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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 04, 1913, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
*??. ,, ?? JUNEAU, ALASKA. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4. 1913. PRICE TEN CENTS
\OL. II.. NO. lii.
RAILWAY BILL MAY WIN OUT YET
* I
? - M A 4 4
Juveniles Score Great Hit
in the "Rose of Blandeen"
"The Rose of Blandeen," as presented i
by the Juvenile Bostoniaus at the Or
pheum last night was a decided hit.
There wasn't a dull moment during
the entire performance. The house
was again packed every seat occu
pied and even the standing room all
taken. The play is a real tuneful lit
tle opera in two acts and pronounced
Iv Irish. It just suits the company.
The slender plot is almost buried be
neath the comedy parts with which the
play abounds. It fairly reeks with
comedy. The choruses are all good
and the songs catchy. A few jokes |
were offered and local shots were
greeted with bursts of approval.
Among the musical numbers. "Cuddle
Closer," by Ina Mitchell and Thorn
Hellen: "Take a Little Tip from Path
er." bv Dixit* White; "Life Is Only a
Merry-Go-Round," by I'atsie Henry;
"Tommy Atkins," by Doris Canfleld;
"Don't Forget My Number," by Doris
Cantield and Bee Myling; "Wild Irish
Rose," by Thorn Hellen. and "That's
What You Get for Being Irish," by
Dixie White, were warmly received.
All of the principals were perfectly
familiar with their parts and carried
out their work faultlessly. The work
of Dixie White as Con Harrlgan was
exceptionally good as was also that
of I'atsie Henry, Doris Cantieid and
Bee Myling.
The company plays in Douglas to
night and tomorrow night and return
ing here will play in the Orphetim Sat
urday matinee. Saturday. Sunday and
Monday nights.
SALMON CREEK DAM
CAUSES ACTIVITY
One of the greatest power dams in
the country and the greatest piece of
concrete construction in all Alaska
ts rapidly approaching the formative
stage in the upper basin of Salmon
creek. This great work of the Alas
ka-Oastlneau Mining Company will
probably be nearly completed if no*
entirely finished by fall, at the present
rate of progress. The dam site is a
very busy spot just now. A head of
water has been secured 200 feet;
above the workings and hydraulic
monitors are now cleaning off the de- j
bris and surface obstruction for the
dam foundation. A compressor was1
recently iustalled and machine drills
are pounding away in the blasting
process of making a foundation for the
great concrete wall.
Over a hundred men are engcded
here and this force will be increased
as the work develops. Soon the great
tower for pouring the cement will be
erected. This structure will be 325
feet above the foundation of the dam.
The gravel and sand washing plant is
being established near at hand. The
sand and gravel to be used lies in
abundance in the valley close by.
The Dam.
The great impounding dam will be
625 feet in length on the crest: 47
feet thick on the base: 175 feet high,
and 8 feet thick on the top. The!
structure is of the constant radial
arch type and looks for all the world j
like a new moon. It will require sixty j
thousand barrels of cement and 50,
000 cubic yards of material to furn
ish the concrete entering into the big
wall. The first shipment of cement
will arrive iu a few days and it is ex
pected to commence pouring the con
.
crete within the next five weeks.
The dam has an elevation of 1.018
feet above sea level and will, when
completed form a lake of water a mi!e|
and three-quarters Ions, s:x hundred
feet wide, and one hundred and seven
ty-five feet deep. Half a mile in dis
tance down stream the lower dam at
the present time diverts and a flume
picks the water from the creek and;
delivers it at the penstock two miles
distant at a height of about four hun
dred feet. Here it plunges over the
bluff to the pelton wheels at Uie beach
power station, the first unit in the pow-1
er system that has been planned.
Transporting Materials.
The materials entering into the con
struction of this great work with the
exception of the sand and gravel are
all brought in scows to Salmon creek
and then hauled up the steep hill on
the incline tram. Here a little toy
engine which has been substituted
for horses takes the cars over the
miniature railroad to the point of ac
tivity. At the lower dam where the
water is now taken for the present
power station a stiff grade is encoun
tered and horses are still in use. but
a new engine arrived yesterday to re
place the horses on this section. Near
the lower dam a sawmil is kept busy
all the time cutting lumber that is
used in the construction work.
A large force of men must neces
sarily be employed in order to get the
desired results and the supplies ne
cessary to feed them must also be
transported over the line. The to
tal number of men employed on the
Salmon creek development at the pres
ent time is 200 but this force will prob
ably be increased soon.
o?o?o
NEW LAWYER ADMITTED
Arthur B. Callaham was this morn
ing admitted by Judge Jennings to
practice law in the District Court.
o?o?o
AUTO FOR HIRE.?Phone 3-1-4. Lf.
STRONG-TREADWELL
CASE ON TRIAL
In the case of H. C. Strong against
Alaska-Juneau Cold Mining Company
and R. A. Kinzie a hearing is being
is being held today before Judge R.
W. Jennings on the order to show
cause. Counsel for both plaintiff and
the defense made opening statements
and the plaintiff commenced putting in
testimony this morning. The suit in
volves the right of possession to cer
tain waterfront properties claimed by
both parties to the action, the title
to which each party claims through
Indian settlers.
The only witnesses examined up to
2:30 this afternoon were Jimmy Jack
son and Jennie Jackson, both Indians
testifying for plaintiff.
The plaintiff claims title through
purchase from Frank Booth, grand
son of one Amatina. an Indian, who it
is alleged, was the original settler
on the land in question. The defense
claims title through purchase from Ye
To-Colic. better known as Auk Bay
Jim. and a brother of Amatina. now
deceased. There was a hearing be
fore Judge P. D. Overtield on practi
cally the same issue, and the injunc
tion was denied, but the plaintiff
claims to have new evidence now. At
any rate the court house corridors
are flooded with natives and others
who will probably be called in the
case.
Among the well known characters
seen around the premises were Ye-To
Colic, or Auk Bay Jim, Sheep Creek
Mary, Mussel Shell Frank, Chief Ana
Ka-Thlash. Wes Waydelich, Jennie
Jackson and Jimmy Jackson.
H. Sakalof was sworn in as inter
pretor.
\J V V
GEORGE HAS DONE IT.
George Burford has opened a swell
new cigar store in front of the Heid
elberg Liquor Company's establish
ment. Any of George's bingles are
just as good at the new place as at the
famous amusement palace at Bur
ford's corner. He has beside a fine
assortment of goods, a machine that
will furnish just as many thrills as
either of the money-getters in the old
place.
o?o?o
ELKS. NOTICE
Regular meeting of Juneau Lodge,
No. 420, B. P. O. Elks, tonight.
E. C. JAMESON, Secy.
o?o?o
The Arctic Pocket Billiard Parlors
opens? Saturday night, corner Front
and Franklin streets. 6-4-4t.
o?o?o
Hotel Arctic, corner Front and Frank
lin streets, just opened and ready for
business. Everything new and clean.
Reasonable rates. Harry F. Caine,
proprietor. 6-4-tl
o?o?o
NO KICKS ON THE
ASSESSMENT ROLLS
The City Council sitting as a board
of equalization report that so far nc
serious objections have been found
with the assessment rolls as prepared
In some instances people have called
attention to discrepancies and has in
dicated that the assessments of neigh
bors should be increased, but those
asking for reductions are few. The
hearings will continue through the
week.
o?o?o
ORDERING NEW UNIFORMS
FOR THE BAND BOYS
The band boys are being measuree
and their new uniforms will be orderee
immediately. An effort will be made
to have the suits arrive in Juneau it
time to bo worn on July 4.
|must not govern I
alaska erom east
Former Gov. Walter E. Clark left
Seuttle for the East a week ago to
day. He spent two or three days atj
Seattle before departing. Before leav-j
ing he gave the Seattle Post-lntelligen-,
cer an interview in which he discussed
Alaska affairs, as follows:
"Gov. Strong will make Alaska a fine |
executive. Party lines are iusignlleant
in the North compared with the good'
of the country. And it is very essen-1
tial that the Governor of Alaska be in
close touch and have the hearty sup
port of the national administration at
Washington. I had that support dur
ing my service in the North. The pub
lic service of the North has been great- j
ly improved, 1 believe, and I worked to
that end. my recommendations being j
generally followed in appointing men !
to government positions. It is unfortu- >
nate that the Judiciary in the North ^
cannot be left alone, as the present
judges are men of high quality. I
trust the men supplanting them will
be equally good.
"The affairs of Alaska should be ad
ministered in Alaska, and not by de
partmental bureaus at Washington. I
was able to accomplish a good deal in
that direction. The powers granted to
the Alaska legislature, while limited,
tend greatly to self-government. The
first session, completed May 1, wrote
some valuable laws, and also provided
an ottlcial source which recommen
dations can be made to Congress. Four
members of the Alaska Senate will go
to Washington next winter to present
in person to Congress the memorials of
the Legislature. This will give those
recommendations much greater weight
than any private petitions.
Two Great Problems to Solve.
"Te two great problems of Alaska,
the railroad and transportation ques
tion and the coal question, remain un
settled. 1 am sorry to say I believe
that during my term as much was done
toward bringing them to a jusf set
tlement as was possible. With the co
operation of the national administra
tion. Gov. Strong is in a position to
press them to a favorable decision, so !
that development of the Territory may ?
go rapidly forward.
"Along some useful lines 1 was able >
to make good progress. The best of;
these was in getting lighthouses for the j
northern coast. About two hundred
lights have been established in the last
four years, and appropriations have al
ready been made for others.
Quartz Mining Most Active.
"The greatest development now un- j
der way in the North is in quartz min
ing in Southeastern Alaska. Juneau is
booming as never before. With the
building of railroads, the whole terri
tory will feel a great impetus of prog
ress. In many ways I am sorry to
leave the North, although I was more
than ready to lay down the duties of
the governorship."
NORTHWESTERN IN
FROM WESTWARD
The Northwestern arrived from the
Westward about 10 o'clock last night
and proceeded to the South. The fol-'
lowing passengers debarked at Ju-i
neau: Jack Dalton, S. H. Holland, 0. j
L. Coward, F. Tascher, Mrs. C. W.
McKay and family, J. McDonald.
o?0?0
EXCURSIONISTS GO
TO MARIAN ISLAND
Last evening the Alaska-Gastineau
Blue Devil and the customs house
launch took an excursion party to
Marian Island for a beefsteak dinner
on the beach. Charles D. Garfield and
John Wilcox were the moving spirits'
albeit the Garfield section of the ex
pedition refused to move of itself alone
and the Blue Devil towed the recalci
trants back to Juneau. A splendid
? time is reported by everybody.
o?o?o
PASSENGERS LEAVING
ON NORTHWESTERN
The Northwestern left last night for
the South carrying the following pas
' sengers from Juneau: Mrs. Peter Carl
son. Misses Nana and Vivian Carlson.
! Miss Selma Simando, Reese Bark,
' W. G. Beattie, wife and son, Mrs.
' Thompson, E. W. Allen, E. J1 Cad
" bury, S. R. Vereker, C. E. Robinson,
' N. L. Burton and wife, Mrs. W. E.
Nowell and children.
o?o?o
j WILL ENFORCE ORDINANCE NO 46
Mayor Carter announces that Ordi
nance No. 46. which provides that
permits must first be obtained be
> fore any portion of the streets may be
occupied for building purposes or
i otherwise, will have to be enforced
1 owing to the disposition of some peo
j pie to erect buildings and of others
i to block the streets with building ma
terial.
Republican Senator Says
Wilson Charges Justified
WASHINGTON, June 4. ? Senator i
William S. Kenyou, of Iowa, Republi
can, testifying before the Senate in
vestigating committee, yesterday af
ternoon said that the social lobbying
at Washington against the Underwood
tariff bill justified in fullest measure
every word that President Woodrow
Wilson had said regarding the insid-!
ious lobby at the National capital. He
said that such lobbying as is being
practiced is far more dangerous to
the country than would be attempts at
bribery because it is more diflicult
to reach and is motk effective because
its motion is disguised.
Investigators After Evidence.
WASHINGTON, June 4.? The Sen
ate committee that is investigating i
the lobby conditions at the National
capital have subpoenaed sixty wit
nesses that' have been identified as
being connected with the sugar inter
ests in the United States. Kepresen
tatlves of other interests will lie sub
poenaed.
?o?o?
Penrose Never Saw Lobby.
WASHINGTON, June 4. ? Senator
Poise Penrose, of Pennsylvania, testi
fying yesterday before the Senate com
mittee that is investigating the Wash
ington lobby, said that lie has never
known during the 10 years that lie
has been a member of the United
States Senate of any attempt 011 the
part of anybody to improperly influ
ence the members of 1 be Senate or
of the House of Representatives.
Activity of Thetis Arouses
Interest in California
OAKLAND, Calif; June 4. ? The
United States revenue cutter Thetis
is beiiiK hurriedly overhauled and pre
pared for sea. She will sail in a few
days under sealed orders which are
said to contain instructions to head
off a Meet of Japanese poachers that
are sweeping the Alaska coast in a
raid on the seal herds of that Terri
tory.
Not the Understanding Here.
The understanding in Juneau is tlmt
'the Thetis is coming North to take
i Judge Robert W. Jennings and the
other officers of the floating court to
the Westward. They are supposed to
sail from Valdez on the Thetis June
15th, and to remain on and hold court
on the vessel for the 60 days follow
ing that date.
?T I I I I I I I I ! I I I I I ill M i l l I I !?
- League Base Ball -
?Mini i -i-i.-i i-.i-i-.i
NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE.
Standing of Clubs.
Won Lost Pet.
Vancouver 27 18 .600
Seattle 28 19 .596
Portland 23 19 .548
Victoria 23 23 .500
Tacoma 19 28 .404
Spokane 18 31 .368
Yesterday's Games.
At Seattle?Seattle, 6; Spokane, 1.
At Vancouver?.Morning game: Tuco
ma, 4; Vancouver, 2. Afternoon
game: Tacoma. 4; Vancouver, 3.
At Victoria?Morning game: Victoria,
10; Portland, 5. Afternoon game:
Victoria, 8; Portland, 7.
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE.
Standing of Club6.
Won Lost Pet.
Los Angeles 36 24 .600
Oakland 31 27 .534
Venice 29 31 .4S3
Portland 26 30 .464
Sacramento 24 28 ? .461
San Francisco ... 28 33 .459
Yesterday's Scores.
At San Francisco?San Francisco, 3;
Venice, 2.
At Los Angeles?Los Angeles, 3; Sac
ramento, 1.
At Portland?Oakland, 8; Portland, 7.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Standing of Club6.
Won Lost Pet.
Philadelphia .... 30 10 .750
Cleveland 30 13 .698
Chicago 24 20 .545
Washington 22 19 .537
Boston 18 21 .462
Detroit 19 27 .417
St. Louis 19 29 .396
New York 9 30 .231
Yesterday's Scores.
At Washington ? Washington, 3; St.
Louis, 2.
At New York ? Cleveland, 8; New
York, 2.
At Philadelphia?Philadelphia. 7; De
troit, 3.
At Boston?Boston, 3; Chicago, 2.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Standing of Club6.
Won Lost Pet.
Philadelphia .... 23 11 .676
Brooklyn 21 16 .568
New York 21 16 .568
Chicago 21 20 .512
Pittsburgh 20 20 .500
St. Louis 19 23 .452
Boston 14 21 .400
Cincinnati 15 27 .357
Yesterday's Scores.
At St. Louis?New York, 5; St. Louis,
3.
At Cincinnati?Cincinnati, 1; Brook
lyn, 0.
At Pittsburgh?Pittsburgh, 7; Boston,
2.
0?0?0
The Daily Empire delivered in Ju
neau, Douglas and Treadwell for $1.00
a month.
MEXICAN REBELS
TAKE ANOTHER TOWN
BROWNSVILLE, Tex., June 4. ?
Mala moras, Mexico, was captured by
the Constitutionalists yesterday un
der the command of Gen. Lucio Blan
co. after severe fighting.
o?o?o
RAILWAY TRAINMEN
RE-ELECT LEE PRESIDENT
?o-o?
SAN FRANCISCO, June 4.?W. G.
Lee, of Cleveland, was re-elected yes
terday at president of the Brotherhood
of Railway Trainmen at the conven
tion in this city.
BULGAR MINISTRY
RESIGNS OFFICES'
?o-o?
LONDON, June 4.?The Bulgarian j
ministry resigned yesterday. Dissat-j
isfaction over the terms of the peace
treaty and the condition of the affairs
between Bulgaria and Greece and Ser
via is assigned as the cause for the
resignations.
0?o?o
SEATTLE SWEDISH LAWYER
MAY LOCATE IN ALASKA
D. J. Djerf, a Seattle lawyer and ed
itor, is a recent arrival in Juneau,
who is looking over Alaska with the
view of becoming interested in the
Territory, and possibly locating here.
Mr. Djerf has been editor of the
Swedish Press for the last two years
In addition to practicing law. Mr.
Djerf conies to Alaska with the high
est recommendations from leading
members of the Seattle bar and finan
cial institutions. He is registered at
the Orpheum hotel.
, o?o?o
PATENTS ISSUED
The local land office is in receipt
of patents for the following:
Henry Andes, a homestead near
Haines, consisting of 122 acres.
A soldiers' additional homestead at
Controller bay for James J. Ryan, con
sisting of'160 acres. This is the last
of the three Ryan claims that were to
be admitted to patent.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
I received one of the famous Bitzer
Dry Cleaning Machines and Extrac
tors on the Alameda and will in a few
days be equipped to do all kinds of
ladies' and men's dry cleaning.
I have secured the services of a first
class tailor and am now prepared to
do all kinds of ladies' and men's re
pairing and alterations. The best
work and quickest services in Juneau
guaranteed. I do not dye. White help
only.
MILT BOTH WELL
Second Street
1 Between Seward and Franklin
Phone 3-0-4 Free Delivery
Jones Expects Railway bill
to Pass Senate at Once
WASHINGTON, June 4.?Senator
Wesley L. Jones, of Washington, said
last night that there is a splendid
chance that the Alaska railroad bill
will go through the Senate at the spe
cial session, lie says if the President
will say the word there is no doubt
but that the House will have the hill j
at this session in time for it to be
come a law before the middle of the
present summer.
The statement that the President
has requested that the Secretary of
the Interior ask Congress to take the
Alaska railroad bill up at the present i
session was reiterated last night on
what is believed to be good authority.
?o-o?
House Committee Gets Busy.
WASHINGTON. June 4?The House
committee on territories held a spe
cial meeting last night to consider the
Alaska railroad measures. The ob
ject of the meeting was to get a bill
through the Senate at the special ses
sion if possible. It was decided to
hold another meeting July 4th for
the consideration of plans to press the
passage of the bill. The date was set
in anticipation of the passage of the
bill by the Senate this month.
Great Northern President
Hits Reclamation Service
ONTARIO, Ore., June 4. ? Louis
W. Hill, president of the Great North
ern, in an address here yesterday, re
ferred to the administration of F. H.
Newell as director of reclammatlou
as a failure. He said that his retell
I tion at the head of the service is a
I "National calamity."
CABINET CONSIDERS TRUST PROBLEMS
WASHINGTON, June 4.?The Cabi
net yesterday at the regular meeting
devoted considerable time to a discus
sion as to whether or not the Supreme
I Court decrees dismembering the Stan
dard Oil Company and the Tobacco
trust are being carried out to the let
ter.
EOODSTUEES ARE BACK ON FREE LIST
WASHINGTON, June 4.?The sub
committee of the Senate finance com
mittee, that is considering the sciied
ules dealing with them, has decided to
put live-stock, wheat and oats on the
tree list again. The change is made
to meet the views of the President.
TIM SULLIVAN
IS RECOVERING
?o-o?
NEW YORK, June 4.?Represents- i
live Timothy D. Sullivan, of the 13th
New York Congressional District, and
theatrical magnate, has so nearly re
[ covered from his recent serious ill
ness that he is planning a trip to Eu
I rope.
o?o?o
Jury Exonerates
Spokane's Cook's Wife
?o-o?
SEATTLE, June 4.?A coroner's jury |
rhis morning exonerated Mrs. Jennie I
Perry, wife of the cook of the Alaska
liner Spokane, for shooting and kill
ing Louise Periea, cook on the steam
ship Senator.
n?n?n??
SPECTACULAR
SUICIDE AT SEATTLE
?o-o?
SEATTLE, June 4. ? One of the
most spectacular tragedies ever en
acted in Seattle occurred this morn
ing when Robert Carr Cook commit
ted suicide by jumping from the roof
of the Pioneer building at the corner
of Cherry street and First avenue.
He never regained consciousness. The
dead man had been suffering of rheu
matism.
o?o?0
ROSE WINS LOS ANGELES
ELECTION FOR MAYOR
LOS ANGELES, June 4. ? Police
Judge Henry H. Hose was elected May
or of Los Angeles Tuesday.
o?o?o '
CANADA CELEBRATES
BIRTHDAY OF KING
VANCOUVER. B. C., June 4.?The
birthday of King George V. was gen
erally celebrated throughout the Do
minion yesterday. There were appro
priate ceremonies at Vancouver and
Victoria.
o?o?o
PENNSYLVANIA WOMAN
SEEKS LOST BROTHER
The Rev. Father E. H. Brown has
received an inquiry from a devoted sis
ter seeking knowledge of the where
abouts of Thomas Quinan, who is be
lieved to be in Alaska. Quinan was
formerly a resident of Mahanoy City,
Pennsylvania.
?
PRISCO COLLECTOR
MUST STEP DOWN
?o-o?
WASHINGTON, June 4.?Secretary
of the Treasury William G. McAdoo
yesterday asked for the resignation of
Collector of Customs Frederick S.
Stratton, of San Francisco.
JAPAN MAKES
REPLY TO BRYAN
WASHINGTON, June 4?Japan's re
ply to Secretary of State William J.
Bryan's answer to the Japanese pro
test over the California legislation was
delivered to Mr. Bryan today. The
Japanese government contends that
the Webb law is discriminatory though
general in its tone. The reply invites
further discussion of the law.
o?o?o
KING'S HORSE KILLS
WOMAN AT DERBY
EPSOM DOWNS, England, Juen 4.
?Miss Elizabeth Davidson, suffra
gette, seized the reins of Aumer, the
King's horse in the Derby race, when
it was runnig at top speed. The wom
an was fatally injured. The horse
fell and the jockey dangerously hurt.
o?o?o
SENATOR LA FOLLETTE HAS
REGAINED HIS HEALTH
WASHINGTON, June 4. ? Senator
Robert M. La Follette's health, lost a
year ago, has been regained and his
eyes are bright, his face is rosy and
his spirit is up.
"I a in ready for any sort of decent
fight," said Mr. La Follette today. "I
feel younger and fitter than for sev
eral years." ?
o?o?o
MONTANA PUGILIST DROWNS
IN TUOLUMME RIVER
STOCKTON, June 4.?Edward Bar
ry, the Montana pugilist, was drowned
yesterday in the Tuolumme river,
California.
o?o?o
WOMAN SHOOTS HUSBAND
WHO C0URT8 ANOTHER
ST. LOUIS, Mo., June 4.?Mrs. Hel
en B. Martin shot and killed her hus
band, Charles L. Martin, a prominent
automobile dealer yesterday. She ac
cused her husband of having paid
too much attention to another woman.

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