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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 31, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG f
JOHN W. TROY, Editor.
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the postotllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
O** year, by mail $10.00
Six mouths, by mail 5-00
Per month, delivered 1-0U
A NEW INDUSTRY
N2WS comes from Wrangell that there is a movement on loot
to establish a wood pulp mill near that thriving town, a
concession of some 20,000 acres of timber land having been
secured from the government. It is to be hoped that this pulp
plant is the precursor of a number of similar enterprises in
Alaska. There is no reason why Alaska should not be an import
ant factor in the production of pulp for the manufacture of pa
per. We have abundance of suitable wood, which can be utilized
to great advantage in this way. If not made use of in due seas
on it goes to waste.
New industrial enterprises are as necessary to Alaska's per
manent growth and prosperity as they are elsewhere. It may
be set down as a fact that Alaska is beginning to attract the at-'
tent ion of people elsewhere in the United States and in Europe
because of its industrial opportunities. Water power is a most
important adjunct in manufacturing in this age of electricity.
So it need not be wondered that manufacturers and capitalists
are looking to countries which have water power to oifer and the i
natural resources that may be transformed into finished prod-1
ucts of everyday use.
It cannot be doubted that the Southeastern and Southwest
ern Alaska coasts offer splendid opportunities that will be eager
ly sought for the development of our natural resources in the
coming years.
If one-half the reports be true as to labor conditions in
the coal mines of West Virginia, that State is a right oRe to be
ashamed of.
ANARCHISTS IN EVENING CLOTHES.
WE ARE told that the National capital is now filled with lob
byists who are endeavoring to influence tariff legislation
in the interests of the manufacturers.
Before the Underwood bill had passed the House, certain
manufacturers who had grown rich by capitalizing the tariff
laws of the United States began to threaten a general reduction
in wages if their favored industries were put on a competitive
basis. Mr. Underwood's reply was that if any manufacturer re
duced wages on the pretext that taritf revision had made it neces
sary, the Department of Commerce would proceed to examine
his books and ascertain whether he was telling the truth or ly
ing. The facts would be made public.
Mr. Underwood was immediately deluged with high-protec
tion denunciation. When Secretary Redfield declared he would
carry out the Underwood program, some of these manufacturers
declared they would either close their factories or move to Eur
ope. That is the measure of tariff-bloated patriotism. Having
been subsidized all these years by the American people, those ar
rogant anarchists of industry now are serving notice that the
subsidy must be continued or they will retaliate upon the country
whose opportunities and generosity have made them rich. They
will accept tariff reduction only on the condition that labor is
mulcted. That is their ultimatum to the Congress and the Pres
ident. And these are the gentlmen who declaim against the in
dustrial Hay woods who threaten the employer with ruin and
starvation if they cannot rule government, while they themselves
threaten labor with ruin and starvation if their pleas for high
protection are unheeded! Anarchy in evening clothes is no
more attractive than anarchy in overalls.
Labor does not propose to be liquidated, if we read aright
the signs of the times, so long as the profits of management are
what they have been in the past and what they are today. Nor
can the reasonable reductions of the tariff now proposed suffice
for an excuse for reduction in wages until liquidation has been
ruthlessly applied to the evils of management as these now exist.
Congressman Humphrey, if he should secure an. investiga
tion of the forest service, may discover "a nigger in the wood
pile."
LET THE BATTLE RAGE.
THE rate war that is about to be waged between the White
Pass & Yukon Railroad and the Northern Navigation Com
pany, will be viewed with much equanimity by Alaskans and
Yukoners, who will be the gainers. Neither concern is entitled
to sympathy. Both have charged "all the traffic would bear,"
and more, for many years. Both have paid heavy profits to their
stockholders, and if the miner, the prospector and merchant's
load be lightened temporarily, the fighting rivals will not suffer
materially.
Neither Alaska nor the Yukon owe the belligerents any
thing?not even their good will. Both corporations have found
the north countries rich ground for exploitation and they have
never missed an opportunity to milk it to the last drop. Both
have exercised a complete?not to say grinding?monopoly, and
each has done much to retard the development of its respective
domain, by the levying of unjust and inequitable tribute upon a
helpless people in order to enrich its foreign owners.
And yet both probably actually believe that they have been
the greatest developing factors of the North, and will perhaps
tell of the sacrifices they have made, the expenses entailed in
their altruistic efforts to carry the white man's burden, or per
chance they may even recount their heavy losses?but never one
word about the enormous profits wrung from the men who have
made this country what it is, despite spoilation and spoilators. I
Let the battle rage. No Northern tears will be shed for
the dying or the dead.
Fitting Reward for Good Work.
While the Senate delayB the passage
of the Underwood tariff bill the House
can put in its time on the bleachers.
?New York World.
The world owes us all a living ahd
some break into the penitentiary to
collect it
o?o?o
Waffles all day at "IT and I" Lunch
Room. 4-141m.
BOSTON MAGAZINE
PRAISES SELECTIONS
Joe Mitchell Chappelle, in his "Af
fairs at Washington" department of
his own National Magazine, published
at boston, praises the attitude of the
administration toward Alaska and the
appointments that have been made for
the Territory. In the June number
just at hand he says:
"The new administration has been
especially fortunate in its Alaskan ap
pointments. Major Strong, the newly
appointed Governor, will undoubtedly
give our arctic territory an elllcient
and enterprising administration. The
appointment of Kobert W. Jennings
as Judge of the United States District
Court of the First Division, is also in
keeping with the determination to give
Alaska a territorial government equal
to the needs of an enormous area, rich
tin minerals and other resources, and
occupied by a resourceful and enter
prising people.
"The untimely death of .Mr. A. J. j
Daly, late national committeeman from
Alaska, shortly after completing his
work at Baltimore, deprived the Dem
ocratic organization of Alaska of a
leader who has been identified for
the past twenty years not only with
the politics but the business develop
ment of Alaska. It seemed fitting
that the territorial and division com
mitteemen should approve for the po
sition of marshal of the Second Divis-I
ion the appointment of Mr. J. P. Daly,
a brother of the late committeemanI
who had so long served his party in
the Far North.
"The Alaskan situation has always
been strenuous and picturesquely ex
citing from the first rush and perils of
the earlier inundation of prospectors
and speculators following the discov
ery of gold down to the present time.
Incriminations and recriminations be
tween officials and competing compan
ies have abounded, and the northern
territory as a result has presented a
fertile field for the muckraker. until
the general public is impressed with
the idea that wire-pulling has vied with
mining as one of Alaska's chief injlus
tries. As was remarked by a depart
ment official who visited Alaska during
the summer, the Democratic party of
Alaska will indeed put a feather in
its cap if harmony can be established
between the industrial and political
leaders of that splendid territory."
o?O?0
JOSEPH W. FOLK
AFTER SENATORSHIP
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., May 29.?I
A State official is authority for the
statement that Former Gov. Joseph
W. Folk has determined to enter the
contest against Senator William J.'
Stone, or any other Democrat who
may seek the job for Stone's seat in
the United States Senate. That ac
tion on the part of the ex-governor
had been anticipated by the politicians
here. It is said that he has already be
gun his campaign.
o?o?0
HUNTERS AND TRAPPERS:?
Highest cash price paid for all kinds
of raw furs at Will's store. 4-7-t.f.
o?o?o
Clam chowder every day at "U and
I" Lunch Room. 4-14-lm.
Meeting Board Equalization
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
Common Council of the City of Ju
neau will meet as a Board of Equal
ization on Tuesday June 3, 1913, in
the Council Chamber, Third and
Franklin streets at the hour of two
| p. m. and will coutlnue in session un
til the hour of four p. m. of said day
| and will continue In session until the
Monday next following between the
hours of two and four p. m. of each
day for the purpose of equalizing the
assessments of property in the City
of Juneau for Municipal taxes for the
year 1913.
Witness my hand and the oillcial
seal of the City of Juneau this 28th
day of May, 1913.
(Seal) W. T. LUCAS,
Municipal Clerk of the
City of Juneau, Alaska.
May 28, 29, 30; June 3, 4, and 5.
MINING APPLICATION NO. 01602
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, May 15, 1913.
Notice Is hereby given that the Alas
ka-Gastlneau Mining Company, a cor
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New York,
and qualified to do and doing business
as a corporation in Juneau, Alaska,
has made application for patent to the
Gastineau Millsite, Survey No. 990,
in the Harris Mining District, Juneau
Land District, District of Alaska, de
scribed as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at Corner No. 1 identi
cal with location corner and with Cor
ners Nob. 2, 4 and 3 of Perseverance
No. 4 lode, Perseverance No. 3 lode
and Perseverance Placer, all of Sur- (
vey No. 605 respectively, whence U.
S. L. M. No. 2 bears N. 69? 10' 51" W. I
1892.08 feet distant, thence N. 24? 30' .
E. (Var. :i4 E.) 701 feet to Corner No. j
2; thence S. 39 30' E. (Var. 31" 30'E.l j
213.47 feet to Corner No. 3; thence S. j
40" 28' W. (Var. 31? 30' E.) 694.07
feet to Corner No. 1, the place of be- i
ginning. Containing an area of 1.674 j
acres.
The names of the adjoining claims
are Perseverance No. 3 lode (pat
ented), Perseverance Placer (patent
ed I, Martin lode( unpatented), all be
longing to the Alaska-Gastlneau Min
ing Company, and the Solo lode claim
(unpatented) belonging to Jesse
Blakely, Esquire.
The location notice of t)ie Gastineau
mill site is recorded in Book 11 of [
Placers, at page 106 of the records of
the Itecorder for the Juneau Record
ing Precinct, District of Alaska.
This notice was posted on the ground
the 15th day of May, 1913.
First publication, May 16, 1913.
Last publication, July 18, 1913.
C. B. WALKER,
Register. ,
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Vakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are 1
hereby notified to present them, with 1
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. B1GFORD
Administrator
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, Berta Jarniy and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notifieu that you co-owner
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Duni group of placer
claims and upou the Duck creek group
of placer claims, for the year ending
December 31st, 1812, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice. pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by!
law, and the cost of this notice, your
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, hi come the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding j
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dtim
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postoffice at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of P'acer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8. 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO. ]
United States Mail Steamer 1
S. S. GEORGIA <
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funt*r, Ex
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, Gypeu*,
Tenakee, Killisnoo, Chatham asA I
Sitka 8:00 a. m. April i, It, 1At
22, 2S; May 4, 10, 16, 22, 3tl
June 3, 9, 16, 21, 27; July S? % I -
15, 21, 27; Auguirt 2, 8, 14 E
26; September 1, f, 21, If,
and 26. s
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
in. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May.
2, 8, 14. 20, 26; June 1, 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12, 18, 24. 30; September
5, 11, 17. 23. and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
n 111 m 111111111111 ii i n 111111 c 11111111111 m 11111111
i will move in a few days to my
new store building
? ' On the Corner of ..
j; FRANKLIN FERRY STREETS |j
11 I CHARICKI
Jim %J m k J jeweler & optician ::
' ' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ml I I I I I I I I I I I I I I | 1 I
Professional Cards
J. B. MARSHALL
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
114 Decker Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
?J*
Lewis Building, Juneau .
__________________
Gunnison & Robertson
ATTORN EYSAT-L AW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska .!
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor "
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau 4
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity' Pharmacy
Juneau ? ? ? Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
= 1
Dr. J. S. Harrison
DENTIST I
Rooms 10G-107 Decker Bldg.
'Phono 2-0-5 Juneau, Alaska
\V. H. Cl.KVKI.AND P. J. Cl.KVKI.AND j
Contractors-Builders i
Estimates Furnished Free Upon \
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results j
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
;
H. W. AVERILL *
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m. 4
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. }
'PHONE?209 | }
4
iN
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastScrvice
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swnnson, Alert Ray. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P.C DOCK MAY 25
Front and Seward Sts. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKKTT, Agt. |j
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. .
j
The* Aluhka Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The At/i.tkn Flyer
NORTHBOUND JUNE 4
SOUTHBOUND JUNE 5
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD. Agent
?H11 I I 1 1 I 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 I 1 I I I I 1-H-M I I 1 I 1 I I 1 I I I I ?1 1 1 H I
Wx ALASKA j
\ STEAMSHIP COMPANY
, Safety, Service, Speed Ticket* to Scuttle, Tacoma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through
> ticket* to Sun Kranciaco
JEFFERSON Northbound ....MAY 31 Southbound... .J U N E 1 j
JEFFERSON Northbound ... JUNE 13 Southbound . JUNE 14 j
I MARIPOSA Northbound JUNE 9 Southbound . .JUNE 18
; NORTHWESTERN Southbound JUNE 3 ?
i NORTHWESTERN Northb'd...JUNE 15 Southbound . .JUNE 22 j
! Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. ;?
"H-H-1-F4-H-fr-H-H-H-H ?! I .i-m-m-I-I-M-H 1 I I t I I I 1 I I I I 1 I I I I I 1-8
????????????????????<><????????????????????????????????
IIAHTLII A 1 ||\ Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
| I iL/ll lLZ wlth Juneau T ransfer Co. $
r>, | ? John Henson, Douglas Agent ?
Steamship Company ?
REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU I
Southbound Sailings S.S. ALKI, May 31, June 12 I
r* , Q . ? 1 First Class $19.00 |
rare to oeattle second ciass $12.00 ?
? I I I I I M I It I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I II II II I I I I I
; ALASKA COAST CO. ji
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ?>
Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
[ C. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 18
E S. S. YUKON JUNE 29 ;;
t SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA
P S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 6 ?>
P S. S. YUKON ??
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. . .
E S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H I I I ' I I
! PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO.
j kkattjj:, tacoma, f
i Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, o
> South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, 0
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. ''
P C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
y 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle 0
?
S. 5. SPGKAiNE North Junc 5 South June 6 t
C?r Y 01r SEATTLE North June 11-24 South June 1227 <i
o
? t Fcrcrvcd to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
" a
SUMMER FERRY TIME SCHEDULE STARTING MAY 26, 1913.
Boat Loaves Juneau
For DoukIus and
Treadwell
G:30 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
0:00 a. m.
11:00 a. in.
1:00 p. in.
2:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
5:00 p. in.
G:30 p. in.
8:00 p. ill.
9:30 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Leavett Tread well For
DoukIu* and
Juneau
7:10 a. in.
8:25 a. m.
9:40 a. m.
11:25 a. in.
1:25 p. m.
2:25 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
5:40 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:55 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
DoukIom For
Juneau
7: ir> a. in.
if: 30 a. in.
9:45 a. in.
11:30 a. in.
1:30 p. in.
2:30 p. m.
3:30 p. in.
5:45 p. in.
7:00 p. ni.
8:30 p. ni.
10:00 p. ni.
11:30 p. in.
Louvcw Sheep Creek
For Trend well Douiflan
ami Jumtiu
7:00 a. in.
9:30 a. 111.
5:30 p. m.
SHEEP CREEK TRIPS
Leaves Juneau for
Sheep Creek
6:30 a. in.
9:00 a. m.
5:00 p. m. j
Leaves Douglas for
Sheep Creek
G: 15 a. m.
9:15 a. m.
5:15 p. m.
Leaves rroauweii
for Sheep Creek
6:50 a. m.
9:20 a. in.
5:20 p. m.
On Saturday and Wednesday nights 11 p. m. trip will go to Sheep UreeK.
Leaving Treadwell for Juneau at 11:40 p. ni.; leaving Douglas for Juneau
it 11:45 p. in.
*
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
?

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