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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 23, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-04-23/ed-1/seq-3/

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: JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. ]
iWe have for the table the
CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES ij
? FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH
I Tfl. 9-4 RYE AND BOURBON Front St. 1
? o
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads. Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
+ ?
? Juneau Transfer Co. i
j COAL WOOD ?
? STORAGE |
? J
J Moving Carefully Done ?
| Baggage Our Long Suit ?
FRONT STREET |
t Next door to Raymond Co. ?
| E. D. Watfeins jj
I EXPERT BLACKSMITH
; and IRON WORKER I
? General Blacksmithing, Horse- ?
0 Shoeing. Iron and Marine Work ^
J Estimates Furnished and j
J Work Guaranteed ?
? FRANKLIN STREET ?
J Union Iron Works Building ?
? ?
! !
j McCloskeys j
The Louvre Bar ::
) A! Cartaun/Prop. . ?
T Imported andiDomestic
[ LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
[ RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT
r ? ' 1
r Phone 3-3-5 J uneau . ?
i I i i 1 I I I I I I i I I I I I i i I I I I 1
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St Juneau, Alaska
?
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
Stationery Store
Dealer in all kinds of station
ery, office supplies, typewriter
supplies.
Agent for the
L. C. Smith & Bro. Type
writer
[ F. Wolland I
I Tailor j
: :
II Phone 66 SECOND ST. ?
Berry's Store
Rain Coats Children's Coats
Ladies Fine Muslin UNDERWEAR
> HI 1 II I I I I I I I It I I II I I I I I I
:; The [Alaska Grill ? I
.. The Beit Appointed
> Plate in Town J
;; Best of Everything: Served !
!' at Moderate Prices ;;
:??1111111n M111111111111
0 THE BEST LOAF OF ?
1 BREAD I
X It Sold At t
* San Francisco Bakery ?
| G. MESSERSCBMIDT. Prop. J
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vlce-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. rOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
i
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
?
Memorial For Federal
Building Causes Talk Fest
(Continued from Page 1.)
people were the salt of the earth aud
entitled to consideration. It was his
belief that the capital of this great
country with its countless millions of
wealth and destined to be millions of
peaople should have their capital city
at a point accesible to all. There was
no place that was so ideally situated
as the metropolis of the Tanana val
ley. Fairbanks was the proper place
for the Territory to build its capital.
Speaker Collins called Mr. Kelly
to the chair and made an impassioned
address that roused a storm. "1 heart
ily agree with the gentleman from
the Second division," said the hand
some representative from Fox, "there
is but one logical point for the loca
1 lion of a capital city and that is in
the center of wealth and popula
tion. Come with me and I will show
you the grandest and most product
ive valley on God's green earth.
Fairbanks, Alaska's Golden Heart, is
i
} ideally situated. With untold and in
exhaustible mineral wealth and the
richest of lands this great Tanana
valley is to be the homes of millions
i of people who are prosperous and
happy. Certain to be the center of a
great network of railroads and the
commercial mart of this vast empire,
centrally located and having every
advantage that a capital should have,
why should we vote to build an ex
pensive building here in Juneau that
may have to be torn down."
Representative Shoup attempted to
gain the floor but the Speaker aud
Mr. Kelly Were changing chairs and
he was uot recognized.
Representative Dan. Driscoll tak
ing it for granted he had the floor,
and could hold it began a flow of
oratory that made the chairs dunce.
He was indignant that they should
be even asked to consider a bill of
this nature. Not that he was opposed
to a capital building. "But." he said,
"if we are to have a federal building
let us build it in Alaska, build it in
Knik, Valdez or some other point in
I the Territory. Why you fellows down
j here seem to think you are the terri
tory and entitled to everything. I ask
: you what are we to get. Fairbanks
! has never got anything. You want
| to centralize everything down around
i this little wart of a place that isn't
even in the territory."
There were cries of questions from
all overthe hall, as Shoup attempted
to gain the floor. The Speaker rec
ognized the gentleman from Sitka.
"I say to you gentlemen from the
Second. Third and Fourth Divisions,
that Juneau's claim to the capital is
founded on sound reasoning and the
facts will bear me out. Juneau is
the most centrally located spot in all
Alaska.
It doesn't make any difference in
what part of the Territory one lives
in. he mvst pass through the city of
Juneau to reach it. It doesn't mat
ter whether he travels in winter or
summer. The man from Nome in or
der to reach either of these points in
the summer time must also pass
through Juneau. So, if destined for
the States during the winter he must
pass through Juneau. So, 1 say the
point so far as central location is
concerned is all in favor of Juneau.
I will not take issue with you gen
tlemen on the other advantages that
have been pointed out but it seems
to me I heard some wails of poverty
f-om those sections of inexhaustible
millions when the eight-hour bill was
under consideration." Here he was
interrupted by cries of question, ques
tion.?but Mr. Shoup had attempted
to read a resolution asking that the
First Division be cut off from the bal-1
ance of Alaska. It was hurriedly done)
while the other members were un
mercifully grilling the claims of Ju
neau.
Col. Ingersoll, the representative
bate had declared that he was willing
from Ketchikan who early in the de
to move the capital to Ketchikan,
managed to squeeze in a few words in
favor of the position taken by Mr.
Shoup, but he was called to order as
having used his time.
Representative Aldrich. of Nome,
said that he heartily endorsed every
word that had been said by his col
league from Nome and by the gen
tleman from the Fourth.
The vote on the final passage of
the memorial was called for. Aldrich
answered "No.". Then as the roll
was called down the line, Boyle,
Driscoll, GafTney, Ingram. Ingersoll,
and all the opponents answered in
the affirmative?Shoup's face was a
study. Just before the vote was an
nounced Aldrich asked permission to
change his vote. "Well," said Shoup,
"you got a rise out of me all right,
but I got your votes, and I'm satis
fied."
The Objection.
"What is your objection to this new
! five cent coin?"
"They didn't go far enough and
make it sufficiently funny to give you
the satisfactionof a laugh."
A truly accomplished fault-finder is
never Introspective.
A complete line of iobacco 1ars and
pipe racks at BURFORDS.
QUIMBY'S STORY Of
TORNOW'S DEATH
Giles Quiraby, the Chehalis County
deputy sheriff, who killed John Tor,
now. the wild maniac of the Olym
pics who had assassinated seven or
eight men during the course of his
murderous career of a year and a
half, tells this story of the battle in
which the outlaw lost his life, but not
until the lutter had killed two men:
"We found the carcass of an elk
about 4 o'clock in the afternoon and
later discovered the trail leading to
where the kill killing occurred. As
we were making otr way through the
woods 1 cautioned the men to be
more careful and 1 swung out to one
side. We went carefully through the
woods and a few minutes later dis
covered tracks in the snow. We fol
lowed the tracks and made our way
along, coming suddenly upon a small
cabin In a clearing. I was 50 to 75
feet away from Blair and Lathrop
farther around to approach it from'
and when 1 saw the cabin 1 swung
'the rear. Just as I gained about 101
yards I heard the crack of a gun and i
jumped behind a tree, and as I did I j
i saw Blair stagger and fall and im-|
mediately saw Turnow shoot from!
behind a small hemlock at Lathrop,'
who also fell in his tracks.
Never Had a Chance.
"Turnow was not more than six j
i feet from the men and they never had !
|a chance for their lives, all shots;
| being fired too close together. Tur-1
; now began to shoot at the bodies as i
they lay on the ground. l>athrop was j
I evidently killed instantly, dui uiair
squirmed until he was shot to death. J
All this time 1 was firing at Turnow
every time he stuck his head from
behind the tree to fire at the dead
I men, and the last shot 1 fired seemed
to have struck him as his head sank
on his breast and he fell from sight.
: 1 thought this might be a ruse to get
i me from cover and just then the dogs
I ran to the spot and began baying. I
waited behind the tree with my gun
covering the spot for 10 minuets, then
came out to give the alarm. 1 was
about 75 feet from Turnow during the
shooting, but could only see his head."
Tornow Shot Twice,
It was discovered when Turnow's
body was found the next day that he
had been shot twice. One at least of
the shots was probably fired by Lath
rop. That was a shoulder wound,
i and it is believed that it might have
been the cause of saving the life of
Quimby.
Deputy Sheriff Quimby will prob
ably receive the reward offered by the
State of $1,000 for the capture of Tur
ntfw, dead or alive. Other rewards
offered amounted to $2,000.
A brother of Turnow, Fred C. Tur
now, is a resident of Portland, Ore
gon. where he is a member of a tim
ber cruising firm.
GLEANINGS FROM GREAT
NORTHERN EMPIRE
Arthur Gibson, the Nome surveyor
and engineer, has been appointed
Swedish vice- counsel at that place.
The low price of meats at Nome this
winter caused the reindeer market to
close much earliet rhan usual. The
natives were disappointed at the re-1
suits of the winter sales.
Chena elected E. W. Grirrin, w. s.
L&ymon, Levi Lindgren, Charles R.
Chri8tensen, Fred Baxter and Herb.
Tachelson councilmen at the election
held the first day of the present
month.
Although they had a quiet election
at Fairbanks that city cast 43 votes
more this year than it did last year.
The total vote was one short of 700.
Fairbanks papers think the vote an in
dication that the population is grow
ing. . *'
Gabe Anderson, a prominent Ko
buj< miner, died February 25 at Can
dle, of cancer.
The Arctic Brotherhood camp at
Cleary in the Tanana country has
been giving regular bi-weekly danceB.
They will continue until about June
1st.
Most of the miners in the Salcha
district, Tanana valley, have spent the
winter trapping for furs, according to
Al. Wissell, an old Alaskan pioneer,
who recently visited the section. How
'ever there has been some mining
on Twenty-mile creek and Pasco
creek.
The Rexall mine on Wolf creek is
producing quartz that is worth $100
a ton, according to reports as late as
April 1st. It is milling ore right
along.
Good pay has been discovered on
Slate creek in the Iditarod district.
Options were being taken on the
claims of that creek early in March.
They are said to run $2 to the foot.
A fire in Kaiser's Studio, Front
street, Nome, March 1, did damage
to the extent of $300.
Jack Dalton, the miner who took
out $84,000 from Discovery claim on
Eureka creek in the Kantishna dis
trict is still working in that coun
try. Small quantities of gold are be
ing taken out of the country every
year by a few miners.
On the Totatlanlka river, there will
be three outfits at work during the
coming summer, according to the
statement of John Murphy, one of the
mining men of that district.
NEW STEAMER LINE "
EOR KOYUKUK
FAIRBANKS, April 3?The Koku
kuk Trading ami Transportation Com
pany is the name of the new organiza
tion which was launched in Fairbanks
yesterday. The purpose of the new
company is to operate a line of small
steamers from the mouth of the Koyu
kuk river, to the headwaters of that
stream. Two boats will be put into
commission during the coming sum- x*
mer, the steamer Dusty Diamond and j
the Ben Hur. I J
The company is now arranging forjl
the first cargo of the Dusty Diamond,1 T
now lying in the vicinity of Fairbanks.; J
This boat will leave the city immeci- ?h
lately after the opening of naviga- -H
tion and, following the ice down the T
river will land supplies on the Koyu- T
kuk as soon as possible. As far as is
now known, the first cargo will con- !!
sist of supplies for the town of "
Hughes, and all the upper Koyukuk, ??
as well as horses for the Indian river ..
diggings. |
The steamer Ben Hur, now winter- +*
ing on the south fork of the Koyu- *
kuk, will be placed in commission as j o
soon as possible. o
The men who compose the new or- o
ganization think that they can land j
supplies and freight for the upper Koy- ''
ukuk merchants and miners cheaper o
than they have ever been landed be
fore. It has heretofore been neces-j^
Bary for the people on the upper end | <?
of the river to transport their supplies o
from Bettles, at. an extra cost of I < >
money and energy, and the promot
ers of the- new enterprise think all +
that can be eliminated. j -
; I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I M
: A D Transfer 3
:: A. iSenson & e^s 1
Stand nt Wills' Grocery Store 5
| | Phone 1*".' j
< ? ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED 1
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I II I
Robt. Simpson, Opt.D.
GLASSES FITTED
R.Iri Reasonable
Office temporarily with Dr. Harrison
Over Ri ymond Company
i'M'I I I I -I I I I I ?! 1 I I I I I I I I I I-1-;
:: Juneau Electrical ?
:: Supply House :
Wiring and Repairing
a Specialty.
?? Telephone 3-7-3 SECOND STREET ?
?? P.O. Box 481! Bet. Main & Sownrd ?
J- E. CHOVIN
T'l I I 1 1 M I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I ; I !? K
|'I m 1 ?1"1"1 I-Mil 1 I"I" |
:: Golden Belt Addition!
'" Choice Residence Lots for Sale 1j
? ? See B. L. COBB. Ajrt. - Phone M4 ?
?III m I 1 I I'M I'M I I I 1 III 11 H
^ "1 I 1 1 1"! I 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I 1 H
The 'Model' |
This Is a
RESTAURANT
?; Fred Vinton Tom McMullen ;;
id 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1'1'M I'M M 1 l-H
I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
? A.W.RHODES ? :
:: E&J wall paper :
; I STOCK ,
' ' All Kinds interior Finish. Hou?e P.iminfl '
, Phone 3-7-3 Second Street ,
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I III
Tire-Proof Buildings
Cheap as Wooden Structures
Plans and specifications for
reinforced concrete buildings
and piles, and cement houses,
prepared by
C. K. FORNER, Engineer,
Juneau, Alaska
stfj?5
~t Absolutely Seif-con
taincdi ready to operate
on arrival;
^ Cost rriunnahlt: rflirirnt arul
1 durable; ratify thtrnml to
tr remolr poinlt; nrrtu no
tprcla {foundation.
One patron write*: "Wc are uxlmr
a 35-inexh screen nn<l milling nn
average of 10 ton* of ore per 24-liour
day with citeh mill. C o n * I d e r 1 n c
horaejiower consumed LITTLE GIANT
STAMP MILLS are moat rapid cruah
era ever *oon: prefer them to any
other atainp mill on market."
Information obtainable by address
ing or calling on
Seattle Construction & Drydock Company
Dept.. K Seattle, TJ. S. A.
HEIDELBERG UQUOR Co
. "House of Good Drinks"
BEST APPOINTED PLACE IN TOWN
Dairies nothing but the finest quality of goods. Family
Trade Solicited
Telephone 386?QUICK DELIVERY
H~H M 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 I MM 1 II l-l-l-l M 1 I 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 H
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan "
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. MiiRr. JUNEAU. ALAS<A
II 1 1 11 IT I 1 Mill 1 1 I 1 1 ?!
1 -I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I M 1 1 11 1 1 1 I II II I 1 1 1 M 1"1 1"! 111'1 III I '1 I M 1 II" '
THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL
MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop.
HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN::
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED
THIRD STREET JUNEAU. ALASKA;;
I 1 1 I 11 1 I 1 -H -M 1 1 I1111 '1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 T 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 !? I LH-H-H-H'
OPERA LIQUOR CO., i?. j
Thos. H. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Hays, Sec.-Treas. X
COR. SEWARI) AND SECOND STREETS ?
?
?
?
Pinest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Pverybody Likes to Smoke ?
?
A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN J
?
? T - Cleaned and Blocked
riats juneau
? w CLEANING AND DYE WORKS
SECOND STREET, BETWEEN SEWARD AND FRANKLIN STREETS
B.M. BEHRENDS, BANKER
JUNEAU, ALASKA
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
Established 1887
Interest Paid on Member
Savings Accounts American Bankers' A'ssn.
I t 1 I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ? I I I ? I I I I I I I I I I I I ??i
WHEN YOU NEED ;;
Furniture, Mattresses, Stoves, Ranges!!
Cooking Utensils or Crockery
and vou want full value for your money tro to ! |
JOHN P. BENSON, the Furniture Dealer; j
Cor. Third and Seward Streets. Juneau . .
Tons upon tons of r.ctt and up-to-date goods arrive at our store every week-.
I II II I It I I M I I I I I I I HI I I I II I I I I I 1 I M II II I II 1 I I I I I I I I
l"l-I"l"l' 1 I I MM I 1 1 1 1 I 1 MH I 1 1 1 1 MM Ml MI 1 I 1 I I I I ! I II I I I
House Cleaning Phone J?c'eani?*|
Window Washing 2-?-8 overwork. i!
I'TT I ?! I MmImI-ImK-H-H-I"!1 1'1 I 1 i H-H-H I'M MI ?!?!?!? i -I--1 M I-l-I
vjjj"America's Finest Flouring Mills"
Plant and Product
one anc^ inseParab!e
Pronounced by experts "America's Finest Flouring
-J Mills," the plant of the Fisher Flouring Mil.s
/ Company, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Every grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It IS no line uuasi m say uut tin*
product is the cleanest, most scit n
titically blended, most ceonomii al
flour offered for sale today. Combin
ing as it does Eastern Hard \Vh<at
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of both hard and soft wheat flou's,
is In-tter than either, and decidedly
superior to any other blend hereto
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Fisher's BLEND
Call At ~
"HOME BAKERY"
For Home-Made Pies, Cakes and
Bread.
F. F. Graff?Propr.
SECOND ST.?Opp. Customs House
I I I 1 I I 1 I 1 1 I Ml 1 lllll'll y-HH
t The Unique Millinei'y;;
Easter Goods
jl Upstairs, Cor. Second and Main !
??! Ill I 1 I III I I 111 III I I I I 1 I i'

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