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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 02, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
JOHN W. TROY, Editor.
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1911! at tbe postoilice at Ju
ueau. Alaska, under tbe Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Uoe year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 6.00
Per month, delivered l.Oo
BASEBALL SEASON FAIRLY STARTED
THE baseball game yesterday between Juneau and Douglas
may be said to have been the beginning of the local baseball
season. It was the first game in the series that has been
agreed upon for the championship pennant between teams rep
resenting the two sides of the channel, and, inasmuch as each town
had won one game before it was played, it makes a fair starting
point. Baseball is a wholesome, manly sport. It is the recog
nized American national game. It otters pleasing and healthful
recreation to those that enjoy witnessing its playing, and these
include practically the entire population. The people of the Gas
tineau cities may well congratulate themselves that all the indi
cations are favorable for a season of first-class amateur base
ball sport.
Juneau has taken hold of the Fourth of July proposition in
a manner that means that the celebration will be one of great suc
cess. But Juneau has contracted the habit of taking hold of pub
lic propositions in just that way. and there has been no one to
suggest that the habit be broken.
REPRESENTATIVE GAFFNEY
THE departure of Representative Thomas Gatfney for his home
at Nome takes away from the Capital the last of the non
resident members of the first Alaska Legislature that made
the early spring months of 1913 notable ones in the affairs of
our great Territory, and removes from our city a sturdy, cour
ageous character that we have all learned to admire and like. Mr.
Gatfney is a man of strong convictions, an active conscience and
a capable mind that has been trained by an experienced life among
the working classes of the West. While he was recognized in the
Legislature as the special friend of the workingman, his view
point was, generally speaking, broad, and his genial disposition
and gentlemanly conduct gained friends for him among those of
all classes. He returns to his Nome constituency with the knowl
edge that he has fought a good fight and kept the faith. The
Empire predicts that the people of Alaska will hear more from
Mr. Gatfney as the years pass 011.
If anything more than the frequent reunion of Federal and
Confederate veterans were required to demonstrate that there
is no longer anything left of the sting that came from the Civil
War it is furnished by the fact that there has not been asingle
remark about the recognition of "Rebel Brigadiers" by the pres
ent administration notwithstanding that the President has ap
pointed scions of the Breekenridge, Lamar, Stephens, Lee and
other famous Confederate families to office.
CHANGES IN THE CONSTITUTION
THE promulgation of the Seventeenth amendment to the Con
stitution Saturday recalls that after all this Republic, that
was regarded as the acme of progressivism when it was
launched, is conservative in its progression. While it does not
hesitate to take radical steps when its mind is clear as to their
necessity, it takes plenty of time to deliberate before arriving
at a radical conclusion. The Seventeenth amendment marks the
second great change that has been made in the fundamental
law since the settlement of the issues growing out of the Civil
War more than forty years ago?and the two are directly con
nected with the same general proposition.
In the century and a quarter that has elapse d since the adop
tion of the Constitution there have been but seventeen amend
ments adopted to that instrument, and even that statement, with
out explanation, would give an exaggerated idea of the changes
that have taken place, for the important amendments may be
properlyr consolidated into two groups?three if we include the
first ten amendments, the bill-of-rights amendments, the adop
tion of which was practically agreed upon as a condition precedent
to the ratification of the Constitution in the first instance. The
eleventh amendment had nothing to do with fundamental prin
ciples, but simply more clearly defined the powers of the federal
courts, and properly belongs with the first group. The twelfth
amendment, likewise, was a matter of detail, providing for a more
definite manner of choosing the President and Vice-President,
and was the result of the tangle that the country got into
when Jefferson and Burr, candidates of their party for Presi
dent and Vice-President respectively, received me same numuei
of votes for President because each Presidential elector at that
time cast two votes for President instead of one for President
and one for Vice-President as provided for in that amendment.
The first real change, therefore, in the Constitution came
with the Civil War. The thirteenth, fourteenth and fifteenth
amendments, adopted between 1865 and 1870, abolished slav
ery, made Negroes citizens, and conferred the elective franchise
upon the colored citizens.
The second change has begun with the sixteenth and seven
teenth amendments. The first of these provides for the income
tax and the second for the direct election of Senators. Both are
the result of the progressive movement that was fairly launched
in the famous campaign of 1896. Whether more will come be
fore the tide of that movement begins to ebb or not, only time
will tell.
This is a far more conservative record than those that made
the constitution expected. In fact, some of the constitution mak
ers favored the holding of constitutional conventions at stated
periods. Jefferson, who was in France at the time the conven
tion was in session, once espoused this plan, and suggested conven
tions to consider the fundamental law not less frequently than
one in every twenty years.
Those who think the Republican party was wrecked by the
failure of the conferences of the leaders that attended the Re
publican convention at Chicago last year and who expect to heal
-
the breaches by more conferring by those at the top are reckon
ing from the wrong star. The wounds in the organization were
caused by deep-seated differences among the masses, and there
the healing processes of time must work thmselves out if that
party is again to assume the formidable place in the affairs of
the Nation that it once occupied.
While as a general proposition traffice rate wars intoxicate
rather than develop trade and commerce and usually result in a
reaction that carries the final cost to the consumers, the White
Pass & Yukon and the Northern Navigation Company seem to
have concluded that there is no other way of settling the ques-|
tion of supremacy on the Yukon river, so the people of the North
will accept what enjoyment and profit they can from the war
while it lasts, and consider the antidote for the after effects when
the day for that shall arrive.
No one has yet accused Sir Thomas Lipton of being anything
but a game sportsman, yet he did wait until Nat Herreshoff1
was out of the way before making his fourth challenge for the
America's cup.
I _?_
YUKON NAVIGATION WILL
HE LATE IN STARTING
?o-o?
Word received at Juneau is that
the ice probably will not move out of
Lake La Large for more than a week
yet. It is solid at the present time
and gives no promise of breaking up
soon. At Skagway it is not believed
that the first boat will sail from White
horse for Dawson until June 10th, and
possibly later than that.
Those in Juneau that contemplate
going down the river are advised by
those that left this place early in the
week to catch the first boat that they
had as well remain where they are for
another week.
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner, Probate Judge
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1913.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator
Meeting Board Equalization
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Common Council of the City of Ju
neau will meet as a Board of Equal
ization on Tuesday June 3, 1913, in
the Council Chamber, Third and
Franklin streets at the hour of two
p. m. and will continue in session un
til the hour of four p. m. of said day
and will continue in session until the
Monday next following between the
hours of two and four p. m. of each
day for the purpose of equalizing the
assessments of property in the City
of Juneau for Municipal taxes for the
year lyia.
Witness my hand and the oflicial
seal of the City of Juneau this 2Sth
day of May, 1913.
(Seal) W. T. LUCAS,
Municipal Clerk of the
City of Juneau, Alaska.
May 28, 29, 30; June 3, 4, and 5. | I
MINING APPLICATION NO. 01602 <
United States Land Office, Juneau, <
Alaska, May 15, 1913. <
Notice is hereby given that the Alas- <
ka-Gastineau Mining Company, a cor- <
poration organized and existing under h
the laws of the State of New York, <
and qualified to do and doing business <
as a corporation in Juneau, Alaska, *
has made application for patent to the j <
Gastineau Mlllsite, Survey No. 990,; <
in the Harris Mining District, Juneau <
Land District, District of Alaska, de- <
scribed as follows, to-wlt: <
Beginning at Corner No. 1 identi- <
cal with location corner and with Cor- *
ners Nos. 2, 4 and 3 of Perseverance <
No. 4 lode, Perseverance No. 3 lode '
and Perseverance Placer, all of Sur- <
vey No. 605 respectively, whence U. *
S. L. M. No. 2 bears N. 59? 10' 51" W. <
1892.08 feet distant, thence N. 24? 30' <
E. (Var. 34 E.) 761 feet to Corner No. J
2; thence S. 39? 30' E. (Var. 31? 30'E.) <
213.47 feet to Corner No. 3; thence S. <
40" 28' W. (Var. 31? 30' E.) 694.07 \
feet to Corner No. 1, the place of be- 4
ginning. Containing an area of 1.614 4
acres. }
The names of the adjoining claims <
are Perseverance No. 3 lode (pat- J
ented), Perseverance Placer (patent- \
ed), Martin lode( unpatented), all be- 4
longing to the Alaska-Gastineau Mln- 1
ing Company, and the Solo lode claim <
(unpatented) belonging to Jesse <
Blakely, Esquire. <
The location notice of the Gastineau i
mill site is recorded in Book 11 of <
Placers, at page 106 of the records of *
the Recorder for the Juneau Record- j
ing Precinct, District of Alaska. \
This notice was posted on the ground 4
the 15th day of May, 1913.
First publication, May 16, 1913. [ 4
Last publication, July 18, 1913. I 4
C. B. WALKER, J
Register. ! 4
REV. Ij. F. JONES
WRITES FROM ATLANTA
A letter received from the Rev. I., i
P. Jones says that he is having a good '
time in Atlanta, but that it is very
warm for tin Alaskan. The great '
Presbyterian convention is a grand
success. There has been nothing like
it in the history of the church.
o?o?o
A complete line of tobacco jars andj
pipe racks at BURFOUD'S.
o?o?o
Waftles all day at "TT and I" Lunch
Room. 4-141m.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore. Berta Jarmy aad
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you
are hereby notified that you co-owner
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
tion 2324 United States Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22nd, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims,
upon the Sum Dum group of placer j
claims and upou the Duck creek group i
of placer claims, for the year ending j
December 31st, 1912, for the purpose
of holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days!
after the first publication of this no-,
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by'
i law, and the cost of this notice, your |
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is $25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,1
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
.$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Fower's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postoffice at Sum Dum. Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of P'acer
records, on the 5tb day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON.
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mall Steamer
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
.Juneau for r'uuitsr. it?
cursio.i I:i!rt, Hoouah, Jypi?um
Trunin o, Killlsnoo, Chatham ami
Sitka 8:00 a. in. April 4. Ill HI
22, 28; May 4. 10. IS. **. ;?>;
June 9, 15. 21, 27; July < ?
15, 21, 27; August 2 8. 14 ?*'
20; September 1 'h I
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 2Sth, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 26th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Kagle Itiver, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2. 8. 14, 20, 26; June 1, 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7, 13. 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12, 18, 24, 30; September
5. 11. 17, 23, and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWKLL, MANAGER
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for l'ort Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swunson, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P.C DOCK MAY 25
Front and Seward Sts. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK ETT. Atrt. |
IIIII11 It It 1111II111111111111II111111111111 l-l 11111111
I WILL MOVE IN A FEW DAYS TO MY
NEW STORE BUILDING
' ' On the Corner of
jj FRANKLIN & FERRY STREETS j;
i I I QHARICKI
:: JLo ? k/ JEWELER & OPTICIAN ::
i 111111111111111111111111II111111II111111111111111111
Professional Cards
J. B. MARSHALL !
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
114 Decker Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY t|
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Robertson
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewi6 Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau ? ? - Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
Dr. J. S. Harrison
. DENTIST
Koonib 10G-107 Decker Bldg.
'Phone 2-0-5 Juneau, Alaska
W. H. CL.KVKI.AND P. J. Cl.KVKI.AND
Contractors-Builders
Estimates Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
?PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
4 H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
?PHONE?209
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. ,
The* Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND e.. JUNE 4
SOUTHBOUND JUNE 5
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GKO. BUKFOHD, Agent
1 1 1 I !??! M I 1 I II I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I
j W\ ALASKA
. STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Sorvlco. Speed Tickets to Seattle, Tncoma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through ?
tickets to San Francisco ??
?? JEFFERSON Northbound MAY 31 Southbound JUNE 1 ;;
I! JEFFERSON Northbound JUNE 13 Southbound ..JUNE 14 ??
" MARIPOSA Northbound JUNE 9 Southbound . .JUNE 18 I!
?? NORTHWESTERN Southbound JUNE 3 ^
I! NORTHWESTERN Northb'd . .. JUNE 15 Southbound .. J U N E 22 ;?
;; Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. \
v-H-i-H-I'Inn-I-l-l-l'MLI"! 1 1 1 M-MiHM II II I I I 1 I I I 1 II I 1 I M I I
t ?
? n AHTI IB A |k I rv Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
? I I | I Lril 1 \_J W'th ^uneau transfer Co.
? <?
p. i ? John Henson, Douglas Agent V
I Steamship Company ::
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU o
? Southiwund Sailings S.S. ALKI, May 31, June 12 j!
It? ? c J.J.1 First Class $19.00 \\
% rare to ocattlc Second Class $12.00 ;;
I I I > I I M I II I I I I I I I I I I I It I I M I i I U I II I II II I I I I I I I I I I I I
| ALASKA COAST CO. j!
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, > >
II Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU ||
II C. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 18 ||
; ; S. S. YUKON JUNE 29 ; ;
|| SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ||
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 0 ?>
?? S. S. YUKON ? ? ? MA !!
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ..
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle 11
> I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I * I I ?
0 PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. <!
1 SEATTLi:, TACC >MA, j|
o Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, o
^ South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, <>
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego.
: o C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. <>
: 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle <>
t
Jl S. S. SPOKANE North June 5 South June 6 I
o CITY OF SEATTLE North June 11*24 South June 1227
o <?
Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. **
SUMMER FERRY TIME SCHEDULE STARTING MAY 26, 1913. j
Boat Leaven Juneau
For DoukIum and
Trend well
G:30 a. m.
S:00 a. in.
i*: 00 a. m.
11:00 a. in.
1:00 p. in.
2:00 p. m.
2:00 p. m.
5:00 p. m.
G:30 p. in.
8:00 p. in.
9:30 p. in.
11:00 p. ni.
Lvaves Trend well For
DoukIus x'kI
Juneau
7:10 il. III.
8:25 a. in.
9:40 a. in.
11:25 a. ni.
1:25 p. in.
2:25 p. in.
3:25 p. in.
5:40 p. ill.
6:55 p. in.
8:25 p. in.
9:55 p. in.
11:25 p. m.
o i i p r n r Dt
Loaves
I)uuk1u.h For
Juneau
7:15 a. m.
8: SO a. in.
0:45 a. in.
11:30 a. in.
1:30 p. in.
2:30 p. in.
3:30 p. in.
5:45 p. ill.
7:00 p. in.
8:30 p. m.
10:00 p. in.
11:30 p. m.
:ci/ TDIDC
LwiVf# Sheep Creek
For TroHilwoli DuukIuh
ami Juneau
7:00 a. m.
9:150 a. in.
5:30 p. m.
onQiirv^nt&rvinir^
Leaves Juneau ior
Sheep Creek
G:J0 a. in.
ft:00 a. m.
5:00 p. in.
i.eaves wougius iur
Sheep Creek
6:45 a. m.
9: IS a. m.
5:15 p. m.
hea > Co 11 raw w **n
for Sheep Creek
6:50 a. in.
9:20 a. m.
5:20 p. m.
On Saturday and Wednesday nignts u p. m. irip wm go w oueep v rwn,
Leaving Tread well for Juneuu at 11:40 p. in.; leaving Douglas for Juneau
at 11:45 p. in.
: We Are Headquarters for i:
| DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
I BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
I / !!
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
i ? i >
-

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