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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 17, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postotlice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 6.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
ANOTHER SEASON BEGINS.
THE sailing of the Corwin and the departure of the Bering
sea patrol fleet marks the beginning of another season of ac
tivity in Northern Alaska. In the next five months those
virile men of that section of the Territory will strive with all
their might to concentrate in less than a half year a full year's
accomplishment. Every day will be made to count. Not a mom
ent will be lost. They have been storing up energy and making
plans for the fray during a long winter, and they go forth as war
riors to a battlefield. Before the ides of October shall be with us,
they will have added millions to the gold supply of the world,
and a harvest of furs and curios will have been sent into the
marts of trade in exchange for the sinews with which to make
another furious campaign next year. It is an interesting life,
and they are interesting men that follow it.
One of these days, the problem of winter transportation to
this farther section of Alaska will have been solved. When that
time comes, there will be a whole year in which the development
of the Bering sea and Arctic ocean section can proceed along
orderly lines. Yet it is not likely that the Arctic summer season
will ever lose any of its strenuousness. Certainly it will not
as long as the present generation of Alaskans continues active
there.
Last Thursday for the second time Secretary of Commerce
Redfi'eld announced that the government would investigate any
cut in wages that might be made following the enactment of the
Underwood taritl* bill, and President Wilson ratified the first state
ment made by his Cabinet officer some time ago. Evidently, it is
the intention of the executive department that the bill shall have
a fair trial.
PRESIDENT INSISTS UPON FULFILLMENT.
WHETHER the tariff bill shall proove good or ill President Wil
son has determined that it shall fulfill Democratic promises
and that no man shall have cause to characterize its enact
ment as "party perfidy and dishonor." The demand for free raw
materials and for cheaper necessities must be acceded to, and the
manufacturers must be compelled to get down to a competitive
basis, and depend upon the quality and price of their goods rather
than a cinch on the market to keep their lactories going. Sup
port of these principles is being made the test of Democracy by
the President, and he has announced that it is his purpose
to ascertain whether or not the people have selected a Democrat
ic majority in the United States Senate.
W hile there is objection to the President's course by those
whose profits will be curtailed by the withdrawal of the special
benefits that the high tariff has been bestowing upon them, the
masses of the people are unquestionably upholding the adminis
tration. Even those that have supported high tariff, as a matter
of public policy rather than for selfish purposes, recognize the rec
titude of the President and the justice of his position, and are
hoping that he will succeed in securing a fair trial for the prin
ciples and policies of the Democratic party.
Most of those Senators that seem to be so desirous of master
ing the schedules that they might discover where they stand on
the tariff bill are really trying to discover what their constituents
will do to them at the next election if they vote for or against
the bill.
HALF-HOLIDAYS FOR GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
SECRETARY OF COMMERCE WILLIAM C. REDFIELD'S
movement to have government employees given a Saturday
half-holiday should be successful. It should not be confined
to the employees of the District of Columbia either. It should ex
tend throughout the country. Most of the employers of labor in
office and other sedent* ry occupations are giving employees a
half-day off during the week, and Uncle Sam should not be
less generous than the others. Anything that has a tendency to
make life worth living to those that are doing the drudgery in
the work of the world is worthy of the most careful consideration.
It is not a wonder that Secretary Redfield is receiving congratula
tory letters and telegrams from all sections of the country and
from those in all stations of life.
The Pall Mall Gazette's "Wishy Washington" is almost worth
the rest of the hullabaloo that has risen from the Bryan "grape
juice" dinner.
SULZER BEGINS THE WAR.
GOV. WILLIAM SULZER has laid down the law?Democrats
must support the direct primary bill or not be recognized as
Democrats at the State capital. He declared to the Demo
cratic members of the Legislature and the Democratic county
chairman that he would hold those of them that oppose his pri
mary to be political enem es, and that he would fight them to the
last ditch. He said to them in plain language that he understands
the game of politics, and that he knows New York State. He
told them that all his skill as a politician and all his knowledge of
the people will be utilized to crush those that do not stand for
the keeping of the Democratic pledge for a primary election law.
And next week he takes the stump in the finish fight under the
rules he has laid down.
It is not strange that the democratic Democrats of New York
are well pleased. At last they have a leader, one with the cour
age to attack Murphy and with the skill to whip him. It is the
first time the masses of the State have had such an one since
Tilden. The result of the contest is likely to be a duplication of
that battle in the 70s, when Tweed was driven into retirement,
and Tammany confined to its little island.
If Sulzer, and Roosevelt, and Hearst do not get to quarreling
over who shall work in the lead they will make an effective tandem
team in a campaign anyhow.
M I 1 I I | | | | I I | | | | I |
?| Have Only
:: Ten Days
^ Greater
Reductions
Than Ever.
n111111111 ii 11111
111111111111IIII111II11111111111111
forced Out of Business jj
By owner of Building. Hud no lease. Must ??
Move in Thirty days and have no house to J J
move into. Must sacrifice my stock of !!
Watches, Clocks, Jewelery, Silver- ;;
ware,Cut Glass, Hand Painted China ;;
rr- 11 charick!!
White & Hand I I J JEWELER
Painted China and OPTICIAN ? !
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ? I II I I I I I I I II
ONE NORTHERN WHALING
COMPANY WILL BE IDLE
SEATTLE.?Notified of its infrac
tion of the contract labor laws too
late to make preparations with them
this season, the Alaska Whaling Co.,
which last season operated extensive
ly in northern waters, will this year
be unable to make its usual catch.
Its two steam whalers, the Unimak
and Kodiak, now iu Seattle, will re
main at their docks until time to go
out next season.
Last season the Alaska Whaling
Co. operated the old Norwegian
steam whaler, which was fitted up as
a rendering plant and anchored close
to shore near where the two new
whalers were operating. Late this
spring the company was notified by
the government that in anchoring the
Norwegian vessel in American wa
ters and refining the American pro
duct aboard the vessel they were vio
lating the contract labor law.
The notification came too late in
the season that it was impossible for
the whaling company to make other
arrangements to handle its products,
and as a result the entire plant will J
this year remain idle.
Besides the rendering plant on the j
Admiralen, the company has a for- j
tilizing factory at Akutan. This year
additional machinery will be installed j
and next season both oil and fertiliz
er will be handled from that point,
which will be the main station of the
company.
GOVERNORS CANNOT FILL
SENATORIAL VACANCIES
? s
WASHINGTON, May 17?One of
the most significant changes wrought
by the adoption of the amendment to
the federal constitution providing for
the election of United States Sena
tors by direct vote of the people is
that it deprives the governors of the
states of the power to appoint sena
tors in case of vacancies when the
legislature is not in session. Unless
the legislature expressly empowers
the governor to appoint he can do
nothing in such a contingency.
The following clause in the amend
ment is the one that governs the fill
ing of vacancies.
"When vacancies happen in the rep
resentation of any state in the sen
ate. the executive authority of such j
state shall issue writs of election to
fill such vacancies, provided that the j
legislature of any state may empower
the executive thereof to make tern-'
porary appointments until the people
fill up the vacancies by election as the
legislature may direct.
Under the constitution, before it
power to fill a vacancy In the senate
power to fill a vacancy 1 nthe senate
by appointment until the legislature
met. Hereafter it is made mandatory
upon the governor to order a popu
lar election unless he is authorized by I
legislative act to make temporary ap
pointments.
That Will Help Some.
Anyhow the fact that the grand jury
is in session will cause the grafters
and crooks to lay low for a season.?
Seattle Sun.
MINING APPLICATION NO. 01602"
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, May 15, 1913.
Notice is hereby given that the Alas
i ka-Gastineau Mining Company, a cor
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New York,
and qualified to do and doing business
as a corporation in Juneau, Alaska,
has made application for patent to the
Gastineau Millsite, Survey No. 990,
in the Harris Mining District, Juneau
Land District, District of Alaska, de
scribed as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at Corner No. 1 identi
cal with location corner and with Cor
ners Nos. 2, 4 and 3 of Perseverance
No. 4 lode, Perseverance No. 3 lode
and Perseverance Placer, all of Sur
vey No. 605 respectively, whence U.
S. L. M. No. 2 bears N. 59? 10' 51" W.
1892.08 feet distant, thence N. 24? 30'
E. (Var. 34 E.) 761 feet to Corner No.
2; thence S. 39? 30' E. (Var. 31? 30' E.)
213.47 feet to Corner No. 3; thence S.
40? 28' \V. (Var. 31? 30' E.) 694.07
feet to Corner No. 1, the place of be
ginning. Containing an area of 1.674
acres.
The names of the adjoining claims
are Perseverance No. 3 lode (pat
ented), Perseverance Placer (patent
ed), Martin lode( unpatented), all be
longing to the Alaska-Gastineau Min
ing Company, and the Solo lode claim
(unpatented) belonging to Jesse
Blakely, Esquire.
The location notice of the Gastineau
mill site is recorded in Book 11 of
Placers, at page 106 of the records of
the Recorder for the Juneau Record
ing Precinct, District of Alaska.
This notice was posted on the ground
the 15th day of May, 1913.
First publication, May 16, 1913.
Last publication, July 18, 1913.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
Aye, Aye!
The proposed celebration of the
centenary of peace between the Brit
ish Km pi re and the United States is
one that should be enthusiastically re
ceived on both sides of the line and
on both sides of the Atlantic.?Prince
Rupert Empire.
Breaking It Gently.
"Do you think ice is going to bo
cheaper this summer?"
"Yes," replied the dealer who does
not wish to offend; "that is to say, I
think it will be cheaper this summer
than it will next."
Position of Advantage.
"How did you come to be sent to
Congress?" said the inquisitive per
son.
"Well," replied Senator Sorghum,
"some of my influential constituents
concluded I could do better work for
them 011 the floor than I could as a
regular lobbyist."
In the United States Commissioner's;
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus*
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner. Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and eutered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby uotifled to present them, with
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April. 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. iMoore, Berta Jar my and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner,
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upon the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the fir6t publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost:
of said anuual labor as required by j
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned ; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma Is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth i
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postoffice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska: and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of P'acer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
R. A. GUNNISON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau ? ? ? Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
* ?-1 nirnnrirrT'
J. r. VjviiiivEi11
ARCHITECT
427 Walker Building, Seattle
205 Seward St. JUNEAU
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland |
Contractors-Builders
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
'PHONE?209
WHEN YOU want to eat well, go
to the Commercial Cafe Dining Room,
Lunch Counter, Private Boxes. The
choicest viands at lowest prices. For
reservations for private partieB, phone
281. 3-6-tf.
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Ex
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tonakee, Killisnoo, Chatham and
Sitka 8:00 a. m. April 4, 10, 16,
22, 28; May 4, 10, 16, 22, 28;
June 3, 9, 15, 21, 27; July 3, 9,
15. 21, 27: August 2, 8, 14. 20,
26; September 1, 7, 13, 19,
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2. 8, 14. 20, 26; June 1. 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12. 18, 24, 30; September
5, 11. 17, 23, and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer ?# HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND MAY 24
SOUTHBOUND MAY 25
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
M' 1 11 I 1 1 M I 1 I I I I I 1 I II I I 111 1 1 I I I 'M H I I 1 1 I I I 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 I 1
ALASKA 1
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service, Sped Tickets to Seattle, Tncoma. Victoria and Vancouver. ThroUKh
?' tickets to San Francisco J
?? JEFFERSON Northbound ....MAY 19 Southbound.... May 20 4
;; MARIPOSA Northbound MAY 27 Southbound JUNE 3 f
;; NORTHWESTERN Northb'd... MAY 22 Southbound .... MAY 30 T
Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. 4
?I I I 1 ! M ?! I 1 1 I I I I I I I !? 1 I 11 ?I'i'l 1 -l-l I 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 M I I I 1 I 1 I 1
? ?
<? a irVf^TI II A I I rv Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
if INORTIILAIND
o <>
c>, | ? John Henson, Douglas Agent
o Steamship Company
<> < >
<? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU n
<? o
o <?
]| Southbound Sailings S. ALKl, - May 18, 31 t
j" *-< , o j.j.1 First Class $19.00
\? rare to oeattle second ciass $12.00 ??
11II11111111111111111 III I1II1111111111111111111111III
If ALASKA COAST CO. !j
. . For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ??
Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU i!
I! S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON MAY 8 "
I | S. S. YUKON MAY 24 | ;
;; SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ;;
?' S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON MAY 17 ??
? ! S. S. YUKON WAY 10 I !
' ? Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. . .
!Jj S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle 11
?n 11111 ii 1111 ii 11111111111111111111111111111111111111
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. jl
i: SEATTL.E, TACOMA,
o Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympla, Port Townaend, o
South Belllngham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco,
< > Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego.
o C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. n
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle <>
1?
< > S. S. SPOKANE North Way 3-14-25?South May 4-15-26
o CITY OF SEATTLE North Way 9-20-3i_S. May 10 June 1 n
?
, Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C. Coast Service
Sailinic from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swanson. Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria nnd Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P.C DOCK MAY 25
J Front and Seward Sts. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J.T.SPICKETT. Act |
I FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukIaa nnd }
Treadwcll
*S:00 :i. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trend
well for
Juneau
*S : 121> a. m. j
9:25 a. m. I
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. ra.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
6jJ0 p. m.
From Jumiiu for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nixht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
8heep Creek
11:40 p. ra.
Leaves Treadwell
11:46 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
^jSundayJSchcdultMUirTHMiHjibove^xcepU^
*
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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