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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 26, 1913, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-04-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postoflice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mail ..$10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
AN UNFAIR AND UNMANLY ATTACK
A LEAFLET was circulated in Juneau this morning contain
ing a set of resolutions denouncing most of the members
of the Alaska Legislature from the First Division, and con
taining a foreword wherein it was said that the resolutions had
been adopted at a mass meeting held Thursday night, and which
charged that the Senate "ordered" the newspapers of Juneau
"not to print them and they were accordingly suppressed."
So far as The Empire is concerned the allegation that any-!
thing that it had accepted for publication was "suppressed" by:
the Legislature or any other authority is erroneous. The Em
pire refused to publish the resolutions of the so-called "mass"
meeting for the reason that there was no responsible or repre
sentative meeting behind them. They were prepared in advance
and adopted by less than a dozen men. They were in no manner
the result of the deliberations of a meeting. The dozen men
that had assembled in response to the call listened to no speeches
and made none. There was no discussion at all. It was not such
a meeting as could make "news" by passing resolutions. It would
not be fair to permit anybody to be attacked through a newspaper
by the publication of "resolutions" that had no more behind them
than the so-called resolutions of this so-called mass meeting.
It is the purpose of The Empire to publish all the legiti
mate news than it can discover and get into type that will be of
interest to its readers. It is also its purpose to give proper re
gard to its responsibilities as a newspaper. It understands, of
course, all public officers, and, particularly those acting in rep
representative capacity, are properly subject to criticism by |
newspapers and citizens generally. It is a newspaper's duty to;
its readers to see that fair criticisms fairly presented are given
publicity. It is no less its duty, however, to protect public offic
ials from unfair and malicious attack. No newspaper can right
fully permit a handful of people to launch shafts, even at legisla
tors, under the pretense that they are coming from the people
assembled in mass meeting.
If the few men that assembled at the city hall Thursday;
night in response to a call for a mass meeting had been prop
erly respectful of the equities and regardful of fair play they
would have gone home when they discovered how few of the
people of Juneau had massed at a mass meeting that had been
legitimately called for a perfectly proper purpose, instead of
using the call as an ambuscade from which to make an attack
in the name of the masses.
There is no evidence that President Wilson has any aversion
to work in timber, but the signs that he prefers sawing wood to
log-rolling are plentiful.
THE PEOPLE CAN BE DEPENDED UPON
SENATOR TANNER made a speech in the Senate the other
day in which he declared for the rule of the people in Alas
ka as elsewhere in the country. That is good Americanism
and sound doctrine. And it is safe and sane. There is no legiti
mate interest in this territory that will be made to suffer by
the people if they understand all that is to be known about a
question. The only innovation that is required in business meth
ods when the people are given authority to rule is more publicity
and more frankness in the discussion of matters. The states
where they have the initiative and referendum and the other
so-called progressive laws are making as great progress as arej
the states where they do not have them. The masses have no
more use for demogogues than have business men. They can
detect the false from the true, and they can be depended upon to
be fair if they have all the facts.
Pinchot and the other members of the hobby-horse cavalry
will not have the public treasury upon which to draw for funds
to maintain a press bureau in behalf of the movement to re-es
tablish the alliance between Roosevelt and freakism on the one
side and special privilege on the other that swayed the coun
try for nearly a decade.
ALLEGED PROGRESSIVES PREPARING TO COMBINE WITH
STANDPATTERS
FRANK MUNSEY, Dr. Abbott and other worshippers at the
shrine of The Colonel are having a terrible time of it over
the constantly growing popularity of President Wilson. They
had become so accustomed to the idea that The Colonel possessed
a corner on poularity in the United States that they took it for
granted that the people of the country would be as dissatisfied
with anything else than the "big stick" and the one man power
over everything as they were with the Taft administration. They
are amazed and disappointed because the people seemingly ap
prove the simple and direct Jeffersonian methods of thought and
action that are being introduced in the affairs of the country
by the President. They seem afraid that it will be demonstrated
that Democratic government can still succeed in the Nation, and
that there is no need for New Nationalism and a President vest
ed with imperial authority to govern outside the law.
So fearful are these people that it will be demonstrated that
the country can be run without the use of their hobby horses
that they are now ready to accept a high protective tariff and
all the other things to reform which the American people placed
Mr. Wilson at the head of the government, if only they can
save some of the Rooseveltian whims and The Colonel, himself,
from oblivion. They are now earnestly engaged in trying to
unite the two factions of the Republican party on such a ba
sis that The Colonel can become the regular Republican candi
date for President in 1916. It is said that Pinchot is ready to
join them in the movement. Of course, his price is the retention
of his "forests."?many of them without trees. If they can
be kept as sacred institutions, the protected barons can contin
ue to rob the people through high tariffs, and the money trust
can shape the financial legislation as they will. All he wants
is to save his brand of conservat ion.
In the meantime Senator La Follette, who seems to be inter
ested in the progressive movement as a means of making pro
gress, has caught the significance of the maneuvering of the hob
by-horse cavalry, and he has issued a clarion call for all pro
gressives to put shoulder to wheel and support the administra
tion of Wilson.
Webster Davis, formerly Mayor of Kansas City and famous
for his activity in behalf of the Boers at the time of the South
African war, is a candidate for Mayor of Los Angeles. If elect
ed, the dinners and other functions where the mayor appears
will be interesting affairs, for Webster is one of the great ora
tors of his generation.
PATIENT CHINA
China has been patient for centur
ies. Perhaps it can be so a little
longer.?Washington Star.
BASEBALL MEN HAVE CHANCE
With the popular election of sena
tors iu sight, it behooves Clark Grif
fith and Frank Chance to brush up on
parliamentary usage. ? Washington
Post.
For the Sake of Others.
"Have you ever done anything for
the sake of promoting the happiness
of others, without selfish reward?"
asked the idealist.
"I should say so," replied Mr.
Growcher. "1 have bought any quanti
ty of stock that never paid dividends."
Humerous, But Serious.
Mexico's reluctance to recognize
China because of unsettled conditions
in Asia is another of those thiugs that
would be humerous if they were not
so serious.?Washington Star.
livery thing that will pleas* a amok
er may be found at BUKKtlllli f
Clam chowder every day at "U and
1" Lunch Room. 4-14-lm.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
Whereas, on the 2nd day of April,
1913, an order of sale was issued out
of the District Court for Alaska, Di
vision No. 1, at Juneau, in the case
of British Columbia Development As
sociation, and Sir John George Craggs,
as Receiver of the assets of said asso
; ciation. vs. The North Pacific Wharves
& Trading Company, and to me direct
ed and delivered as Referee appointed
in said cause, commanding me to sell
as under execution all the right title
and interest which the said defendant
had. on the 9th day of August, 1907,
or at any time thereafter, in and to
the following described property* to
wit:
That certain wharf property, and
other properties, situated, lying and
being at, and immediately southeast
of the town of Skagway, Alaska,
known and held as and called "Moore's1
Wharf Property," together with the
wharf approaches to the same, and to
gether with the land beginning at the
north end of said approach to said
wharf and running and extending
south from and along the said Moore's
Wharf (aiong the bluff on the east
shore of Skagway Bay), to the wharf
now constructed, claimed and owned
by the Pacific & Arctic Railway &
Navigation Company the southernmost
terminus of the said wharf property
having originally been marked and
fixed by the southernmost ringbolt
placed on a point or rock on said
shore by William Moore, and together
with all property rights and franchis
es. privileges, warehouses and other
buildings and improvements, approach
es to said wharf, extensions, and all
other property of any other kind or
nature whatsoever being in or about
said Moore's Wharf at the time of
the making of said mortgage, and also
together with all and singular the fix
tures. Improvements, rights, privileges,
tenements, hereditaments, and appur
tenances, thereunto belonging or in
any wise appurtaiiling. and the rever
sion or reversions, remainder or re
mainders. rents issues and profits
thereof.
And also commanding me to sell as
under execution, all the right, title and
interest which the said defendant had,
on the 24th day of December. 1907. or
at any time thereafter, in and to the
following described property, towit:
Situated at or near Skagway. Alas
ka. and being all the right, title, and
interest of the defendant, the North
Pacific Wharves & Trading Company
in the lands, hereditaments, and prom
ises hereinafter specifically described,
together with all and singular the
buildings. improvements. fixtures,
rights of way and approach, and
all other rights, privileges, franchises,
easements, and appurtenances to the
same belonging or in any wise appur
taining, or held and enjoyed in con
nection therewith, or with any part
thereof, towit: The Sylvester Wharf,
and the the Fourth or Seattle Wharf,
both situated on the shore and fore
shore of Skagway Bay. Alaska: and
also all the freehold tract, lot, or par
cel of land lying and being in the town
of Skagway. and bounded as follows:
on the east by the White Pass & Yu
kon Railway's right of way. on the
west by the east line of Spring street,
on the south by the meander line of
Skagway Bay.
Now therefore. Notice is herebv giv
en that T will, on Thursay. the 8th day
of May. 1913. at the Court House door
in Juneau. Alaska, between the hours
of nine o'clock in the morning and
four o'clock in the afternoon, offer the
above described property for sale at
public outcry, to the highest bidder
for cash, the said offer being of each
of said properties as an entirety.
J. M. DAVIS. Referee.
Sympathy for Dr. Osier.
Some sympathy is due Dr. Osier
! for the way in which he is hauled in
to public scorn every time a man over
seventy does anything worth mention
ing.?Washington Post.
A Time Eaver
"What qualilication has that man
for so high an oflicial position in our
company?"
"He can sign his name oftener in
a given time than anybody else in the
shop."
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska.
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United j
I States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint-j
ed administrator of the estate of Gus-,
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with j
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at,
j his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO I.. A. Moore, Berta Jariny and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
j the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
, ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
i claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
' December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you. within ninety days
'after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
{law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
' by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
| terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofllce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5tb day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju-1
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON. |
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
?
.
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
?
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - - ? Alaska
| JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Building, Seattle
205 Seward St. JUNEAU
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
Contractors-Builders
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILI.
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
'PHONE?209
J * ? # !
I ' PSYCHIC READER HERE |
.Madam Cheirona, palmist and (
phychlc reader, of London, Eng- '
land, has located temporarily in
the Johnson Cottage, Second
and .Main St. Readings strict- i
ly confidential.
*_ *
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Ex
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, Gypsum.
Tenakee, Killisnoo, Chatham and
Sitka 8:00 a. m. April 4, 10, 16,
22. 28: May 4. 10. 16. 22. 28;
June 3. 9. 15. 21. 27; July 3, 9,
15, 21, 27; August 2. 8, 14, 20,
26; September 1, 7, 13, 19,
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor. Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2. 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2. 8. 14. 20, 26; June 1, 7. 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6. 12. 18, 24, 30; September
5, 11. 17, 23. and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER j
11111II111111111 ?*i
Have Only
:: Ten Days
Greater
Reductions
? Than Ever.
4i m 111111111 n 11
111 h n 1111 ii 111111111111111111111 *
Forced Out of Business ii
By owner of Building. Had no lease. Must
Move in Thirty days and have no house to \ \
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;;
ware,Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;
c;?,"? | | charick;;
White & Hand 111 JEWELER
Pointed Chin* * *** and OPTICIAN
I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I II I I I I I I I I I ? t
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alnnka Flyer S, HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND MAY 3
SOUTHBOUND MAY 4
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Office, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
?i"H~H~l-H-H"l"l~l"l"l"l"H~I, l"l"l,ili M 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 I I 1 1 1 H 1 H 1 H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
W\ ALASKA f
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
?? Sufcty, Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle, Tncomn. Victoriu and Vnncouver. Through
?' tickets to San Francisco "
I JEFFERSON Northbound APRIL 27 Southbound. . .APRIL 28 y
ALAMEDA, Northbound APRIL 22 Southbound. . .APRIL 29 ||
MARIPOSA Northbound MAY 2 Southbound... MAY ? ]]
" MARIPOSA Northbound APRIL 22 Southbound.. .APRIL 29 ??
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. "?
?r-'H-l-H-l"!1 !?.!?.1 ?! ?! 1 -I -I I -I I-1 -I -11 I I I 1 1 !? H I 1 1 1 1 I
? ? ? ? ???????? ???????????? ????? ? ????
S lit I /\ r^"TTI B I L ft I rV Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
i INOKI mLAINIJ w,th juneau Tran?fer c? i
Z Z'
p. , ? /-* John Henson, Douglas Agent |
i Steamship Company |
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU ?
t Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, April 27 I
? r* j. C 1.1.1 First Class $19.00 f
? rare to oeattle seconder $12.00 ?
? ? s-s ? I ? I I I I I ?? I I I I I I I I I I
?H H II I I I H I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I n m . ? . .
:: ALASKA COAST CO. ij
For Vnkutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ??
!l Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU I!
II S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON MAY 8 II
!! S. S. YUKON APRIL 29 | ;
;; SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ||
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON APRIL 28 ;;
?' S. S. YUKON MAY 10 ? ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? >
|| S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ||
44-i 1 ; I I I I I I H-W.| I I II I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I II I I I I II I I I II
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. ;;
SEATTLE, TACOMA,
4 Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, | *
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, <?
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. o
$ C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D.
t 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle <?
1 S. S. SPOKANE North Mav 3-14-25?South May 4-15-26 o
I CITY OF SEATTLE North APril 28 South APril 29
? o
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. 4
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailini? from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert. Swnnson, Alert Kay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK APRIL 23
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE j. t. spickett. a*t.
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
A'. Juneau for
Doutrla.s and
Tread well
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
S: 00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trend
well for
Juneau
I *8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
j 12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaven
Douglas for
Juneau
] *8:30 a. m. Ij
i 9:30 a.m. (
! 12:05 p. m.
1:45 p.m. J
3:30 p. re
5:30 p.m. I
7:05 p.m.
8:30 p. m. I
9:30 p.m.
11:30 p.m. I
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau I
11:40 a. ra.
6:10 p. ra.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nijrht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule name on above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. is omitted |
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHI|NG
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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