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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 13, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the postofllce at Ju
ueau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Q?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1-00
A DUTY FOR ALASKA DEMOCRATS
IN THIS day, when the people of Alaska are being recognized
as the arbiters of their own destiny and when the Democratic
party is in control of the affairs of the Nation, more than usual
responsibilities fall upon those citizens of this territory who are
members of the dominant political party. Theirs is the responsi
bility to keep the public welfare constantly uppermost in mind,
and to eschew unseemly bickering and contention. They should
not forget that while ihe welfare of all the people of the North is
dependent in a large measure upon the character of the govern
ment we have, that most of them are not here for purpose of
engaging in the game of politics. In a measure, for yet partisan
politics enter largely into our national affairs, the Democrats of
- Alaska have the keeping of the welfare of the Territory in their
hands, and the weight of their obligation is made far great
er by the fact that all the citizens are not Democrats.
They are, in a degree, acting as their brothers' keepers
in the North, and they cannot afford to be unfaithful to their trus
teeship.
- - ? ? i ? *. 'I.: 4.^
The Democrats ot Alaska nave more important uhuks iu uu
than to permit rivalry for otlice to degenerate into quarrels, or
to nurse factional differences. These would destroy their useful
ness to Alaska, and deprive them of all chance to serve the peo
ple of the Territory as it is their duty to serve them.
Commenting upon this phase of the political situation in the
North, the Fairbanks Times very pertinently says:
"Yesterday marked an epoch in the history of the
Northland. The appointment of Major Strong as gov
ernor of Alaska and Charles E. Davidson as surveyor
general removes all doubt as to the attitude of the Pres
ident toward the long-neglected Territory. He has demon
strated in no uncertain manner that it is his desire that
Alaskans shall have the opportunity to govern themselves
during his administration, and henceforth it will rest
largely with the people themselves whether or not the af
fairs of the Territory are administered satisfactorily. We
have asked for the privilege of occupying our own offices,
and our hopes are near to realization. The principal of
ficers of the Territory have been named, and it is reason
able to assume that the appointment of other Alaskans
will follow in their order, provided the names of worthy
citizens are put forward and the noise of factional strife
does not frighten the President from his good resolve.
"The Democrats of the Territory are. for the time
being, the custodians of the public welfare, and as such
they should avoid carefully the pitfall which brought
about the demoralization of their predecessors in au
thority. They should be willing to put aside their own
little differences for the greater glory of rendering the
Territory a real service. They should realize that the
time is past for quarreling among themselves. They
should do as Bryan and ('lark did?forget the past for
the sake of the future. If they will do that, they will
make for a greater Democracy in the Territory, and the
President will have no ocasion to depart from a policy
which is so full of promise for Alaska."
President Wilson agrees with Gov. Johnson that the Califor
nia anti-alien legislation does not violate our treaty with Japan,
though he feels that in matters that concern aliens' ends sought
to be attained should be got through the regular chan
nels provided for the consideration of international matters. He
is a great State's right man at that.
HONORING CARL SCHURZ
yurhan they unveiled a statue monument in New York yesterday
W in memory of Carl Schurz they honored one of the great
characters in the history of the Nation. This German, who
was forced to leave his native land because of his advanced polit
ical and social views, did good service for his adopted land. As
an enemy of human slavery, as a member of Congress, as a United
States Senator, as a Cabinet olticer he acted his parts faithfully,
as he did as a citizen of three States?Wisconsin, Missouri and
New York. His activities found expression in both of the major
political parties. He started as a Democrat, became a Republican
on the slavery question, became a Democrat again when Cleveland
came to the front as a leader in the battle against machine poli
tics, went back to the Repubican party when the Democrats com
mitted themselves to the free coinage of silver, and again became
a Democrat when imperialism ;ook place as the paramount issue.
He was an independent thinker, and, though always a partisan for
his convicitions, no political party was anything but a means to
an end with him. He chose always to affiliate with the political
party that lead where he was going. Consequently, while he be
gan life as a Democrat and ended in the same party, most of his
active service was as a Republican. Schurz' historical and polit
ical writings will live as long as there are students of American
history and American politics.
The House of Representatives has earned its three days'
rest. We will consent to have the Senate rest with it if it will
get that tariff bill and the Alaska legislation out of the way, and
we would be pleased to have the resting begin with the earliest
possible moment.
A MATTER OF VIEWPOINT
Come to think of it those across
the-pond commentators who think Mr.
and Mrs. Bryan are narrow and prov
incial because they don't serve wine
at diplomatic dinners, are possibly
themselves the provincials. Are we
to assume that in the Saiut James
view, to serve or not to serve wine
makes the difference between broad
ness and narrowness, between cos
mopolitanism and provincialism?
Isn't it possible that Mr. Bryan
might retort?might, that is, if his
manners were no better than those of
his critics?that he aspired to a liber
alism and cosmopolitanism rather
wider than the rim of a champagne
glass??Washington Times.
Empty Assumptions.
"That man says he has the politi
cal situation in the hollow of his
hand."
"He's mixed." replied Senator Sor
ghum. "He should have said the hol
low of his head."
SOUTHERN YUKON
IS NOT PLEASED
The members of the Yukon council
for Southern Yukon, Messrs. Phelps
and Martin., were given a lesson at
the late session of that body at Daw
son which will cause them to shud
der every time they hear the word
"Minority" during the balance of their
lives. Their lesson was this:
In the budget originally handed
down by Commissioner Black no ap
propriations was made for a road
from Kluane to the head of White riv
er?a route traveled over by a score
of heavily laden freight teams the past
two months, which traveling was
frought with great hardships owing to
the unimproved condition of the trail
between the two points mentioned.
Captain Martin being the first of the
members for Southern Yukon to reach
! Dawson, at once got busy on the
budget, shaving a little there and trim
i tiling a little here, until the sum of
five thousaud dollars had been saved
i and trimmed from the other approp
riations for Southern Yukon, which
amount our two members confidently J
; hoped to have appropriated for the,
, trail above mentioned. And right hero
' is where our members realized the
hopeless insignificance of a minority.!
When a bill was introduced to ap- i
propriate to improving the Kluane
White River trail the five thousand
dollars transferred from other south-i
ern Yukon allowances the six mem
bers for northern Yukon awoke to the
l
fact that, having the numeral strength j
they might just as well have that five
thousand dollars expended in their
own domain, and this they proceeded
to do by substituting the words "Cof
fee Creek" for "Kluane", and divert
ing the fund worked up by the mem
! bers for Southern Yukon to that route
making the trail to White river start
from the mouth of Coffee creek on
the Yukon river, 250 miles below
Whitehorse instead of from Kluane
lake, to which point there is a good
| road from Whitehorse.
When our members realized what
was being done they remonstrated
most vigorously, but to no avail. They
even made strenuous efforts to retain j
half the amount, $2,500, for the Klu-,
ane route, but were unable to do any
thing against the other six members
of the board, two being a hopeless mi
nority as compared with the former
number.
This explains why the route over
which more than fifty tons of supplies
were freighted from Whitehorse to
the head of White river this spring at
great expense and hardship is left
without one dollar of public money j
to better its condition?Whitehorse
Star.
CORDOVA PAPER AGREES
WITH WICKERSHAM
Delegate Wickersham and many
others declare that under existing laws
the resources of Alaska can be satis
factorily developed, if an opportunity
is only given the people so to. do.
Former Secretary of the Inferior Fish
er insists that such a thing is impos
sible under existing laws. But we
don't believe many people of Alaska
will side with Mr. Fisher. They lost
faith in him many moons ago.?Cor
do Alaskan.
TO JUNEAU PATRONS:
1 wish to announce that I am pr* <?
pared to give prompt and efficient o
service in delivering, coal hauling
freight, baggage, etc. <'
HILARY McKANNA TRANSFER <>
Phone Order 6-7 or 56 tf o
Clam chowder every day at "U and **
I" Lunch Room. 4-14-lm. < ?
LONG ON CONCEALED WEAPONS;!
Some of those German gun munu-!
facturers are suspected of employing1
concealed weapons more dangerous
than firearms.?Washington Star.
Unintentional Suggestion.
"Worrying again?"
"Yes. So many people are telling
me not to worry that I can't help
thinking about my troubles."
A complete line of iobacco Jars and ]
pipe racks at BURFORDS.
SCANDINAVIAN GROCERY?Opp.
City dock; Just opened; fresh stock.
FEMMER & RITTER
See this firm for all kinds of dray
lug aud hauling. We guarantee sat
isfaction and reasonable prices. Coai
delivered promptly. Femmer & Rit
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones
402 or 403. ???
iln the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with
the proper vouchors and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at !
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator.,
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L, A. Moore, Berta Jarmy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec- t
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat- ]
utes and the amendments thereto ap- (
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims, 1
upon the Sum Duin group of placer :
claims and upon the Duck creek group ?
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70, j
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid,
by Fred Stevensor., holding one-eighth i
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, anc( the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofiice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
I I I II III I I I I ; i I It I M !?! 11
Are your eyes weak or over- ??
I! worked? Are your present I!
glasses satisfactory? The re- ||
?? lief of eyestrain by accurately ??
? ? fitted lenses is followed fre- ??
II quently by the general tone im- II
|| provement of other ailing or- ||
?? gans. I can positively give you ??
.. the best optical service north I.
|| of 53, and as good as the best, ||
?? south.
Consultation Free
II Broken Lenses Replaced II
|| Satisfaction Guaranteed ||
:: Robert Simpson, ij!
Opt. D. |
:: SPECIALIST IN REFRACTION ::
II Home Address, Juneau Alaska, ||
|| with Dr. Harrison, dentist, ||
Over Raymond Co.
Tl I I 1 I II 1 Ml 1 I M Id 11 IM I it 1^
? I I I I I I I H I I I I 1 I I 1
t r
||; HaveOnly
:: Ten Days
Greater
Reductions
Than Ever.
Til 111II l M I I I I I I I
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I II I M I I I I I I I I I
Forced Out of Business i;
By owner of Building. Had no lease. Must
Move in Thirtv days and have no house to ] j
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;;
ware, Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;
^ IJ.SH^JSK!!
Painted China and OPTICIAN < ?
II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ? I I I D I I I I I II I
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
R. A. GUNNISON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska ,1
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE j
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau ? ? Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
J. F. EVERETT
ARCHITECT
?127 Walker Huilding, Seattle
205 Seward St. JUNEAU
W. H. CbKVKUAND P. J. Ct.KVEl.AND
Contractors-Builders
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts?. j
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 ;n,
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 jm**
?PHONE?209
? J
WHEN YOU want to well, go
o the Commercial Cafp fining Room, i
Lunch Counter, PrlYftffc Boxes. The
jhoicest viands at lowest prices. For
?eservations for ip'.yate parties, phone
181. 3-6-Lf.
' *
JUM?AU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Ex
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, Gypsum, i
Tenakee, Killisnoo, Chatham and
Sitka S:00 a. m. April 4, 10, 16,
22, 28; May 4, 10. 16, 22, 28.;
June 3, 9, 15, 21, 27; July 3, 9,
15, 21, 27; August 2, 8, 14. 20.
26; September 1, 7, 13, 19.
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skajfway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River. Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2. 8, 14, 20, 26; June 1. 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13. 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12, 18, 24, 30; September
5. 11. 17. 23. and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
______________
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. i
|
Tho Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT TT <? Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND MAY 12
SOUTHBOUND MAY 13
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ollice, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD. Agent
** _i
?f-H-i 'i-i i m 11 i-r-1111111111111111111111111111 n 1111111111
? ALASKA I
:: \ STEAMSHIP COMPANY T
? ?- Safety, Service, Speed Ticket* to Seattle, Tncorna. Victoria and Vancouver. Through j
? ticket* to San Francisco
!!. JEFFERSON Northbound MAY 9 Southbound.... MAY 10 |
ALAMEDA Northbound MAY 12 Southbound.... MAY 19 'j
MARIPOSA Southbound MAY 9
NORTHWESTERN Northb'd... MAY 21 Southbound MAY 28 ?
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt.
?H-+ -fr-H-H-1-1- M i M i i | i i | i i i | I ImM.,1 M | I 1 I I I I M I I 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 H-?
? Bi A a I r\ Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office <>?
l INUKI nLAINl/ w,th juneau Transfer c?
T
t i ? n John Henson. Douglas Agent <>;
\ Steamship Company ??
? <"
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU <>?
T
? Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKl, - May 7 - 18 |:
?17 j. C 1.1.I First ^'ass $19.00
t rare to oeattle second ciaSS $12.00 -
i 1111'J 111111111 1111111111111111111111111II111111111111 -
| ALASKA COAST CO. f
Per Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, < ?
I! ? , Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
;; S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON MAY 8
;; s. s? Yukon may 24 ;;
;; SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA \\
;; a. 5. ADMIRAL SAMPSON MAY 17 ??
? ' s,. su yukon may 10 ; ;
? ? >?lghc Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. <.
S. H? 'Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle J '
** 11 ii 11111111 m i r 111111111111" i " ?i " urn i?
t PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. <>
SEATTLE, TACOMA, ]|
?. Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, o
'? South BeJIingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco,
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego.
% C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
T 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle <,
4 S. S. SPOKANE North May 3-14-25?South May 4-15-26
4> CITY OF SEATTLE North May 9-20-31?S. May 10 June 1 o
4^ Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. JJ)
?4M ??
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing fium Aummu for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert. Swunson. Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle j
PRINCESS MAY PJC DOCK MAY 14 j
' Front and Seward Kta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE T. SPICKETT. Ant. j;
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukUim and
Trend well
j *8:00 a. m.
i 9:00 a. ns.
11:00 a. m.
j' . 1:00 p. m.
j 3:00 p m.
{ ' 4:30 p.m.
S j 6:30 p. m.
j 8:00 p.m.
j I 9:00 p.m.
j '.11:00 p.m.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8 : ^r? a. in.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. rn.
3:26 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. in.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. mj
Leaves
DouKlas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a.m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p.m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
5jJL0 p. m.
Krom Juneau ior
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nltrht Only j
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
8heep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:46 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 P- m.
~ i
We Are i Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
N ^ f
%
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
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