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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 26, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-04-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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i JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. %
? ol
J We have for the table the JM
! CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES !!'
? o
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH ?>!
| Tel. 9-4 RYE AND BOURBON Front St. 1
n
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER'"
FOR SALF. AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Uniou Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Keck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads. Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
1 Juneau Transfer Co. ?
: COAL WOOD ?
? STORAGE I
J Moving Carefully Done +
J Baggage Our Long Suit +
? FRONT STREET ?
2 Next door to Rayir.ond Co. ?
??<???????????????????????
? E. D. Watkins |
? EXPERT BLACKSMITH ?
{ and IRON WORKER |
? General Blacksmithing. Horse- #
^ Shoeing, Iron and Marine Work ?
? Estimates Furnished and T
? Work Guaranteed ?
J FRANKLIN STREET ?
J Union Iron Works Building J
? ?
: :
i j
? ?
? ?
I McCloskeys i
? ================= ?
? o
? ?
? ?
? ?
! i
i i ?
II 11 i i i i 11 i i i 11111 n i i 1111
!77?e Louvre Bar ::
Al CarLton.^Pnp. "
Imported *nd|Dorne?tic
LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT 1
Phone 3-3-5 J uneau ? ?
I I 1 I 1 I I I I 1 I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 1 I I I
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
Stationery Store
Dealer in all kinds of station
ery. office supplies, typewriter
supplies.
Agent for the
L. C. Smith & Bro. Type
writer
;
? <?
I P. Wolland |
I Tailor I
? X
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O 0
X Phone 6? SECOND ST. < ?
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??????????????????????????
Berry's Store
Rain Coats Children's Coats
Ladies Pine Muslin UNDERWEAR
1111111111111111 ii 111111 M
:: The .Alaska Grill 11
!! The Befl Appointed
.. PI*ce in Town
;; Best of Everything Served !!
! at Moderate Prices ;;
i 1111111111 ii 111 * 1111111 ii
?
t THE BEST LOAF OF
I BREAD ?
I Is Sold At i
t San Francisco Bakery ?
? G. MESSERSCHMIDT. Prop. }
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK, Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
I ?
IDITAROD STARTS ROW
BETWEEN MAIL ROUTES
Postmaster T. L. Thurston is ex-1
perimenting with a view to securing j
government action in having Iditarod,
Innoko and Seward peninsula mails
routed via Seward next winter, if pos
sible.
The test is being made in the fol
lowing manner: Duplicate letters
dealing with the proposed change
have been sent to the postmaster
general and to Delegate Wickersham.
Of these one set was forwarded by
the regular mail route, while the du
plicates were given into the care of
H. H. Porter, who left for the Out
side over the Seward trail last Satur
day morning. .Mr. Porter will post
the letters when he reaches Seattle.
?Iditarod Pioneer.
WILD HORSES ROAM
IN B. C. VALLEYS
I
Three thousand or more wild horsi-e
in herds from 30 to 100 are roaming
over the hills and valleys in the in
terior of British Columbia, according
to a report by James Bradley, who,
with Gustav Reiland. a veteran pros
pector and miner known throughout
the bonanza gold camps, has just re
turned from an extended exploration
tour of the coast, says the Prince Ru
pert Empire.
"Indians and white prospectors and
pack train freighters value these
animals more than high-bred horses,"
said Mr. Bradley. "They are the pro
geny of horses turned loose on the
trail by discouraged or dying men dur
ing the famous gold rush in the Car
ibou country. Thousands of the ver
iest ?tenderfeet' stampeded to the new
fields in the early 60's. Many of them
were incompetent, and, in fact, utter
ly helpless in that wild country, and
the horses either broke away or were
abandoned when the fortune-hunter
gave up on the long trail.
"The horses made their feeding
grounds in the vicinity of Barkerville
for several years afterward, and their
offspring wandered northward as the
bands increased. They are wild and
make trails on the mountains and tim
bered country much after the fashion
: of buffalo in the learly days, and deer
! at present.
"The Indians and freighters, work
ing in the timbered districts, catch
them with snares, such as are used for
, lynx. In most cases the animals are
easily broken and they are better for
the rought country than higbgrade
horses, on account of their stamina
and sureness of foot on the mountain
! trails. We lost horses from our train
j from time to time, and replaced them
j with wild animals."
HELEN S. CLAIM IS
SHIPPING GOLD ORE
FAIRBANKS, April 2.?According to
Rex \V. Ford, who is in the city from
Fairbanks creek. Crites & Feldinan,
the owners of, and operators on the
rich lead on the Helen S. claim, com
menced to ship ore yesterday morning
to the Willis mill on Chatham. The
Helen S. claim lies between Moose
gulch and Too Much Gold creek, on
the left limit of Fairbanks creek.
Crites & Feldinan have been driv
ing a tunnel on their ledge this win
ter. and are now in to the hill for a
distance of 280 feet. They have been
running in very rich ore all the way
and think that their mill run will show
thinks that it may go even as high
values of $100 to the ton. Mr. Ford
as $150 to the ton.
LANDLOCK BAY WILL
RESUME OPERATION
SEATTLE. April 19. ? Because he
believes the present administration
is going to deal liberally with Alaska,
and that within a very short time the
resources of that territory will be open
to development. John L. Steele, a pio
neer Alaskan and president of the
Standard Copper Mines Co., which has
its mines at Landlock. Alaska, an
nounced yesterday that his company's
mines will be again in active opera
tion about June 1.
He expects to begin shipping ore,
which will be sent to the smelter at
Tacoma, Aug. 1. Twenty men will be
employed and 1,000 tons of highgrade
ore will be sent south each month.
When the coal lands of Alaska
again are opened for development,
Steele says his company will Install a
large matting plant. At the present
time, coke, which has to be brought
to Alaska, is too expensive to use, and
it will not be profitable to operate a
matting plant on his company's prop
erty until the Alaska coal, which is
suitable for the purpose, is released
I by the government.
WHEN YOU want to eat well, go
to the Commercial Cafe Dining Room,
Lunch Counter, Private Boxes. The
| choicest viands at lowest prices. For
reservations for private parties, phone
! 281. 3-B Lf.
Relation With the Police.
"How often have been arrested?"
' asked the Judge.
"Oh, lots of times," replied the
pretty offender. "You see, I used to
be in better circumstances and ran
my own car."
GLEANINGS FROM GREAT I
NORTHERN EMPIRE
That the ground in the Bonuilield
section is being reBtaked by men who
are willing to work and that pros
pectors are starting to dig with re
newed interest there, is the report
brought to Fairbanks by William
Lloyd, the game warden, who reached
that town from a trip of inspection
over the trail to Bonnltield creek.
+ < * *
Dirt running fifty cents to the pan
has been discovered on Eva creek In
the Tanana Valley. The pay dirt is
coming from the tunuel 25 feet from
the shaft, and is getting richer the
farther they drive the tunnel*. Eight
een inches in the bedrock the dirt pays
12 cents to the pan.
* * ?
A dozen outfits are taking good
pay out of Little Eldorado creek in
the Fairbanks district according to
reports from Fairbanks.
* * *
The Dan McCarty cabin at Little
Delta on the Fairbanks-Valdez trail
was burned early this winter. The oc
cupants of the cabin were unable to'
save any of Its contents. The loss
was $2,000, of which $500 was in cur
rency and $100 in furs.
* * *
On April 7th it was said at Fair
banks that the staking of claims on
Twenty-mile creek In the Salcha coun
try was still in progress. The staking
was the result of the strike already re
ported on that creek by Pearson, which
was reported in these columns.
* * *
Smallwood creek in the Fairbanks
district is being worked this year by
a half-dozen or more outfits. Some
of them are taking out pay dirt ac
cording to the Fairbanks Times.
* * *
James H. Russell, of Fairbanks,
formerly a pioneer of the Atlin coun
try and afterward an operator in the
Dawson district, and Mrs. Russell
have just become the parents of their
twelfth child. Eleven of the even
dozen are alive and well. Seven of
them were born in the North.
? * *
The linotype operator on the Skag
way Alaskan is a lady, and recently
she celebrated her eighteenth birth
day. The staff of the paper decided
that the occasion should be celebrat
ed. so they all brought candy to the
office for the girl that presides over
the machine. The Alaskan says "can
dy was selected as a token of remem
brance to Miss Bernlce, because of
its sweetness, it being emblematic of
her temperament and habits."
GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP
OR PRIVATE MONOPOLY
Various measures looking to the
government construction of ruilroads
in Alaska will be urged upon Congress
in the present and the next session.
There is general belief, moreover, that
the policy will be adopted, and Alas
kan development started on a basis
utterly different from that of the oth
er parts of the public domain.
It has been made reasonably appar
ent that if the Government does not
provide transportation in Alaska, it
cannot prevent the substantial monop
olization of the resources of the coun
try. Transportation there is the in
strument of control to an extent un
paralleled in any other part of the
country. Therefore Government mo
nopoly of transportation is the only
assurance against monopoly of the
chief resources.
A program of Government railroad
ownership in Alaska would presuma
bly begin with the acquisition of pres
ent lines there. That is all right, if
it is all right; not otherwise. The new
policy must not open the way to un
loading a lot of dogs and cats on the
Government at unreasonable prices.
Some of the figures that have been
given on cost of Alaskan railroads have
strongly suggested such a plan.?Wash
ington Times.
ANIMAL HOSPITAL FOR
WASHINGTON CITY
WASHINGTON, April 26.?A hospi
tal in Washington for the treatment
of sick horses, dogs, cats, and all oth
er domestic animals, is being planned
by the leaders in the Washington Cat
Club, an organization which has here
tofore been interested only in breeding
thoroughbred cats'. Animals belong
ing to people of means will be treated
in the institution at a fixed price, and
those belonging to people unable to
pay will be treated free.
Credulity
"You say he is credulous?"
"Very. He honestly thinks he can
judge a summer resort by the picture
on the post card."
Oyster-lovers, go to "U and I"
Lunch Room. 4-14-lm.
HUNTERS AND TRAPPERS:?
Highest cash price paid for all kinds
of raw furs at Will's store. 4-7-tf.
IIIIM1IIII llllll II III I I I j
j | A. Benson J bSL!!
Stand at Wills' Grocery Store ' 1
Phone 4*9 ' 1
? ? ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED ? '
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FAIRBANKS RECEIVER
AFTER MONEY
fter considering the petition of Re
ceiver F. G. Noyes, of the Washington
Alaska hank, to Judge Fuller, asking
for permission to make a demand on
R. C. Wood for the return of the sum
of $1:1,000, the court signed an order
yesterday authorizing the receiver of
the defunct Washington-Alaska hank
to make the demand through his at
torney and institute suit in the dis
trict court if deemed necessary. ; .
The petition recites that E. T. Bar- .
nette, J. W. Hill and R. C. Wood orig-1;
inally formed the co-partnership ?
known as the Fairbanks Banking Corn- ?
pany, which was later absorbed by !
the Washington-Alaska bank. The. lat- \
ter institution, the petition says, is N
now in a Btate of insolvency, and lias '
been so for a period of over two years. ?
The assets of the institution at this !
time are insufficient to pay the debts [
by the sum of about $200,000.
The peition recites that on June !
JO, 1908, the certificate of R. C. Wood '
in the banking company was cancelled '
the certificate of deposit issued to him .
in the sum of $1:1,000. The number of
shares held by Mr. Wood was 130.
This sum, the receiver goes on to
say in the petition, has all been drawn
out. Permission is asked of the court
to demand that R. ('. Wood return the
$13,000, which, the petitioner claims,
belongs to the hanking company's suc
cessors.
The petition and order were drawn
up by O. L. Rider, the new attorney
for the receiver, and represent the
first steps taken by him to bring an;
end to the receivership.
I
The Dally Empire delivered In Jn- i
neau, Douglas and Treadwell for $1.00 ;
a month.
I
Forced out of business by owner of
building. Sale to run only 10 more
days. tf.
J. J. SHARRICK.
Robt. Simpson, Opt. D.
GLASSES FITTED
i Rale* Reasonable
Office temporarily with Dr. Hnrrixon
Over Raymond Company
I I I III 111 ITT !? l'Ti 1 111 I I III];
Juneau Electrical ;;
:: Supply House ::
Wiring and Repairing ??
a Specialty.
?? Telephone 3-7-3 SECOND STREET ??
? ? P. O. Box 1K3 Bet. Main & Seward ? ?
J- E. CHOVIN
ill II M 111 1 111 III I I 11 III 1 I1"*
i|'l 1 11 1 I 1 I 1 I 1
|i: Golden Belt Addition !i
Choice Residence Lots for Sale ])
- ? Sec E. L. COBB. Apt. - Phone 3-C-9 ? ?
?H-M-M-l-M 1 I I 1 1 1 ?I-I--111 I 1 I-l-i
!;l'i i i 1 i i i 1 i i i i ii i i i i m i 1 i h
|j The 'Model' J
This Is a
:: ::
RESTAURANT ?
:: ::|
;; Fred Vinton Tom McMullen
?1-1 1 i i i h-i i 1 1 1-1 m i-m i i h-i-h
I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I
:: A.W.RHODES -
:; stock wall paper::
I ' All Kinds interior Finish. Houw Palming 11
, , Phone 3-7-3 Second Street . ,
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I If
Tire-Proof Buildings
Cheap as Wooden Structures
Plans and specifications for
reinforced concrete buildings
and piles, and cement houses,
prepared by
C. K. FORNER, Engineer,
Juneau, Alaska
I
little
TSantJ
Will
/ V BSOLUTELY Self-Con
taincd; ready to operate
on arrival;
^ Coil rratonablo; ejjtcirnl and
I durablo; rmilv shipped to
?r rcmotr pointt; nrrdt no
tpocial foundation.
One patron write*: "Wo nre uslnjr
n ft.Vme*h *ereen and mllllm; an
averace of 16 Ion* of ore i>er "1-hour
day with, each mill. Considering
linr*o|iowor eonHUtned I.ITTI.K OIANT
STAMP MIM.S are moat rapid crush
er* ever *een: prefer them to any
i other stamp mill on market."
i Information obtainable by nddrea*
lnjc or enlllnir on
Seattle Construction & Drydock Company
' K
? Dept.. Soattle, U. S. A.
HEIDELBERG LIQUOR Co
"House of Good Drinks"
BEST APPOINTED PLACE IN TOWN
Carries nothing but the finest quality of goods. Family
Trade Solicited
Telephone 386?QUICK DELIVERY
I-.I- I I I"! ! H I H-I-M-M-l 11111M1I M MI1I1 IH-t
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
| Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan
I COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
1 FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU. ALASKA I!
hi 1 1 11 11 1 ?!?
H-M-l I"I"1"1"H~H T,,li,l 'I' 1 ?1"Iii1iiH~Hi 1 '1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 I I 1 1 ?
[ THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL j;
I MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop. ;;
f HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN::
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED ::
T THIRD STREET JUNEAU, ALASKA ;;;
?t-I.-I-I-l-l-l.-l- I-l-I-l-l-r -1 1111111 1 ?! 'LI, !? I- M-H"!"!"!1! ?! ?! M M M 1 M-i M l
| OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc.
J Tho?. H. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Kays, Scc.-Treas. X
j COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS ?
I Finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke ?
A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN 1
?JT ? Cleaned and Blocked
iicltS JUNEAU
CLEANING AND DYE WORKS
SECOND STREET. BETWEEN SEWARD AND FRANKLIN STREETS
B.M.BEHRENDS, BANKER
JUNEAU, ALASKA
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
Established 1887
Intereit Paid on Member
Savings Accounts American Bankers' A'ssn.
i????nrm?rnmTTT??nrmfirrf"wi?i
I I II I I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I I I I I ? I I 1 H I I M I H I 1 I I I I I >
;! WHEN YOU NEED ||
j; Furniture, Mattresses, Stoves, Ranges:!
Cooking* Utensils or Crockery ::
and vou want full value for your money .vfo to ||
:: JOHN P. BENSON, the Furniture Dealer::
Cor. Third and Seward Streets, Juneau ?>
II Tons upon tons of new and up-to-date goods arrive at our store every week ? ?
I I I I I I I 8 II 1 t I I I II II I 111 I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ! I i I ) II I II I 1 +
?II 1 11 'I
I House Cleaning
I Window Washing
Phone
2-0-8
Juneau Cleaning
and i*
Dyeing Works
I -I I I I I I I i 1 1 1 I
j/^%i~\uerica's Finest Flouring Mills"
Plant and Product
one and inseparable
f / Pronounced by experts "America's finest flouring
Y Mills," the plant of the Fisher Flouring Mills
7 Company, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Every grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It in no idle boast to say that thi*
product is the cleanest, most scien
tifically Mended, most economical
floor offered for sale today. Combin
ing as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of both hard and soft wheat flours
is Itctfer than either, and decidedly
suj>crior to any other blend hcreto
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Fisher's BLEND
^ FLOUR
Call At
"HOME BAKERY"
For Home-Made Pics, Cakes and
Bread.
F. F. Graff?Propr.
SECOND ST.?Opp. Customs House
?i 1111111111111111111111 i n
;; The Unique Millinery j;
Easter Goods
i! Upstairs, Cor. Second and Main !!
! 1 I I ! 1 1 I I I 1 ! I I 1 I 1 1 1 I I I 1 1 I

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