the majority, and to act the part of useful citizens
wherever they find work to be done. The example gains force,
rather than loses it, from the fact that it is by no means novel.
It is the rule rather than the exception for an American, upon re
tiring from high office at an age when his working days are not)
yet over, to drop into some congenial employment that is helpful
to the public rather than to plan and plot against those who tri
umphed over them.
Other great Americans, whose political ambitions have been
unfulfilled because a majority of their fellow citizens disagreed
with their ideas of what should be done, like Mr. Taft, have quit
public service to become schoolmasters. The great Gen. Robert
E. Lee. loved by a section of the Nation as no other man,?save,
perhaps. Washington?was ever loved by it, surrendered his de
feated but heroic army to Grant, and become president of a uni
versity where he was enabled to leave the impress of a majestic
character upon hundreds of young men that became better citi
zens because of it: and William L. Wilson, whom President Cleve
land said that he would like to make assistant President after a
protectionist constituency had retired him from Congress, devot
ed his latter years to educational work as he had devoted his ear
lier.
But. as said, these and other examples too numerous to men
tion. but accentuate the value of all of Mr. Taft's action. The
wholesome manner in which he has returned to the duties of an
every-day citizen of the Republic is a token of the sincerity that
was in his heart when he, with beaming and enthusiastic counte
nance, congratulated his successor at his inauguration and told
him that he hoped that his administration would be a success, andj
assured him that "we will all be behind you."
?
The Allies seem determined to go on into Constantinople
while going is good.
The city is to be congratulated by the manner in which the
new City Council is taking up the matter of fire protection for the
city. The suggestions made by Councilman Hurlbutt at Friday's
meeting are worthy of the highest praise. They are in line with
the necessities of the situation, and should be adopted at the earl
iest possible moment.
AN EASTERN TRIBUTE
TO WILLIAM J. BRYAN
"Stand-pattisra is dead." said Mr.
Bryan in his speech at I)es Moines.
In stating the lesser fact Mr. Bryan
omits the greater fact. Not only is
stand-pattism dead but Hannaism is
dead.
It was Mark Hanna Republican
ism that put the United States gov
ernment into partnership with Big
Business. It was Mr. Bryan's free
silver campaign of 1896 that gave
Hanna and Plutocracy their oppor
tunity. In trying to escape the evils
of a debased currency the country
swung to the other extreme.
As a result of the 1896 campaign
Washington moved to Wall Street,
and Wall Street became the capital of
the United States. The government
was frankly and cynically adminis
tered for the profit of privilege. Plu
tocracy became as arrogant and des
potic as slavery. If Wall Street want
ed legislation, legislation was enact
ed. If Wall Street wanted laws sus
pended. those laws were suspended.
If certain government policies meant
dividends for Big Business, those pol
icies were adopted. If Wall Street
wanted to exploit the resources of
the country, those resources were
placed at his disposal.
The very expression, "stand-pat"
was coined by Mark Hanna to en
courage the Republican machine to re
sist the public demand for honest
tariff revision, and it soon became a
battle-cry against every assault up
on public abuses and public wrongs.
From the Dingley Act to Dollar Di
plomacy. every evil that helped to
bring about the final wreck of the
I Republican party had its origin in the
unholy alliance that Hanna establish
ed between the government and Wall
Street.
Mr. Bryan can take pardonable
pride in the death of stand-pattism.
He has lived to retrieve the mistakes
of his past. His free-silver campaign
drove the country to plutocracy, but
his battle for Progressive Democracy
In 1912 emancipated It. To his ef
forts the country owes the nomination
, of Mr. Wilson for president and the
effective realization of the new poli
cies that have taken the United States
government out of the hands of Wall
111111111IIIIIII111
t
jj Have Only
:: Ten Days
Greater
Reductions
Than Ever.
< 111111111111111111
I I I I I I I I I HI I i I I I I I I I I II I I M II I t t I I
Forced Out of Business ill
By owner of Building. Had no lease. Must
Move in Thirty days and have no house to jj
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;
ware, Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;
Deep Cut. | | QHARICK jj
White & Hand I I J JEWELER
Painted China * ^ and OPTICIAN i !
I I I I I II I I I I I I'l I I I I I I I ? I I I I I I I I I I I ?
Street. Without William ? J. Bryan
we would have no Woodrow Wilson.
Mr. Bryan's cast is unique. There
is no other instance in American his
tory In which a statesman atoned so
brilliantly and so heneftciently for his
blunders.?New York World.
EVEN WILSON FALLS
FOR BASEBALL GAME
President Wilson's acceptance of a
season's pass from the Washington
baseball club goes to show that if
people keep on trying they will find
the weak spot that indicates that a
man is human no matter how much of
a front he puts up in the effort to
conceal it.?Pittsburgh Gazzete-Times.
LEWIS CAUSES SUN TO
BREAK INTO POETRY
If e'er I damned, I bless "these '
eyes that watch the Pink Aurora rise
incarnadining happy sk;es, Jim Ham
Lewis! O, fluttering, brilliant, flash
ing thing, bright butterfly of gorgeous j
wing, Kast, South and West far jour-|
neying. Jim Ham Lewis! A para-'
gon of manly grace, a myosotis of a
face, in Beauty's Jack king, jack
and ace, Jim Ham Lewis! I see the
Senate lights turn pale, 1 see Mar
tine, of Plainfield quail; thou makest
the "plain people" all Jim Ham Lew
is. Voice sweeter than the peter
bird, emitter of as matchless word
as e'er the throat of Bryan stirred,
Jim Ham Lewis! Born wast thou in
states forty-eight (not counting ter
ritories) : elate, each wreathes thy
| brow deliberate, Jim Ham Lewis!
Gray Washington awaits thy flames
Potomac hankers for her James, (
Cook county's joy. the flower of i
names. Jim Ham Lewis!
The Senate longs, swift, swift bei
sped to us thou pink unequaled; lo.,
to the pink louts low the red. Jim i
' I
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
Whereas, on the 2nd day of April,
1012, an order of sale was issued out
of the District Court for Alaska. Di
vision No. 1, at Juneau, in the case
of British Columbia Development As
sociation, and Sir John George Craggs,
as Receiver of the assets of said asso
ciation, vs. The North Pacific Wharves
& Trading Company, and to me direct
ed and delivered as Referee appointed
in said cause, commanding me to sell
as under execution all the right title
and interest which the said defendant i
had. on the 9th day of August, 1907,
or at any time thereafter, in and to
the following described property to-1
wit:
That certain wharf property, and
other properties, situated, lying and |
being at, and immediately southeast1
of the town of Skagway, Alaska,.
known and held as and called "Moore's
Wharf Property," together with the
wharf approaches to the same, and to
gether with the land beginning at the
north end of said approach to said
wharf and running and extending!
south from and along the said Moore's
Wharf (along the blufT on the east;
shore of Skagway Bay), to the wharf!
now constructed, claimed and owned J
by the Pacific & Arctic Railway &
Navigation Company the southernmost
terminus of the said wharf property
having originally been marked and
fixed by the southernmost ringbolt
placed on a point or rock on said
shore by William Moore, and together
with all property rights and franchis
es, privileges, warehouses and other
buildings and improvements, approach
es to said wharf, extensions, and all
other property of any other kind or
nature whatsoever being in or about
said Moore's Wharf at the time of
the making of said mortgage, and also
together with ail and singular the fix
tures, improvements, rights, privileges,
tenements, hereditaments, and appur
tenances, thereunto belonging or In
any wise appurtaining, and the rever
sion or reversions, remainder or re
mainders, rents issues and profits
thereof.
And also commanding me to sell as
under execution, all the right, title and
Interest which the said defendant had,
on the 24th day of December, 1907, or
at any time thereafter, in and to the
following described property, towit:
Situated at or near Skagway, Alas
ka. and being all the right, title, and
interest of the defendant, the North
Pacific Wharves & Trading Company
in the lands, hereditaments, and prom
ises hereinafter specifically described,
together with all and singular the I
buildings. Improvements. fixtures,
rights of way and approach, and
all other rights, privileges, franchises,
easements, and appurtenances, to the
same belonging or In any wise appur
taining. or held and enioyed in con
nection therewith, or with any part
thereof, towit: The Sylvester Wharf,
and the tho Fourth or Seattle Wharf,
both situated on the shore and fore
shore of Skagway Bay. Alaska; and
also all the freehold tract, lot, or par
cel of land lying and being in the town
of Skagway. and bounded as follows:
on the east by the White Pass & Yu
kon Railway's right of way, on the
west by the east line of Spring street,
on the south by the meander line of
Skagway Bay.
Now therefore. Notice is hereby giv
en that I will, on Thursay, the 8th day
of May, 1913. at the Court House door
in Juneau. Alaska, between the hours
of nine o'clock in the morning and
four o'clock In the afternoon, offer the
nbovc described property for sale at
public outcry, to the highest bidder
for cash, the said offer being, of each
of said properties as an entirety.
J. M. DAVIS, Referee.
Ham Lewis! From Victor Murdock's
"Chants of a Scarlet Kawblrd."?
New York Sun.
WALLACE DENIES HE
IS TO GET AN OFFICE
A Washington dispatch in the Se
attle papers denies that Hugh Wallace
will be ambassador to France. It
Quotes Wallace as saying that the
appointment has not been offered to
him and that ho is not an aspirant
for a place at all. The dispatch fol
lows:
"After an absence of a week In
New York, Hugh C. Wallace, of Ta
coma, returned to his home in this
city last night to find several scores
of telegrams awaiting him to con
gratulate him on his remored ap
pointment as ambassador to France.
.Mr. Wallace said this evening that
there was no truth in the rumor, and
that he had no desire for appoint
ment to office."
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Teach, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarmy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
Interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is *25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six mileB from the
Postofflce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAJ
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
.
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau ? ? - Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Building, Seattle
205 Seward St. JUNEAU
=Z====ZZ=I
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
Contractors-Builders
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
?PHONE?209
* *
PSYCHIC READER HERE
Madam Chelrona, palmist and i
phychic reader, of London, Eng- ;
land, has located temporarily In i
the Johnson Cottage, Second
and Main St Readings strict- I
ly confidential.
* ? ? ?
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29. Jan. 4, 10, |
1G, 22, 28. Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21. 27.
March o, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17.
Dec. 11. Jan. 4, 28. Feb. 21.
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
-Nov. 3. 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3.
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2. 8. 14, 20,
26. Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3. 9. 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
I
The Altika Flyer S. HUMBOLDT I The Alajtka Flyer
NORTHBOUND APRIL 21
SOUTHBOUND APRIL 22
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOHD, Agent
?M-H-H I I I 1 I I 1 \ i 1 I !? H I I II I M I II I I I I 1 I I I 1 M I I ! 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I I
ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY I
?J* Safety, Service, K|?wl T Ic k eta to Seattle, Tiiooma. Victoria and Vancouver. Throujfh y
ticket* to San FranciHco T
X JEFFERSON Northbound ....APR. 7 Southbound.... APR. 8 |
T NORTHWESTERN Northb'd.. APR. 12 Southbound.... APR. 19 ^
S. S. MARIPOSA Southbound APR. 9
3. ALAMEDA Northbound APR. 22 Southbound.... APR. 29 ?{?
T T
J Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. ...
n?i?i?r*n?4 ( !-,??? ?
? ^ 1 A f\TI 11 A A I r\ A,len Shattuck- Agent, Office ?
t INUimI rlLAINL/ w,thjuneauTran,fepc?
? <>
r>t * ? /- John Henson, Douglas Agent JJ
? Steamship Company <>
0 REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU o
1 . ?
? Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, April 14, 26 i
? 17 j. C 1.1.I First Class $19.00
x rare to Seattle second ciass $12.00 ;;
/a 4 ?
?H-? I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
ji ALASKA COAST CO. jj
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ..
!! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON ' APRIL 18 l!
;; S. S. YUKON APRIL 24 ;;
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ;;
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON APRIL 26 ? j
;; S. S. YUKON MAY 4
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. , ,
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ??
4 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 IiI I I I 13 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I " I I I I I I I I?I'
| PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. \\
SEATTLE, TACOMA,
+ Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympla, Port Townsend,
J South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, o
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. 0
1 C. D.'DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ^
T 112 Market StreeL San Francisco. 113 James 8treet, Seattle <?
? S. S. SPOKANE North APril 10*22?8outh APr- 11-23 <?
t CITY OF SEATTLE North APril 16-28?South April 5-17-29 o
O Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. <>
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpiion. Prince Rupert, Swanxon, Alert Buy. Vancouver
V ictoria and Seattle
PRINCESS SOPHIA P. C. DOCK APRIL 12
Front and Sewnrd St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKLTT, Attt. J
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
IjUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
I tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
L.V. Juneau for
Douglas and
Treadwell
?8:00 a. nV.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. in.
3:00 p in.
4:30 p. m.
G: 30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
wcll for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. rn.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
leaves
Dougrltu* for ?
Juneau
?8730 a. m. I
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. E
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m._
Leaven Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. ra.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
6:10 P-JO
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night Only
I 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:46 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:60 p. m.
^^Sundu^chedulejcimtMi^bove^cxcopULrli^
5We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
jiBOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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