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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 25, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-04-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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? JUNEAl" LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. ?
? o
\ I We have for the table the < * i
| CRESTA BMNCA AND EL DORADO WINES il
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FINE 0L1) BRANDY AND SCOTCH ]||
< ? Tel. 9-4 RYE AND BOURBON Front St. X
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OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATERS
FOR SALE AT ALL FiRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
II i III
1 ?'
UNION IRON WORKS Machii? shop and Foundry
(?as Engine* and Mill Castings
Agent* Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
.Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads. Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
? t
? Juneau Transfer Co. |
: coal wood it
storage i:
?
J Moving Carefully Done <?
^ Baggage Our Long Suit < ?
FRONT STREET ;;
S Next door to Raymond Co. < *
? E. D. Watkins \
| EXPERT BLACKSMITH |
J and IRON WORKER {
? General Blacksmlthing, Horse- +
? Shoeing. Iron and Marine Work ^
J Estimates Furnished and ?
? Work Guaranteed ?
$ FRANKLIN STREET ?
? Union Iron Works Building *
? f
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?
? ?
? <?
?
j McCloskeys j
? ?
! ::
t ?
f ?
? ::
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?
11;; i! i; 11 ii:i11i111111111
The Louvre Bar ::
\' A1 Carbon/Prop. ZZ
* j Imported andiDomeatic ? ?
:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS ?'
" I RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT "'
'm j Phone 3-3-5 J uneau ? ?
r i: 111111111 1111111111111
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
Stationery Store
Dealer in all kinds of station
ery, office supplies, typewriter
supplies.
Agent for the
L. C. Smith & Bro. Type
writer
11 Wolland !
? +
| Tailor j
I Phono *56 SECOND ST. ?
Berry's Store
Rain Coats Children's Coats
Ladies Fine Muslin UNDFRWEAR
111111111.1111111111111111
:; The Alaska Grill 11
The Best Appointed
.. Place in 1 own J
;; Best of Everything Served !!
at Moderate Prices ;;
i in''
i ?
THE BEST LOAF OF O
* BREAD I
Is Sold At t
?j San Francisco Bakery ?
<? G. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop. I
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK, Vlce-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. \V. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
.
?????
Latest Novelties in
T obacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
I
Glcamings From Great
?\
Northern Empire
Mel. U. Sabin recently has been
road overseer for the Fairbanks sec
tion by Judge John P. Dillon, United
States commissioner for the Fair
banks district. His bond was (lxed
at $10,000.
* * *
J. E. Moody was elected to be a i
member of the school board at Fair
banks over Frank Clark early in the
present month by a vote of 506 to 451.
The total vote was 961.
* * *
The Little Straub mill at the Rain
bow mine on Twin creek, In the Fair
banks district, having made its test
runs in good style, is now engaged in
pounding rock every day, according to
the News-Miner. There is at pres
ent, plenty of ore on the dump to
keep the mill running for some days,
although a large crew of men will
soon be put on, and stoping commence
immediately after.
? * *
Two different dredging companies
will be operating their machines on
Gaines and Yankee creeks this sum
mer, in the Innoko country. One is
a San Francisco concern, and the other
is a company which was organized in
St. Louis. Representatives of both
companies are now at Ophlr City, and
five miles of ground on Gaines creek
and four miles on Yankee are already
under option. The ground is from 10
to 14 feet deep, which makes it a very
acceptable proposition fro dredges.
? * *
I On Cripple creek, a tributary of the |
Innoko river, coming in about 65 miles!
below the town of Ophir, considerable
work is being performed. Pay has al-:
so been located on Colorado creek
in the same vicinity. There are at |
least five outfits on Cripple creek that I
are working in good pay.
* * *
Mrs. Emma McMullen, a pioneer of
the Fairbanks country, died at the
Tanana metropolis April 1st of tuber
culosis. She was 36 years of age and
had lived in the Fairbanks country for
! the last 10 years. Her relatives reside |
| at Seattle.
? * *
It is reported that the stock of the
Gold Bar Lumber Company, that was
among the assets of the Washington
Alaska bank at Fairbanks, will be
i sold and that it will more than pay oft'
the indebtedness of that bank to the
Dexter Morton National bank of Seat
tle. However, the latter bank has be
gun suit against the bank and is for
closing on the stock.
? * *
A new discovery of pay on a trib
utary of Bottom Dollar creek in the
Circle district, is reported by the dis
covery made during the winter by Tom
Powers, acording to report, and the
prospector has demonstrated that val
ues are contained in the gravel body
he has discovered.
? ? ?
Ths British Columbia Fisheries,
with headquarters at Prince Rupert,
will install a cold storage plant at
Port Edward near that place.
? * *
Judge Frederic E. Fuller, of the
United States district court at Fair
banks, heard 28 applications for citi
zenship papers at one hearing this
month.
* * *
Len De Cou, a mining man of Ruby,
while in Fairbanks April 5. estimated
the summer's output of the Ruby dis
trict at $700,000. He said 200 men are
working on Long creek, which will be
the biggest producer in that country
this year.
* * *
The late winter traflic from Ruby
to the creeks in that district was very
large. The sawmills were kept busy
filling orders for lumber with which
to build houses and use in mining op
erations. All the freighters in the
country were busy.
* * ?
Prince Rupert Eagles contributed
$260 to the Ohio flood sufferers. The
money was the profit of an entertain
ment given as a benefit.
? * *
Orville Iliff, a well known Prince
Rupert fisherman, was drowned last
week at that place.
* * ?
William Larsen. an employee of the
Atlin Fisheries Company, of Prince
Rupert, who had been shooting wild
geese for his employers accideutly dis
charged a- load of geese shot into him
self last week, and it is believed that
he will die.
Road Tax Law Obnoxious.
The eight-dollar road tax iaw is one
of the most iniquitous ard obnoxious
ever foisted upon the peop e of Alaska,
and Senator Roden, it goes without
stying, will have the hearty support
" of all Alaskans in his, attempt to abol
ish it.?Ruby Recorc Citizen.
AFTER MONOPOLISTS
The worthy citizen who has hereto
fore been pluming himself on reading
all of a President's message now finds
i his occupation gone. Nearly every
! body can read a short Presidential
address and probably nearly every
one did.?New York World.
A complete line of tobacco lars and
pipe racks at BURFORDS.
WOMAN MUSHES j
WITH iNJURED ARM
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Eckert have re
turned from nearly a year spent in the
Big Salmon country and left on the >
Humboldt this afternoon for the South,
with the intention of making their
home In Oregon. They wont as far
as the head of South Fork of the Big
Salmon and spent the season in pros
pecting and trapping. They exper
ienced the usual hardship in mushing
i nand out of the country and were not
successful in locating anything that
look like rich pay, though tehy arc
of the opinion that many parts of the
district are rich.
While coming out over the trail,
Mrs. Eckert fell on the ice and severe
ly injured her arm, which she has car
ried in a sling during most of a Jour-j
ney of 160 miles.
BRYAN SPEAKS ON
RELIGIOUS MATTERS j
i
WASHINGTON, April 19.?Deelar-1
ing that the soul was of greater im-1
portance than the mind or body, Sec-j
retary of State Bryan spoke before a
large audience of young men at the Co
lumbia theatre the other day, in the
first of a series of addresses which
he will deliver before the Bryan Bible J
Class. Mr. Bryan told his audience
of his indebtedness to. Christian re
ligion, and at his request they sang,
"I'll Go Where You Want Me to Go."
The spirit of this song, he declared,
had moved him to accept invitations
to speak on religious topics.
Scoffs at Skepticism.
The Secretary of State scoffed at
the young man who was skeptical
about religiou. "Nothing that Chris
tianity takes from a man's life is worth
keeping," he asserted. "When Christ
came into the world He added greatly
to man's physical and intellectual en
joyment. 1 want to show young men
that it is not smart to be skeptic, and
I want to leave 110 justification for
the expression 'more liberal than
Christian.' There is no basis for the
implication that Christians are not lib
eral."
Smal Time Spent on Souls.
The little time people spend on their
souls compared with that they put on
their body was contrasted by Secre
tary Bryan, who went on to declare
that "if spiritual hunger hurt as
much as physical hunger, it wouldn't
he so hard to get men to use the sci
ence of living what Christ teaches.
WHAT FREE WOOL WILL
- DO FOR AMERICA
Francis Burton Harrison, of New
York, a member of the ways and
means committee of the National
House of Representatives, ranking
second to Chairman Underwood, writ
ing for the New York Wolrd on free
wool and what it will do for the peo
ple says:
"What would free wool mean to the
people of the United States? It would
mean cheaper and better woollen
clothes. That is why we hope that the
people will uphold President Wilson in
his fight for free wool and against the
great wool and woollen combination.
Free woool would also mean the death
knell of this great combination, which
has for forty years burdened the
American people with extortionate tax
ation.
"This combination between the wool
growers of the West and the woollen
manufacturers of the East has for the
greater part of forty years had votes
enough In Congress to keep the taxes
sky high on woollen clothes. The com
bination was too strong for President
Taft; he frankly told the people of the
United States that this combination
was powerful enough to prevent the
Republicans in the Payne-Aldrich tariff
from lowering the duties on woollen
clothing.
"This admission by President Taft
was fatal to his party. His speech at
Winona, in which he made this frank
sand startling announcement of the
power of the combination, admitting
that it was stronger than President
Taft himself and the Republican Con
gress, and stronger than the Govern
ment of the United States, under Re
publican rule, caused the people of our
country to take away from these peo
ple the administration of our country
and give it to the Democrats."
Oyster-lovers, go to "U and 1"
Lunch Room. 4-14-lm,
HUNTERS AND TRAPPERS:
Highest cash price paid for all kinds
of raw furs at Will's store. 4-7-tf
Mind Reading
"I am sure that girl has a kinc
heart and a considerate disposition,'
said the young man.
"Why?"
"Because when I asked what hei
favorite flower was, she took care t<
name something that doesn't cost mor<
than 50 cents a bunch."
i
I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I j
1 ;; A D Transfer J
;; A. Denson & Express j
1 ' Stand at Willa' Grocery Store 1
| | Phone 4*9 1
1 ? ? ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED 3
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I
PAPER AND PULP MILLS
COMING TO ALASKA
" |
Two American paper manufacturing
companies, according to information
given out by the United States Fores
try Bureau at Washington, have each
applied for the right to purchase 500,
000,000 feet of timber in Aluska to be
used in the manufacture of wood pulp,
about the only purpose for which a
large portion of the wood in Alaska
can be utilized.
While the forestry department re- ?
fuses to give out the names of the "j"
companies making the applications, it I..
is said by an oflicinl of the bureau that j"
the plan proposed by the applicants is I ? ?
to erect two pulp-manufacturing mills [..
in Alaska and to ship the pulp to pa-1""
per mills located In different parts of ?
the United States. The shores of Brit- +
ish Columbia Immediately south of v
the Alaska boundary are dotted with ..
paper and pulp mills. Much Seattle
money is invested Ih them. The tim-l"
ber on the Pacific seaboard of the Do
minion of Canada is much the same as I]
that of lAaska. and consists of Sitka
spruce and hemlock.
If industrial conditions are favorable j]
paper mills will be established in 4
Alaska, but in any event a large J]
amount of the pulp will be shipped to
paper companies in the Eastern States <
through the Panama canal. <[
Each of the two applications 011 file J
with the forestry bureau Is for pur- <
chase of 500,000,000 feet of timber, sit- <
uated in the Chugach forest close, J
to the shore line. If the propose pur- <
chases are approved by the forestry <
department the mills will be estab- *
lished at points in Southeastern Alas- <
ka not yet determined upon, and a <
new industry will have been estab-! *
lished in Alaska to assist in the de
1 velopment of that territory.?Seattle
Times.
Forced out of business by owner of
? building. Sale to run only 10 more
days. tf.
J. J. SHARRICK.
i
Robt. Simpson, Opt.O.
GLASSES FITTED
R?tn KclMRiEilr
Office temporarily with Dr. Harmon
Over Raymond Compnny
:
f I I I'M I I I I I I I I 1 I M I I I I I I It I
:: Juneau Electrical ::
!:: Supply House
Wiring and Repairing ;?
a Specialty. ? ? .
? ? ? ? (
? ? ? ? I
?? Telephone 3-7-3 SECOND STREET ?? '
? * P. O. Box 482 Bet. Main & Seward ? ? 1
J- E. CHOVIN
III H-M-H 1 1 I I 1 1 M-M-M-M-M-* '
I H I I I H-HH-f i
:: Golden Belt Addition
Choice Residence Lota for Sale j ] 1
? ? See E. L. COBB. Atrt. - Phone 3-0-9 ? ? .
?MM l"!11 I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I 1 1 I 1"H- ?
? j.-H-1-l I I I I I I I I 1 I 1 I I I H"I I 1 1-jl
The 'Model'I
::
This Is a
RESTAURANT
? ?
;; Fred Vinton Tom McMullen ;;
*1"1 I 11 I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 III I 1 III
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
A.W.RHODES "
:: ?ECIC WALL PAPER ::
| All Kindn interior Finish. Il<.u?r Palotlnj ' '
, i Phone 3-7-3 Second Street , ,
I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
Fire-Proof Buildings
Cheap as Wooden Structures
PlanB and specifications for
reinforced concrete buildings
and piles, and cement houses,
prepared by
C. K. FORNER, Engineer,
Juneau, Alaska
I&k-J
TpianO
Stamp j
Mill
3BS0LUTELY Self-Con
tained,; ready to operate
on arrival;
Con reasonable: efficient and
^ durable; easily shipped to
remote points; nerds no
special foundation.
One patron wrltea: "Wo Hrc nalng
n 83-meah acreen nn<l milling nn
average of 10 tona of oro por IM-hour
? day xvltli each mill. Oonalderlng
> bome|>ower rnnuumed I.ITTI.K GIANT
> STAMP MII.I.S are moat rnpld cruah
? era ever aeon: prefer tliom to any
? other afamp mill on market."
? Information obtainable by addreaa
? Ittg or culling 011
! Seattle Construction & Drydcck Company j
' K
Dept.. Seattle, V. 8. A.
h 11
HEIDELBERG LIQUOR Co
"House of Good Drinks"
BEST APPOINTED PLACE IN TOWN
Dairies nothing but the finest quality of goods. Family
Trade Solicited
Telephone 386?QUICK DELIVERY
I I I 1 II 1 1 N H"1"I I-I-l-1' I'-H-H-M-1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 M-H?
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
Restaurant In Connection Established loSl European Plan **
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mtlgr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
?H-l-l-l-l ?! Ill 1 H 1 I 1' 1 I-I- l-I-l-l-1 III 1 I-I-I-I I I I 1 I 1 I I :-fr
?i-M-H-i I I I I I I I ?!??! I' !? 1- I-f-h I I I 1 I I I I 1 I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 I 1 I I It Mil- ?
THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL
MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop. y
HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED -
THIRD STREET JUNEAU, ALASKA *j
1la..t..i..t..i..i..i..i^..i..i..i..i..i..i..i..i..i..|..|..|..|..i..i..i..|-i..i..i..i..i i .1 ?!.[ | i .| b wh4 m-t-h-f
j OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. 1
J Thos. H. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Rays, Sec.-Treas. i
; COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS *
\ finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke *
? A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN I
f ?
?_I ?_ Cleaned and Blocked
ilcltS JUNEAU
^ CLEANING AND DYE WORKS
SECOND STREET, BETWEEN SEWARD AND FRANKLIN STREETS
B.M. BEHRENDS, BANKER
JUNEAU. ALASKA
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA j
Established 1887
Intere? . Paid on Member
Savings Accounts American Rankers' A'ssn.
t I I I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I II I I I | |
|| WHEN YOU NEED "I
furniture, Mattresses, Stoves, Ranges:;
Cooking Utensils or Crockery ::
; and vou want full value for your money jro to ;;
:JOHN P. BENSON, the Furniture Dealer |
| Cor. Third and Seward Streets, Juneau
! Tons upon tons of nc>v and up-to-date goods arrive at our store every ?'.*ek? >
t m n n t m ?11 > 11111111 n 1111111111111 n i-h 11 ii 11111
:-H"M I I 1 I I H-M-M'H I M H"!-I-H
:: House Cleaning
i: Window Washing
Phone
2-0-8
I ?!' I 1 1 1 I !?
S-'H-I I 1 ! I i 1 I I 'M I H-I-+
Juneau Cleaning
and
Dyeing Works
m i i 11111 11 111 I : 11 ?
r "America's Finest Figuring Mills"
Plant and Product
o?ie and inseparable
IPronounced by experts "America's Finest Flouring
or Mills," tlic plant of the Fisher Flouring Mili's
f Company, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Every grain is washcd'in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It IS no KIIC DOasi lu s.iy luat
product is the cleanest, most scitn
tificnlly Mended, most economical
flour offered for sale today. Comb n
iiig as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of both hard and soft wheat flours,
is better than cither, and decidedly
superior to any other blend hcrcta
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Fisher's BLEND
> FLOUR
Call At ""
"HOME BAKERY"
For Home-Made Pies, Cakes and
Bread.
F. F. Graff?Propr.
SECOND ST.?Opp. Customs House 1
I I 1 I M 1 i 1 I 1 I I I l l i i i i | ; | | i i
ii The Unique Millinery:;
Easter Goods
II Upstairs, Cor. Second and Main ..
1 ill I MI 1 1 II I III II I 1 111 I 1 I

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