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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 17, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postottlce at Ju
neau, Alaska, uuder the Act of March 3, 1879.
2
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per mouth, delivered l.OO
ALASKA'S CAl'SE AGAINST PINCHOTISM
THE cause of the people of Alaska against Pinchotism is
strongly put in the Shoup memorial that was introduced in
the House of Representatives Tuesday. The resources of
Alaska will serve men only when they are used. They are use
less when locked up in a wilderness, and their lack of use is the
cause of uncountable waste. Every day that every man loses
because he is deprived of an opportunity to work or to better his
condition in any way by the idleness of Alaska's resources is a
day wasted. The welfare of all men demands that every man
should have opportunity for employment, and that time should
not be wasted. The demand of the hour in Alaska is that the
resources of the country shall be set at work for the inhabitants
of the country and those who are ready and willing to become
inhabitants. Any policy that prevents this is inimical to the
public welfare. President Wilson has truly said that "reserva
tion is not conservation." The highest kind of conservation is
that which conserves time and opportunity for men and women.
Let us have some of it in Alaska.
Senator Wesley L. Jones, of Washington, is out progressing
the Progressives, though he has steadfastly refused to leave the
Republican party. He has just introduced a bill in the United
States Senate that would levy an inheritance tax for the bene
fit of the Nation that would range all the way from one per cent,
of modest estates to half of the swollen fortunes of the great
multimillionaires. By the way, Senator Jones will come before
the people shortly for re-election to the United States Senate.
LOW FREIGHTS AND RATE WARS
LOW freight rates are always desirable. They reduce the cost
of living and production. Consequently they increase
demand, and thus stimulate trade at both ends of the line.
The fight the people of Yukon Territory are making for lower
rates from the White Pass & Yukon is a natural contest for peo
ple. that are interested in making the most out of their country,
to make. And. it is not unlikely that the White Pass could af
ford to carry passengers and freight at lower rates than it is
carrying them and still make a profit on its business. We do
not know. If so, the rates should be reduced. However, there
is one thing that those who are interested in having as many of
the passengers and as much of the tonnage, that is enroute to
the Interior, as possible to go via the "Inside Passage" and down
the Yukon River, instead via the ocean and up the river, can
not afford to forget: The White Pass & Yukon Route is their
only hope. It is very much to be desired that the line of steam
ers that company proposes to operate on the Lower Yukon this
summer will do well. Therefore, it might not be for the best in
the long run to encourage a disastrous rate war. Rate wars are
not permanent and do not result in a stable growth of trade.
They are like artificial stimulants. They are demoralizing, and
the after-effect is bad. Get the rates as low as are comensurate
with good business, but do not get Northern transportation
intoxicated. Wholsesome competition is a good thing, and de
serves encouragement, but a ruinous rate war in the long run
hurts others as well as those that lose money in the traffic.
Wh:- : do those Massachusetts men mean by electing anoth
er Democratic Congressman? Do they desire to handicap the
party with a majority that already is cumbersome, or have they
contracted the habit?
LUCK IN A TACOMA RESIDENCE
IN THIS day and time when the thoughts of so many are turned
toward office-getting, when men are wont to be careful about
the shoulder over which they catch the first glimpse of a
new moon, and spend a great deal of time sedulously searching
memories for lucky talismen, it might be interesting to consider
Tacoma. Nothing has seemed to lead to success in securing high
office like a residence in the City of Destiny. President Wilson's
Secretary of the Interior once resided in Tacoma, where he was
editor of a nwspaper and where he met and married his wife.
Hugh C. Wallace who was said to be slated for the ambassador
ship to France claims Tacoma as his residence, though he has
lived most of the time for a decade at Washington, and, it is
averred, has not voted in Tacoma for eight years. Maurice A.
Langhorne, said to be slated for appointment as United States
District Attorney for Western Washington, is a Tacoma lawyer.
Gov. Ernest Lister, of the State of Washington, is a citizen
of Tacoma, and Frank M. Lamborn, recently appointed by him to
the best paying office in the State administration, is a member
of a Tacoma printing firm. Henry Drum, of Seattle, recently ap
pointed warden of the Washington State penitentiary, was form
erly a Tacoma banker and a resident of that city when he was ac
tive in politics.
Not only has fate been kind to these former Tacoma men
since the Democrats came into power, but residence in that city
has been lucky for Republicans and others who have sought office
of recent years. Alaska's Delegate to Congress was a Tacoman
for many years. Judge Cushman, who served on the bench in
Alaska for a while and quit it oniy to take a life job as United
States District Judge for Western Washington, resides in Taco
ma. Supreme Court Justices Parker and Ellis, Lieut.-Gov. Hart.,
Secretary of State Howell, and State Treasurer Meath, of Wash
ington, are all voters in Tacoma.
And, considered Dy una large, cnese lacoma men are capaDie
and clean officials and are rendering the people good service.
It might be added, as a matter of local interest, that Major
J. F. A. Strong, who has been generally endorsed by the people
of Alaska for Governor of this Territory, was resident of Ta
coma for several years where he was editor of the Tacoma
Ledger.
No man that ever saw Greaser-Mexican soldiers will with
hold his sympathy from those army men that think they have
111111111111111111
:: Have Only
:: Ten Days
Greater
!! Reductions
I;; Than Ever.
111111111111111111111 n 111 itt lie hh
Forced Out of Business |
By owner of Building. Had no lease. Must
Move in Thirty dayi; and have no house to 't \
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;;
ware,Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;
Deep CuU in I I QHARICK jj
White & Hand I J J JEWELER
Painted China " ^ and OPTICIAN
n i n 111111111111111111 ? 1111111111 it 1
kept open house down in Arizona for their entertainment about
long enough.
The arrest of a man at Chicago yesterday charged with par
ticipating in the New Westminster bank robbery reminds us that
those Canadians are some chasers when they get after a man
that has committed crime in their country. They sure would
make good Indians.
How those upon whom the weatherman has been perpetrat
ing his pranks for, lo, these many years, envy President Wilson
that one swift kick he got in with the Presidential boot before
Willis Moore could make his getaway!
WHITEHORSE PROPERTY
TO BE WORKED
Reports are reaching town that the
Grafter mine on which development
work has been carried on since lust
fall, is looking better now than at
any time since the Atlas Mining com
pany has been operating there. It
is said that large ore bodies are be
ing revealed and that the ore is of
much higher grade than that being
mined at the Pueblo. Diamond drills
will be put to work on the Grafter
soon in order that the extent of the
ore bodies may be determined. It 1b
said the Atlas Mining company will
j not further develop the Valerie, but
| will permit its option to lapse.?
' Whitehorse Star.
WOMAN WIRELESS OPER
ATOR HAS CLOSE CALL
KETCHIKAN, Alaska. April 8.?
The steamer Windbar, Captain H. E.
Soule, arrived here this afternoon from
King cove and Excursion Inlet, where
the vessel unloaded cannery supplies.
On the return trip the vessel en
countered a severe storm and during
the heavy laboring of the vessel a dy
namo in the wireless room was torn
loose, pounding heavily from side to
side, smashing the wireless instru
ments and all the furniture in the
room. Mrs. H. E. Soule, wife of the
captain, who is the wireless operator,
left the room but a moment before,
thus escaping probable serious injury.
The vessel was brought up into the
wind and the dynamo made fast.
The Windbar is en route to Belling
ham for another load of cannery sup
! plies.
CARRIER PIGEONS
AS FISHER FOLK
Probably the greatest innovation in
the fishing trade yet heard of on the
Pacific coast is to be adopted by J. j
Sidney Smith, of the Atlin Fisheries, |
Limited, whose headquarters are in
Prince Rupert, says the Prince Ru
pert Empire.
In order that he may keep in con-i
stant touch with his trawlers engaged
in the Hecate straits and north and
west of Queen Charlotte Islands, Mr.'
Smith has placed an order for a large
; number of carrier pigeons, whose
home coop will be in this city. Each
I boat going out to the fish banks will
take ten or a dozen birds on board
to be liberated whenever it is desired
to send a message to the head office
of the company.
As the boats are seldom more than
a hundred miles from here, messages
can be delivered within less than two
hours, the average speed of a carrier
pigeon being from sixty to seventy
miles an hour. Mr. Smith's unique
scheme will be watched with a great
deal of interest. If a success, no
doubt other Companies engaged in the
fishing business here and along thej
coast may follow the example.
ANOTHER GOOD WORD
FOR SECRETARY LANE
There is no doubt but that Alasku
will get all there is coming to her
from Hon. Franklin K. Lane, Secre
tary of the Interior in President Wil
son's cabinet. By the last mail the
editor of the Star, who was very well
acquainted with Mr. Lane when he
was editor of a paper in Tacoma,
Wash., twenty years ago, received
from him a personal letter, which
closed with these words: "I hope I
may be of service to Alaska in the
next four years." We know Mr. Lane
sufficiently well to assure the people
of Alaska that he means just what
he says.?Whitehorse Star.
THEY NEED EDUCATION.
The courts abroad cannot recon
cile themselves to the idea that the
function of an American diplomat is
to instruct rather than to entertain.
?Washington Star.
Oyster-lovers, go to "U and I"
Lunch Room. 4-14-lm.
'
"UNCLE JOE" THE LAST CANON.
Congress says the supply of old
cannons for patriots is exhausted;
yes, the last one was sent to Dan
ville on March 4.?Washington Post.
SEE VAN LEHN
For Cabinet Making or Carpenter
work. 4-15-6-t.
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Vakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch. deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Cornniiciioner. Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch. deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarmy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 18S0, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims:
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group: and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofflce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau *
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST I
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - ? Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY |j
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW !
Mining and Corporation Law J
Offices: Juneau, Alaska j
Seattle, Wash. :'
? <
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
?127 Walker Huilding, Seattle
205 Seward St. JUNEAU !
W. H. Cl.KVKl.AND P. J. Cl.EVKl.ANU |
Contractors-Builders ?
Estimates Furnished Free Upon J
Request 1
Good Mechanics, Good Material, <
Best Results [
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m. !
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. J
'PHONE?209 | <
i
; PSYCHIC HEADER HERE | I
Madam Cheirona, palmist and |
pliychic reader, of London, Eng
land. has located temporarily In ?
the JolniHon Cottage, Second | *'
and Main St. Readings strict- I ?
Iv confidential. | '
*. * 1
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer <
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Ex
cursion Inlet. Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo. Chatham and
Sitka 8:00 a. m. April 4, 10, 16,
22, 28: May 4. 10, 16. 22. 28;
June 3, 3, 15, 21, 27; July 3. 9,
16, 21, 27; August 2, 8. 14, 20,
26; September 1, 7, 13, 19,
and 25
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th. August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eklred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2, 8, 14, 20, 26; June 1, 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12. 18, 24, 30; September
5. 11. 17, 23, and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Ataxics Flyer HUMBOLDT I The A In *k:? Flyer
NORTHBOUND APRIL 21
SOUTHBOUND APRIL 22
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olfice, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
-M-*1 1 I 1 I 1 1 -I I 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 I H 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1 1 11 ! 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1
I W\ ALASKA I
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle. Tacoma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through ??
ticket* to San Franciaco
JEFFERSON Northbound ....APR. 7 Southbound.... APR. 8
;; NORTHWESTERN Northb'd. . APR. 12 Southbound.... APR. 19 T
S. S. MARIPOSA Southbound APR. 9
ALAMEDA Northbound APR. 22 Southbound.... APR. 29 ?!?
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. ?
-M-H-H 1 1 I I 'I 'I ?I"li,I II H-l-M-M-H-H-I-H-l I I I 1 I I M-M-M II I 1 1 H-M
?</?????????????>????????????????????????
? |M /\ txyi || A|kjr\ Al,en Shattuck* A0ent' 0fficc J
* I lVx l? I I 1 I f \ 1^11/ wlt^ Juneau Transfer Co. X
[ X
n. i ? John Henson, Douglas Agent Y
Steamship Company ;
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU X
I Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, April 14, 26 |
* , c 1.1.1 First Class ?19.00 t
j rare to oeattle second ciass $12.00 |
n n 11 m 1111111111111 ii 11111111111 ii i ii 11111111111
: ALASKA COAST CO. ii
? For Vakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
I ' 1 Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
I S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON APRIL 18 !!
; S. S. YUKON APRIL 24 ; |
;; SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON APRIL 26
' S. S. YUKON MAY 4 !!
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? .
11 S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
KH44 I I H I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ;>
SEATTLE, TACOMA,
a Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympla, Port Townsend, ?
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, <?
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ^
I C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D.
x 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle o
? S. S. SPOKANE North APril 10-22 south Apr. 11-23 o
t CITY OF SEATTLE North APril 16-28?South April 5-17-29 o
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. "
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simp.ion. Prince Hupcrt, Swannon. Alert Hay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK APRIL 23
Front and Seward SU. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT. A*t. j
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS. TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
L.v. Juneau for
Douglas and
Tread well
?S:00 a. ir..
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. ra.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8 :25 a. m. j
9:25 a. m. j
12:00 noc n I
1:40 p. m. [
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaven
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. j
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. ra
5:30 p.m. |
7:05 p.m. i
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 i>. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nitcht Only
I 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule wimp as above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 u. m. i* omitted |
We"Are (Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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