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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 01, 1913, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-05-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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: JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. j
J We have for the table the ?
I CRESTA BIANCA AND EL DORADO WINES |
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH
I Tel. 9-1 RYE AND BOURBON 'ront St. ^
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
(las Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine anil Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr. j
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads. F:sh and 3irds ?
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
+ ?
?Juneau Transfer Co. ?
: coal wood ?
storage |
X Moving Carefully Done ?
X Baujfajce Our Long Suit ?
X ? I
? FRONT STREET
+ Next door to Raymond Co. ^
? E. D. Watkins ?
J EXPERT BLACKSMITH ?
t and IRON WORKER X
? ?
? General Blacksmithing. Horse- +
X Shoeing. Iron and Marine Work X
X Kstimates Furnished and ?
? Work Guaranteed ?
? FRANKLIN STREET ?
X Union Iron Works Building j
? ?
? ?
? ?
{McCloskeys i
? ? *
? ?
j :
? ?
: :
? ?
-r-i-r-: i i i i i i i i i i i I 11 i m-h
I he Louvre Bar ::
7 Al Carlson. Prop. 7H
|| Imported anilJI>omestic
:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
" RAINIKK BEEK ON DRAUGHT "
Phone 3-3-5 Juneau ..
? -'??! i i ; i i 11 i i i 11 111 111 11111
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
Stationery Store
Dealer in all kinds of station
try. office supplies, typewriter
supplies.
Agent for the
L. C. Smith & Bro. Type
writer
J,
?????????????AAAAAAAAAAAAA
J ? W V?? W WVf WW WT W f W W
I F. Wolland I
? J
1 Tailor |
I :
X Phone t*> SECOND ST. *
I j
Berry's Store
Rain Coats Children's Coats
Ladies Fine Muslin UNDERWEAR
-M II11 I I I II II H II I 1 I II I I I I
j| The Alaska Grill jj
1 he Best Appointed
.. Place in Town
;; Best of Everything Served !!
at .Moderate Prices ;;
i111111M tim 11 i it i n i i 11 >
??????????????????????????
+ THE BEST LOAF OF *
: BREAD
| Is Sold At ?
? San Francisco Bakery f
? G. MESSEKSCHMIDT, Prop. X
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS. Cashier
DIRECTORS
F W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
WHAT BIG MILLIONAIRES WFLL HAVE TO PAY
IN INCOME TAX ON FOUR PER CENT BASIS
The big millionaires of the country would be hit by the income tax,
on a four per cent basis, about as follows, the incomes themselves being
estimated at 5 percent of the owner's capital, with the exception of J. D.
Rockefeller and William Rockefeller, each 10 per cent, and the J. I'. Mor
I Kan estate, 10 per cent:
Tav
John D. Rockefeeller
Andrew Carnegie
William Rockefeller
Estate of Marshal Field
George F. Baker
Henry Phipps
Henry C. Frick
William A. Clark
Estate of J. P. Morgan
Estate of E. H. Harriman
Estate of Russell Sage
W. K. Vanderbilt
Estate of John S. Kennedy
Estate of John J. Astor
W. W. Astor
J. J. Hill
Isaac Stephenson
Jay Gould estate
Mrs. Hetty Green
Estate of Cornelius Vanderbilt
Estate of William Weightman
! Estate of Ogden Goelet
W. H. Moore
Arthur C. James
Estate of Robert Goelet
Guggenheim estate
Thomas F. Ryan
Edward Morris
I J. O. Armour
Capital
$500,000,000
300,000,000
200.000.000
120,000,000
100.000.0tt0
100,000,000
10W00.000
80,000,000
75,000,000
68,000,000
64.000,000
50,000,000
65.000,000
70,000,000
70,000,000
70.000,000
74,000,000
70.000,000
60,000,000
50,000.000
50,000.000
. 60,000,000
50,000,000
50,000,000
60,000,000
50,000,000
50.000.000
45,000,000
45,000,000
IIIUUIIIU
$50,000,000 !
15,000,000
20,000,000
6,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
4,000,000
7,500,000
3,400,000
3.200,000
2,500,000
3,250.000
3,500.000
3,600,000
3.500,000
3.700,000
3,500,000
3,000.000
2,500,000
2,500,000
3,000,000
2,500,000
2.500.000
3.000.000
2,500,000
2,500.000
2,250,000
2.250.000
f2.000.000
600,000
800.000
240,000
200,000
200,000
200.000
160,000
300,000
146,000
128,000
100,000
130,000
140,000
140,000
140.000
148,000
140,000
120,000
100,000
100,000
120.00C
100,000
100,000
120,000
100,000
100,000
90.000
90,000
The name of Frederick Weyerhauser, of St. Paul, the "lumber kins,"
does not appear in the above list. He is regarded as one of the wealthiest
men in the country. Te owns, it is said, 60,000 square miles of standing
trees, and it has often been stated in print that he is "richer than Rocke
j fellers." *
In the $25,000,000 to $25,000,000 class, yielding incomes of $1,250,000 to
$1,750,000 and taxes of $50,000 to $70,000. are James Stlllman, J. H. Schift",
Sharles M. Pratt, J. H. Flagler, Quincy A. Shaw, E. T. Bedford, E. T.
Stotesbury, John (Matin, Henry Walters. E. C. Converse, Clarence H. Mackay,
Nathaniel Thayer, W. H. Moore, and the estates of II. II. Rogers. Robert
Winsor. George Smith. W. B. Leeds, W. Scully, John Arbuckle, J. Crosby
Brown. John F. Dryden, W. L. Elkins and O. H. Payne.
!
Bayne in Race
for Blonde Eskimos
"
To discover the remains and recordsl
of Sir John Fraklin and at the same j
time to beat Vilhjalmar Stefansson in
a race to Victoria Land, the habitat
i of the blond Eskimos. Capt. Peter
Bayne, Civil War veteran, miner, ex
plorer and whaler, known far and
wide in the Northland as "Old Cap,"
will sail from Seattle early In June
in the little schooner Duxbury, a ves
sel well known for its work in the
Arctic
Stefansson's representatives are
now outfitting the old whaling schoon
er Karluck at Vancouver. His ship:
will fly the Canadian llag, as $75,000
of the money necessary was subscribed
by the Canadian government. The Na
j tional Geographical Society will have
an expedition in the Arctic next sum
I
mer, headed by Captain Bartlett, who
accompanied Peary on many of his
Northern expeditions in search of the
North Pole.
Roald Amundsen, discoverer of-the
South Pole, will enter the Arctic next
year in search of an unknown conti
nent in Beaufort Sea. He will be in
command of the Fram, the celebrated
Norwegian ship, which accomplished
the Farthest North and the Farthest
South.
Capt. Louis Lane sailed a few '
weeks ago for the Arctic with a party
I of scientists. His plans contemplate j
a trip along the coast of Siberia and
' a possible dash to the land of the;
blond Eskimo with a moving picture!
i machine.
I
? ...Ill I. ~ O numhop nf
AlthOUgn mere wm uc ?. uuiuw
expeditions in the Arctic this sum
mer, several traders already being in
readiness to make a dash from Nome
in the hope of finding good business
among the newlv-discovered natives.
Captain Bayne is not backed by any 1
of the scientific societies but is mak
ing the trip on funds subscribed by
friends. He recently concluded nego-j
tiations with Ira M. Rank, a Nome'
trader, for the Duxbury. Power will
be installed in the vessel immediate
ly, and the wood will be sheathed with
Austrian ironbark. one of the few
woods that will resist the scraping
effect of ice on the bow. Bayne will
leave on June 1, which will enable |
him to reach Point Barrow, the north
ernmost promontory of the continent
proper by August 1, before which time
the Arctic is not clear of ice.
:
Reform.
"Do you intend to make a speech fa
voring tariff legislation?"
"No," replied Senator Sorghum; !
"one of the tariff reforms I am advo-l
eating is in the nature of less oratory [
on the subject."
Responsibility .
"Is Briggins a man to be trusted?" i
"In some respects. If he owes you j
j something and says he can't pay you,!
you can place absolute reliance In his!
i -word."
Element of Excitement.
The baseball game arrives anew
And bids us get together.
A lot of its suspense is due
To guessing on the weather.
WHY NOT MAKE
IT UNANIMOUS?
Senator La Follette's injunction to
ilia followers to support every progres
sive action or policy of President Wil
son has the color of a definite move
toward the alignment of forces for the
hattle of 1916. The Wisconsin Senator
would have it appear that "playing
politics" cuts no figure in the matter,
as it is no time for parties to engage
in presidential campaigning, and no
doubt he is sincere in what he says.
Yet four years years ago, when Mr.
I>a Follette was a candidate for the
nomination, he was about the first to
take the field, and that, too, very early
in the Tuft administration.
While his experience may have con
vinced him that a mistake was made
in setting up the pins so soon, an
opinion which is shared by many, it
hardly follows that .Mr. La Follette's
present-day advice to go slow will
have the effect of deterring others
from giving attention to planning and
organizing, and mayhap throwing
their hats in the ring. Moreover, as
Mr. I>a Follete addresses his appeal
not merely to his brand of progres
sives in Congress, but to the rank
and file as well, what response could
the bulk of his following make but to
whoop it up for Woodrow for 1916?
The proposed movement is to take
form at once, according to the call,
but if it is to be understood that the
La Follette progressives are not likely
to have a candidate or a program of
their own, and can take only a think
ing part as regards their alliance with
the Democrats, while the bull moose J
progressives have their irons in the!
? ' - * 11!?
fire, the thing is in danger ui luuuit,
flat. For that matter, the result of
the recent election In Wisconsin dis
closes the fact that the moderate pro
gressives are already disintegrating
and no longer dominate the situation.
President Wilson and Senator La
Follette have much in common as to
giving legislative effect to the pro
gressive program, and the senator
gives evidence of his zeal in his new
task in a rather unique way. He says
no greater opportunity was ever pre
sented for patriotic statesmanship.
The field is open to all the minorities
?Republicans, bull moosers, and pro
gressives?as well as the Democrats.
Why not make support of the Wilson
policies unanimous? ? Washington
Post.
DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT
IS DANGEROUSLY ILL
LONDON, April 29.?The Duchess
of Connaught is dangerously ill, and
not expected to live. She has been
failing for some time, and a short time
ago underwent a serious operation.
The Duchess of Connaught was Prin
cess Louise, of Prussia, daughter of
Prince Frederick Charles, "The Red
Prince," brother of the' late Emperor
William I., and next to Von,Moltke,
Germany's greatest general of the
last generation. She is a cousin of
the present Emperor William. She
married the Duke of Connaught, third
son of the late Queen Victoria and
uncle of the present King of Great
Britain, in 1879.
A complete line of tobacco lars and
pipe racks at BURFORDS.
AMERICANS FORCED [
OUT OF MEXICO
DOUGLAS, Ariz., April 30.?J. S.
Douglas and S. \V. Applewhite, the
American owners of the Cananea Con
solidated Copper Company of Mexico,
who were reported to be held by Mex
ican rebels for a ransom are still in [
this city. They escaped from their
mining property when it was report
ed to them that the Mexican state
officers were going to insist that they
give employment to till the idle labor- ^
ing men in the vicinity of their prop
erty. They bad closed down some of I,
their property, but were supplying all
those that had been thrown out of ?
work on account of their action in pro- .
visions, but claimed that they could [
not give employment to more men. ^
So rather than to take chances on
having to explain or meet a force ?
of rebel troops that were coining to- I
ward their property, they escaped to "
the United States.
Every thing that will please a smok *
er may be found at HURKOHi .
aj
Forced out of business by owner of <
building. Sale to run only 10 more j }
days. tf. ; j
J. J. SHARRICK. i
II
HUNTERS AND TRAPPERS:? <
Highest cash price paid for all kinds {
of raw furs at Will's store. -1-7-tf. j
I <
11 I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I
; A I> Transfer
:: A. Benson & Excess ::j
Stand nt Wills' Grocery Store ' j ?
? > Phones l"9or 8-8-5 , , 4
? ? ORDERS I'ROMPTI.Y EXECUTED ? ? .
I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I It
John MarRRanen
| FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING
Work Guaranteed
Rubber Boots Repaired and Soled
2nd St., bet. Seward and Franklin
Robt. Simpson, OpI.D.
GLASSES FITTED
Ralei RflHiniMr
Ofltce temporarily with Dr. Harrison
Over Raymond Company
{I M"l Mil 1 I I I M-t
:: Juneau Electrical ::
:: Supply House ::
Wiring and Repairing
a Specialty. ?
?? Telephone 3-7-3 SECOND STREET -? ' '
? ? P. O. Kox IS-J Hot. Main & Seward ? ? | .
:: j- e. chovin -
111 I I I I 1 1 I I ! I I I I I i
Golden Belt Addition ;? jj
Choice Residence Lots for Sale * * -j
+ See E. L. COBB. A(rt. - Phone 3-6-9 ? ? J
?I,,l|,I?!iil',I"I"Ii,l"{,,I,,l"l"l,,l"l,,l"l"H~l"!"l I-I- H
j 1 1 1 1 11 Il-H-I-I I H-M-H-Ml 1"H
;i The 'Model' |j
;; This Is a ;; H
RESTAURANT
;; Fred Vinton Tom McMullen ;;
?Ml 1 1 I 1 H 1 1 1 11 i 1-H-l-M-I-H-H
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I M
J A. W. RHODES -
:: ?eck wall paper ::
" ' All Kinds interior Finish. Hou?c Piloting 1 1
, . Phone 3-7-3 Second Street , ,
I I I I I I I I I I I I H I I II I I I I I I ?
Fire-Proof Buildings |
Cheap as Wooden Structures
Plans and specifications for
reinforced concrete buildings
and piles, and cement houses,
prepared by
C. K. FORNER, Engineer,
Juneau, Alaska
I !??'%
?tMnp
Mill
* / V BSOLUTELY Sclf-Con
tained; ready to operate
M?""* on arrival;
Cot I reiuonable; efficient antl
1 durable; riuily thiptted lo
<W remote pointt; neetU no
tpeeial foundation.
One patron Write#: "Wo are ualng
p 85-mcali xoreen and milling nn _
average of 1(1 ton# of ore per 24-hour
tiny with each mill. ConaIde rIn g
horaepower ronatimed I.ITTI.K OIANT
STAMP Mil.US are moat rapid oruah
era ever Been: prefer them to any
other atainp mill on market."
Information obtainable by add rega
ins or railing on
Seattle Construction & Drydock Company
D-rpt.. K Seattle, V. S. A.
HEIDELBERG LIQUOR Co
"House of Good Drinks"
BEST APPOINTED PLACE IN TOWN
Harries nothing but the finest quality of goods. Family
Trade Solicited
Telephone 386?QUICK DELIVERY
H I 11 1 '1 'I ?! I I I 1 1 H +
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan T
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME ?
FRONT ST. JOHN I' OLDS. .Mllgr. JUNEAU, ALASKA
THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL }
MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop.
HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN 1
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED
THIRD STREET JUNEAU, ALASKAT
!? '-M'TTT I II I 1 I I I I 1 II I 1 I I I 1 H~
OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. I
Tlios. II. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Hays, Sec.-Trcas. J
? ?
COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS ?
:
? *
? finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke *
? f
t A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN >
? ~ ?????? -J
JL Cleaned and Blocked i
IiIILS JUNEAU
CLEANING AND dye WORKS
SECOND STREET, BETWEEN SEWARD AND FRANKLIN STREETS j
B.M.BEHRENDS, BANKER
JUNEAU, ALASKA
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
Established 18S7
Interest Raid on Member
Savings Accounts American Bankers' A'ssn.
????MIJWII,? I I IIIM ?
H I II i 1 I { 1 1 t-M-H-:?{ i i t I <WI I i ? ? ? i II I I I I M I I I I I I I I I >4-4
j WHEN YOU NEED ;;
! furniture, Mattresses, Stoves, Ranges!!
Cooking* Utensils or Crockery ::
and vou want full value for your money go to
:JOHN P. BENSON, the Furniture Dealer::
| Cor. Third and Seward Streets, Juneau
; Tons upon tons of new and up-to-date goods arrive at our store ever} week ?>
'mill M-R+-W-W-C H+W-H ! I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I H : -f
j house Cleaning Phone Juneau c'eaning j
j Window Washing ^ ^ ^ Dyeing Works |
"America's Finest Flouring Mills"
Plant and Product
Ay one and inseparable
y /Pronounced by experts "America's Finest Flouring
/ Mills," the plant of the Fisher Flouring Mills
/ Company, was designed and constructed to produce
' America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. livery grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It l* no line ooasi to say niai iui?
product is the cleanest, most scien
tifically blended, most economical
flour offered for sale today. Comliin
ins as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of both hard and soft wheat flours,
is lx-tter than cither, and decidedly
superior to any other blend hereto
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Fisher's BLEND
?2, FL0UR
Call At
"HOME BAKERY"
For Home-Made Pies, Cakes r.tid
Bread.
F. F. Graff?Propr.
SECOND ST.?Opp. Customs House
11 iM in 111 in ii i ii u n i h
f The Unique Millinery |
Easter Goods t
i! Upstairs, Cor. Second and Main 2
H I II III I 111 1 I III 1 111 1 1 I \+

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