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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 06, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
JOHN W. TROY, Editor.
? "? ~9
Telephone No. 3-7-4
tutored as secoud-class matter November 7, 191- at the postolllce at Ju
ueau. Alaska, uuder the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
year, by mail $10.00 j
Six mouths, by mail 5.00
Per mouth, delivered 1-OW
IN A STATE OF SOMNOLENCE
DGLGCiA FE JAMES WICKERSHAM is quoted as saying that
the Alaska railroad bill, now before Congress, is strictly an
administration measure. This statement was made before
the House committee on territories. The Delegate added that
the House would be called upon to act upon the bill before the
Senate returns the taritl bill to the House.
We hope that Delegate Wickersham has the correct view of
the situation. President Wilson undoubtedly favors the immed
iate passage of the railroad bill, but whether the House will re
cede from its determination not to take up any other legisla
tion except the taritl and currency, is problematical.
There is no substantial reason why the Alaska railroad bill
should not be passed at the special session. The House, since it
passed the taritl bill, has been "marking time," for the most
part, and it will continue to do so until the bill is returned to it.
This probably will be several weeks hence and in the interim the
House will accomplish practically nothing.
The Alaska railroad bill is neither a voluminous nor a com
plex measure, and if a few days' consideration were given it then
should be 110 legit mate reasons to prevent its passage. Bills ap
propriating many more millions than this bill asks for have been
passed with scant discussion. Why then this procrastination in
a matter of such vital importantce, not to Alaska alone, but to a
considerable portion of the Nation?
The House should wake up to the importance of Alaska and
its pressing problems. And it is to be hoped that President \\ il
son will arouse it from its apparent indifference. Alaska has
endured the somnolence of Congress long enough.
The standing of the teams: C. W. Young Company?won
2; lost. 1; per cent won, .bG7. Alaska-Gastineau?won, 1; lost,
2; per cent won, A pretty long lead in the percentage table,
but there are several months of the season yet; and the applica
tion ot the rule "more work and less talk" has been known to
work wonders.
A QUAKER ALTRUISTIC PROPHET
THE Philadelphia North American, a Progressive newspaper,
thinks that the "beginning of a new era freighted with vast
significance for the entire nation" has been quietly ushered
in, in Alaska. Like most ot the Eastern newspapers, of whatso
ever political complexion, however, the North American fails to
grasp Alaska conditions, although its good intentions are not to
be doubted. And. therefore, while deploring its lack of accu
rate information, and its reasoning from false premises, its hon
est advocacy of what it believes is for the best interests of Alas
ka and the nation, is sincere and will serve to direct renewed
attention to Alaska's needs and anomalous conditions.
The Philadelphia paper sees mountainous possibilities in the
Alaska coal tields, as witnesses this:
? ? -- ? 4 T
"Bui the coal of Alaska is no subject of conjecture, lat
erally, mountains of it crowd the water's edge. To dig it out
of the ground, to shoot it into great boats built for the trade,
to carry these through the Panama Canal, to dump the coal on
the wharves of Charleston, or Boston, or New York, or Phila
delphia?who can measure the meaning of that to the man who
now pays $7.50 a ton to the coal trust, and whose only protec
tion against further extortion is the inexhaustible supply of coal
in Alaska, still the property of the people of the United States."
And the North American then dips into the future far as
human eyes can see, and concludes:
"The tight that the people of Alaska have made comes close
to every home in the land. It will mean, when its fruits will
have been gathered, the difference between monopoly and compe
tition, between extortion and just prices, between exorbitant
wealth for a few, and honest comfort for the millions. In thous
ands of families it may mark the line between the pinch of want
and the assurance of a decent sufficiency. It may keep a million
boys out of the factories until they are old enough to enter the
battle of life. It may keep a million girls in school and at home
to learn the duties of wifehood and motherhood?girls who oth
erwise would be wearing out their young lives over inexorable
factory machines."
Let the negotiations over that California problem proceed.
It would be too bad to deprive those Japanese statesmen of even
a talking interest in the proposition.
SITTING STEADILY IN THE BOAT
NOTWITHSTANDING the testimony of those Senators that
professed ignorance of the presence of an anti-tariff bill
lobby at Washington, the investigation committee of Sen
ators, at the head of which is the amiable Overman, of North
Carolina, have found that the facts fully justify the charges thai
was made by President Wilson when he said that probably the
most remarkable lobby that ever assembled at the National cap
ital is busy in an attempt to cheat the people out of the result*
of the last election.
The manner in which events always sustain the observation*
and conclusions of the President suggest that the head of th(
Nation is sitting steadily in the boat, and that he has perfect con
trol of the sheets and helm all the time. Also, he seems to knou
just when to turn the searchlight on would-be scuttlers and pir
atical free-booters in order to get the best results.
At the worst Jack Johnson will have a year of the simph
life, and that works well in connection with the processes ol
"coming back."
On the Run. 1
The running-for-offlce habit is so
strong with some politicians that if I
they happened to get into heaven, bj
mistake, they'd soon be in the rac<
for keeper of the gate.
I i 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
I WILL MOVE IN A FEW DAYS TO MY I
NEW STORE BUILDING
? ? On the Corner of , ,
!! FRANKLIN & FERRY STREETS jj
If I CHARICK
:: JL* ? KJ JEWELER & OPTICIAN j|
??????? ?? I I I I t U1 I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I | | | I I I I I I H t I I
I I I I I I ?? 1 I r .
EDUCATIONAL NOTES
?o-o?
Over y per cent of the high schools:
in the United States have libraries, ac
cording to ligures compiled by E. D j
i.iroonman, of the United States I>u-lt
reau of Education.
The "school republic" or "school
city" has been introduced into thejj
Alaska native schools by order of the
United States Commissioner of Edu
cation, for the purpose of preparing ,
the natives for citizenship.
Seventeen hundred children in Day
ton. Ohio, tilled backyard gardens. ,
each 10 by 25 feet, last year, under1
the supervision of the Dayton Parks
and Playgrounds Association, and not |
i only provided fresh vegetables for (
! home use. but in many cases sold the
produce for enough to buy textbooks
and other school supplies.
In a recent comparison between pu- |
pils in a closed-window schoolroom
and those in an open-winodw room
in Philadelphia, it was found that the
open-window class surpassed the oth
ers in almost every test. The tern- (
perature of the closed schoolroom av
eraged 6S degrees, while for the open
window room it was 47 degrees.
O?0?0
One Result. ,
Some most depressing rain we've had; J
We almost had some sleighing.
It made a bunch of rooters sad
Liecause no games were playing.
1
The rooter should ignore the rain
And be a patient waiter.
For early rain, as it is plain, I
Me ans double-headers later.
SJ u V
Waffles all day at "TT and I" Lunch
Room. 4-141m. j
In the United States Commissioner's '
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct. |
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus- i
tav Tesch, deceased. <
NOTICE is hereby given that the (
undersigned has been, by the United
States Commissioner, Probate Judge (
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint- i
ed administrator of the estate of Gus- i
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav- ,
ing claims against said estate are
hereby notified to preseut them, with |
the proper vouchers and in legal form, .
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
. Dated this 5th day of April, 11)13.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator
Meeting Board Equalization
NOTICE is hereby given that the ;
Common Council of the City of Ju
neau will meet as a Board of Equal
ization on Tuesday June 3, 1913, in
the Council Chamber, Third and
Franklin streets at the hour of two
p. m. and will continue in session un
til the hour of four p. m. of said day
and will continue in session until the
.Monday next following between the
hours of two and four p. m. of each
day for the purpose of equalizing the
assessments of property in the City
of Juneau for .Municipal taxes for the
year 1913.
Witness my hand and the olficial
seal of the City of Juneau this 28th
day of May, 1913.
(Seal) W. T. LUCAS,
Municipal Clerk of the
City of Juneau, Alaska.
May 28. 29, 30: June 3, 4. and 5.
"iwiwr ADD! IP.ATION NO. 01602 !
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, May 15, 1913.
Notice is hereby given that the Alas
ka-Gastineau Mining Company, a cor
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New York,
and qualified to do and doing business
as a corporation in Juneau, Alaska,
has made application for patent to the
Gastineau Millsite, Survey No. 990,
in the Harris Mining District, Juneau
Land District, District of Alaska, de
. scribed as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at Corner No. 1 identi
[ cal with location corner and with Cor
ners Nos. 2, 4 and 3 of Perseverance
No. 4 lode, Perseverance No. 3 lode
t and Perseverance Placer, all of Sur
. vey No. 605 respectively, whence U.
' S. L. M. No. 2 bears N. 59? 10' 51" W.
1 1S92.0S feet distant, thence N. 24? 30'
E. (Var. 34 E.) 761 feet to Corner No.
* 2; thence S. 39? 30' E. (Var. 31? 30' E.)
; 213.47 feet to Corner No. 3; thence S.
40? 28' W. (Var. 31? 30' E.) 694.07
feet to Corner No. 1, the place of be
; ginning. Containing an area of 1.674
4 acres.
The names of the adjoining claims
- are Perseverance No. 3 lode (pat
ented), Perseverance Placer (patent
' ed), Martin lode( unpatented), all be
- longing to the Alaska-Gastineau Min
ing Company, and the Solo lode claim
(unpatented) belonging to Jesse
Blakely, Esquire.
The location notice of the Gastineau
2 mill site is recorded in Book 11 of
P Placers, at page 106 of the records of
c the Recorder for the Juneau Record
ing Precinct, District of Alaska.
This notice was posted on the ground
the 15th day of May, 1913.
p First publication, May 16, 1913.
Last publication, July 18, 1913.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
POINTED PAllAGRPHS
And many an ought-to-be man isn't.
* * *
Tho mule bus ligured in Ibo uplift
>f many u man.
* * ?
A pretty girls knows enough palm
stry to hold hands.
? ? ?
You can't judge the quality of llie
Jinner by the tone of the bell.
* * *
.Money a man has saved represents
he good times he didn't have.
* * *
And some ineu are as anxious to
:uvak into type as others are to stay
nit.
* * *
The lifelong regret of certain people
s that they were not there to give
ITovidence a few pointers when this
>ld world was in the making.
* * *
When .Misery is comin' up the road
what a pity it is we never recognize
lim in time to take to the woods.
o?0?o
Too Good to Lose.
"Your husband is willing to allow
vou the custody of the automobile the
?oodle and the rubber plant, with lib
?nil alimony, while he takes the chil
Jren and the grapliaphoue."
"Stop the divorce," sobbed the wife.
'I'll never get another husband like
:hat."
o?o?o
A complete line of tobacco jars and
>ipo racks at BUKFOUD'S.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
TO L. A. Moore, lierta Jartny and
Fred Stevenson: You and each of you,
ire hereby notified that you co-owner
the undersigned, have performed all
the necessary labor as required by Sec
Lion 2324 United Suites Revised Stat
utes and the amendments thereto ap
proved January 22ud, 1880, concern
ing annual labor upon mining claims, |
upon the Sum Dum group of placer
claims and upou the Duck creek group
jf placer claims, for the year ending !
December 31st, 11412, for the purpose j
jf holding said claims;
And unless you, within ninety days
after the first publication of this no
tice, pay your proportion of the cost
of said annual labor as required by
law, and the cost of this notice, your i
interest in said group or groups of
said claims will, in accordance with
law, become the property of the un
dersigned; the proportion to be paid'
by L. A. Moore, holding one eighth in
terest in each group is ?25.60, and the
cost of this notice; the proportion to
be paid by Berta Jarma is $12.70,
and the cost of this notice, holding
one-eighth interest in the Sum Dum:
group; and the proportion to be paid
by Fred Stevenson, holding one-eighth
interest in the Sum Dum group is
$12.70, and the cost of this notice;
Said claims being located in the
Harris mining district, near Power's
creek, and about six miles from the
Postofflce at Sum Dum, Territory of
Alaska; and recorded in book eleven
(XI.) on pages 51 and 52 of Placer
records, on the 5th day of February,
A. D., 1912, in the the office of the Ju
neau Recording District.
First publication March 8, 1913, last
publication June 8, 1913.
ANDREW JOHNSON, j
Professional Cards
J. B. MARSHALL
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
114 Decker Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
.
H
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Robertson
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska 1
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor j
U. S. Mineral Surveyor I -!
M
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau H
_ "
N. WATANABE i
<
DENTIST <
| <
Office Over Purity Pharmacy *
Juneau ? - ? Alaska }
:
JOHN B. DENNY <
' <
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW |<
Mining and Corporation Law <
Offices: Juneau, Alaska <
Seattle, Wash. j
<
Dr. J. S. Harrison
DENTIST
Kooins 106-107 Decker llldg. j
'Phone 2-0-5 Juneau, Alaska j
W. H. Cl.KVKI.ANO P. J. CL.KVKI.ANI> J
Contractors-Builders :
Estimates Furnished Free Upon "
Request 11
Good Mechanics, Good Material, ?
Best Results "
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU ;
H. W. AVERILL >
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts. *
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m. <
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. <
'PHONE?209 <
I <
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer j
S. S. GEORGIA ]
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juncuu for r'iiut . t. i t
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, ,;>p?r.:n.
Tenakee, Killlsnoo, ChatliH n mi,<i
Sitka 8:00 a. in. April -i. Hi. id.
22, 28; May 4. lu, 16. 2*.
June 3, 9, 15, 21, 27; July 1. x <
15, 21, 27; August 2 ?. !? ?
26; September 1. 7, 16. I *
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
BaranofT Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28tk, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 25th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove, !
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
St'a., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2, 8, 14, 20, 26; June 1, 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1, 7. 13. 19, 25, 31; Au
gust 6, 12, 18, 24, 30; September
5, 11. 17, 23, and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL. MANAGER
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swnnson, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK JUNE 12
Front and Seward St a, C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK ETT, Asrt.
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
Tin- Alnxkm Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Alunka Flyer
NORTHBOUND JUNE 14
SOUTHBOUND JUNE 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BUR FORD, Agent
? ? ? i r t f, t UJJJAhH.
i i I-I-i r i
ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety, Service, Speed Ticket* to Seattle, Tncomn. Victoria and Vancouver. inrouKii t
ticket* to Sun Franciaco T
? JEFFERSON Northbound ....MAY 31 Southbound... .JUN E 1 T
I JEFFERSON Northbound JUNE 13 Southbound . .JUNE 14 J
; MARIPOSA Northbound JUNE 9 Southbound ..JUNE 18 1
; NORTHWESTERN Southbound JUNE 3 f
! NORTHWESTERN Northb'd...JUNE 15 Southbound . .JUNE 22 +
" Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt, WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. 1
H-H-H-l-l- l-I- l-I ?!? M. I'M I 1 1 I I I I I 1 I 1 1.1.1 I II I 1 I II 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1
? WL I /~V rVTI I | ? ft I rv Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
? I rlLAINU w,th juneau Tran8fer c?- t
/->, | ? John Henson, Douglas Agent ?
\ Steamship Company ?
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU ?
Southbound Sailings S.S. ALKI, - June 14 I
17 i. C 1.1.I First Class $19.00 I
rare to ocattle second ciass $12.00 *
Ill I I H II I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I It I
I ALASKA COAST CO. ;j
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
! S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 18 ||
I S. S. YUKON JUNE 29 ; ;
I SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ;;
; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 6 ?
? S. S. YUKON MA ?'
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. . ,
| S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
I I I M I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I II II I I II I
? PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. II
f SKATTLE. TACOMA, ij
? Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townaend, <?
? South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, <>
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. **
? C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
| 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle o
? ?
J S. S. SPOKANE North June 5 South June 6 r
I CITY OF SEATTLE North June 11-24 South June 12-27 2
J Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt.
J
SUMMER FERRY TIME SCHEDULE STARTING MAY 26, 1913.
Boat Leaves Juneau
For Douitlas nnd
Trend well
6:30 a. in.
8:00 a. m.
0:00 a. in.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. ni.
2:00 p. in.
3:00 p. m.
5:00 p. in.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. in.
9:30 p. in.
11:00 d. in.
Leave* Treadwell For
DoukIuh anil
Juneau
7: lu a. in.
8:25 a. in.
i>: 40 a. m.
11:25 a. m.
1:25 p. in.
2:25 p. in.
3:25 p. m.
5:40 p. m.
0:55 p. ni.
8:25 p. na.
9:55 p. in.
11:25 p. ra.
DoukIum For
Juneau
7:15 a. in.
8:30 a. in.
3:45 a. in.
11:30 a. in.
1:30 p. m.
2:30 p. in.
3:30 p. in.
5:45 p. in.
7:00 p. in.
8:30 p. m.
10:00 p.- in.
11:30 p. m.
IA-avi'X Shwji Crtvk
For Tread well Douglas
ami Juneau
7:00 a. m.
?: :i0 a. m.
5:30 p. m.
SHEEP CREEK TRIPS
Leaves Juneau for
Sheep Creek
6:30 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
5:00 p. m.
Leaves Douglas for
Sheep Creek
6:45 a. m.
9:15 a. m.
5:15 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
for Sheep Creek
6:50 a. in.
9:20 a. m.
5:20 p. in.
On Saturday and Wednesday nights 11 p. m. trip win go to snoop ereeK.
Leaving Treadwell for Juneau at 11:40 p. in.; leaving Douglas for Juneau
at 11:45 p. m.
We Are {Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
%
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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