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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 11, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
JOHN W. TROY, Editor.
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Kutered as secoud-class matter November 7, 1D13 at the postotlice at Ju
ueau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 13711.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
year, by mail $10.00 i
Six months, by mail 5.00 i
Per month, delivered 1.00
110LSE LEAVES LOOPHOLE FOR ALASKA
LATER anil more complete accounts show that the Democrat
ic House caucus let t a good-sized loophole tor the Alaska
question when it decided that nothing out the tariff, cur
rency and emergency appropriations should be considered at this
session ot' Congress. It provided that any matter specially asked
for by the President might be taken up.
With the caucus decision in view, those that are interested
in Alaska matters are trying to secure the early passage of the
Alaska bill by the Senate, and then they will seek to have the
President ask the House to pass the bill. That would auto
matically place it on the House program.
Now let us pray that the Senate will get busy quickly.
In appointing Hermon \V. Craven, of Seattle, to be a mem-'
ber of the federal civil service commission President Wilson se
cured for his administration the services of one of the ablest
and best citizens of the Northwest. .Mr. Craven is a lawyer of
learning, an orator ot talent and a public-spirited citizen who is,
always at the service of those who are devoting time and energy
to the improvement of conditions in his city. In fact, he is usual
ly a leader in up-lift movements there.
WORKING FOR THE COMMON GOOD
SPEAKER COLLINS, of the House of Representatives, shows
the right spirit. He would try to inoculate the people of
Alaska with the work-together idea. It cannot be denied suc
cessfully that this is needed. The unification of Alaska would
be a long step forward in the work of obtaining for the Territory
that recognition which is so essential to its progress and pros
perity. Of course this is a big country. It is so vast that the
people of the different geographical sections are practically
strangers to each other. It has been urged that because of this
wide separation, geographically, there is little or nothing in com
mon between them. This is not the case. The people of the dif
ferent divisions are all interested in the common welfare of
Alaska. Or. if they are not they should be, and the time to be
gin the cultivation of the spirit of unity is now. The establish
ment of a territorial legislature has been the means of bringing
the people of the four judicial divisions closer together. It has
laid the foundation for a better understanding of the needs of
each and of its people. And now in order to reap the fullest ad
vantage of a closer union the spirit of mutual helpfulness must
be still further developed. Why should the people of one section
of Alaska selfishly disregard the appeals of another for help,
aid or encouragement? The injury of one should be the concern
of all. The prosperity of all should unite all in a common pur
pose. There is room for all and opportunity for all.
The building of a railroad to the interior country will bene
fit all Alaska. It will promote friendly intercourse and develop
trade and commerce while opening up new and potentially rich
virgin regions. Therefore let everybody help to spread unity of
purpose and unselfish individual effort on the part of all Alas
kans to work together for the common good.
It is not disparagement of any of those who were his com
petitors to say that President Wilson made an excellent appoint
ment when he selected Fred M. Brown, of Valdez, to be Judge
of the United States District Court for the Third Judicial Di
vision. .Mr. Brown is a pioneer of Alaska, a lawyer of excellent
capabilities, a good man and the friend of all that know him.
LET US HOPE FOR PEACE
____
IT WILL cause genuine sorrow throughout the civilized world
if the Balkan Alries, thai have won a glorious victory in a war
as just as any that ever was fought, cannot arrange a set
llement of the differences of opinions and conflict of ambitions
arising out of that contest without resorting to fratricidal war.
The perfection of a combination of these little Nations to battle
a traditional enemy of their people and of Christianity and the
manner in which they conducted the war for righteousness that
followed won for them the admiration of the civilized world.
They have, apparently eliminated the Turks as factors in Euro
pean affairs, a thing that more pretentious Nations had been
striving in vain to accomplish for centuries. It will be too bad
if they fall to fighting among themselves, and in that way lose
the opportunity that is theirs to re-establish the prestige of a
people that had the keeping of civilization in its babyhood days.
Let us hope that reason will displace passion in the land of an
cient Macedonia while it is yet time to avoid further bloodshed.
The publication of the testimony in the Roosevelt case,
wherein the various kinds of cocktails, mint julips and other
American drinks have been mentioned, has caused much amuse
ment in Britain. It has set the English newspapers at work pre
paring "glossaries" of American drinks wherein the ingredients
of the various mixtures are set forth and the manner of their
making described. It is affording our British cousins much
amusement.
Mrs. George F. Cotter; 11. wife of the Mayor of Seattle, is
serving on the June panel of the jury in the Superior Court of
King County. She declined to exercise her right to be excused,
preferring to perform her duties as a citizen in accordance with
her conception of them.
It is said that there are no swear words in Esperanto. Is
that the reason that the traveling public is so slow to adopt it?
ALASKA INTERIOR
EXPERIENCES HOT SUN
SEATTLE. June 5.?Real summery
weather came ye6terdav to Alaska.
Tanana leads for high temperatures
in the weather bureau's reports, the
thermometer registering 80 degrees
last evening, with Eagle boasting 76.
Valdez came next with 74. Sitka 70
and Nome last with 58 degrees.
< i M M n i ii 11111111111 ii 1111 ii i ii 111 M 1111111 n111111
I WILL MOVE IN A FEW DAYS TO MY I
NEW STORE BUILDING
? ? On the Corner of , ,
I! FRANKLIN & FERRY STREETS jj
11 I QHARICK!
:: !? ? k/ JEWELER & OPTICIAN j:
1111111111 n 1111 ii 11111111111111111 ii 111 ? 11 ii ii 111111
FOREST SERVICE BOATS
ON WAY TO NORTH
?O-u?
Ranger No. 1. Ranger No. 2, and
Ranger No. ;5. launches for the United
Slates forestry service which were re
cently completed at the l'uget Sound
navy yard, Ureuierton. for service in
Alaska, are past due at Ketchikan. The]
vtssels are In charge of Capt. Lyle|
lilodgett, of the forestry service. They
are 35 feet long, nine feet beam and
equipped with 20-horse power Union1
engines. The three rangers were
given their trial voyages before sail
ing North and proved to be all that
is (laimed for them.
o?o?o
FAMOUS JAIL BREAKER
OUT AN1) IN AGAIN
ROCK ISLAND, 111., June 11.?Clyde
Stratton, the notorious jail-breaker,
who recently escaped from Leaven
worth penitentiary by crawling sever
al blocks through a tifteen-inch sewer
pipe and was arrested in this town
only to break jail again, has been re
captured. Stratum's record includes
two escapes from the Ohio State peni- j
tentiarv, the last of which was accom
plished by a journey through a sewer
pipe, the same as at Leavenworth. He
was arrested by the Chicago police
j last fall in connection with a murder i
i there.
serial uidis.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
I
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, May 19, 1913.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
the Hawk Pish Company, of Seattle,
Washington. assignee of Edward Ding
ley, being entitled to the benefits of
Section 2306, Rev. Stat, of the United
States, granting additional lands to
soldiers and sailors who served in the
war of the Rebellion, has made appli
cation to make entry of the lands em
braced in U. S. Surveys Nos. 793, 796
and 799, on east side of Hawk Inlet
and east side of Chatham strait, non-j
contiguous tracts, and more particu-!
larly described as follows, to-wit:
Survey No. 793.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1. a stone |
showing 3x3x2 above ground marked
Mi C. on side facing water, from which
U. S. I,. M. No. 793 bears S. 12? 29'I
W. 90.30 chains: thence with a var.
30? 30' E. along mean high tide line:
of Hawk Inlet N. 5 41' E. 2.94 chains;
thence N. 7? 55' W. 3.77 chains; thencei
N. 39? 43' E. 1.97 chains; thence N. i
S4? 56' E. 1.25 chains; thence N. 43?
56' \V. 9.71 chains: thence N. 32? 22'
\V. 8.73 chains to Cor. No. 2, a stone
3x4x1 marked S. 793 C. 2 and M. C.
on side facing water; thence E. 14.07;
chains to Cor. No. 3. a stone 22x10x5
in. set 15 in. in ground, marked S.
793 C. 3; thence S. 22.6S chains to
Cor. No. 4. a stone 20x12x12 in. set 15
in. in ground, marked S. 793 C. 4;
thence W. 4.93 chains to Cor No. 1,
the place of beginning. Containing
an area of 16.S3 acres. Var. 30? 30'
E.
This survey is situated on the east!
side of Hawk Inlet, about 2 miles from
the entrance.
Survey No. 796.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1. a stone
4x4x2 feet above ground, marked M.
C. on side facing water, from which
U. S. I,. M. No. 796 bears S. 14? 5S'
W. 2.03 chains distant; thence de
flecting from the true meridian along
the line of mean high tide of Chat
ham strait N. 27" 27' W. 4.59 chains;
thence N. 39? 43' \V. 11.28 chains;
thence N. 39? 43' W. 3.31 chains to
Cor No. 2, a stone Sx5x3 feet above
ground, marked S. 796 C. 2; thence E.
var. 30? 30' E. 13.66 chains, to Cor. No.
3, a stone 20x10x8 in. set 15 in. in
ground, marked S. 796 C. 3. B. T.;
thence S. 12.82 chains to Cor. No. 1.
the place of beginning. Containing an
area of 7.88 acres. Var. 30" 30' E.
This survey is situated on the east
side of Chatham strait about 2 miles
south of Point Marsden.
Survey No. 799.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1, a stone 7x
4x3, marked M. C. on side facing wa
ter. with X on top. from which U. S.
L. M. No. 799 bears S. 47? 01' E.I
00.19 chains distant; thence var. 30?
30' E. along the mean high tide line
of Chatham strait N. 69? 23' W. 4.69
chains; thence N. 49? 00' W. 2.C8
chains; thence N. 57? 38' W. 6.26
chains to Cor Cor No. 2, a stone in
place 6x5x3 feet, marked S. 799 C. 2
with M. C. on side facing water; thence
N. 11.92 chains to Cor. No. 3, thence
S. 6.83 chains to Cor No. 1, the place
of beginning. Containing an area of
4.46 acres. Var. 30? 30' E.
This survey is situated on the east
side of Chatham strait about 5 miles
north of Hawk Inlet.
As additional to Homestead Entry
No. 52 made by Edward Dingley, at
Falls St.. Croix. Wis., Oct. 18, 1865. for
E. Vi of S. W. y4 Sec. 32. T. 23 N. H.
14 W. 4th P. M.
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely any portion of the above de
scribed tracts are required to file with
the Register and Receiver of the U. S.
1.and Office at Juneau, Alaska, their
adverse claim thereto, under oath, dur
ing the period of publications or with
in thirty days thereafter, or they will
be barred by provisions of the statute.
HAWK FISH COMPANY
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, that the
foregoing notice be published for the
statutory period in the Daily Alaska
Empire, a newspaper printed and pub
lished at Juneau. Alaska.
C. B. WALKER.
Register.
First date of publication June 11,
1913.
I^ast date of publication August 10,
1913.
HATS AND SHOES
TO HE (ilVEN AWAY
?o-o?
Following n custom long established
in our store we will GIVE AWAY to
each purchaser of a suit of clothes be
tween now and the Fourth of July
his choice of a hat or pair of dress
shoes FREE OF COST. That is to'
suy, buy a suit of clothes and select
your choice from the hats or dress
shoes in our stock. You pay for the
clothes only, the other costs you not a!
cent. ("HAS. GOLDSTEIN, tf
o?o?o
The Lovera Monarch is the popu
lar bit size. *** |
o?o?o
Clam chowder every day at "U and
1" Lunch Room. 4-14-lm. |
In the United States Commissioner's
Court for the District of Alaska,
Div. No. 1, Yakutat Precinct.
?o-o?
In Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned has been, by the United !
States Commissioner, Probate Judge]
of the above entitled court, by an or
der duly made and entered, appoint
ed administrator of the estate of Gus
tav Tesch, deceased. All persons hav
iug claims ugainst said estate are
hereby notified to present them, with
the proper vouchers and in legal form,
within six (6) months from the date
of this notice, to the undersigned, at
his residence at Yakutat, Alaska.
Dated this 5th day of April, 191J.
FRANK R. BIGFORD
Administrator
MINING APPLICATION NO. 01602
?o-o?
United States Land Office, Juneau,1
Alaska, May 15, 1913.
Notice is hereby Riven that the Alas
ka-Gastineau Mining Company, a cor
poration organized and existing under
the laws of the State of New York, j
and qualified to db and doing business
as a corporation. in Juneau, Alaska,
has made application for patent to the
Gastineau Millsite, Survey No. 990.
in the Harris Mining District, Juneau
Land District, District of Alaska, de
scribed as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at Corner No. 1 identi
cal with location corner and with Cor
ners Nos. 2, 4 and 3 of Perseverance
No. 4 lode, Perseverance No. 3 lode
and Perseverance Placer, all of Sur
vey No. 605 respectively, whence U
S. L. M. No. 2 bears N. 59? 10' 51" W.
1892.08 feet distant, thence N. 24? 30'
E. (Var. 34 E.) 761 feet to Corner No.
2; thence S. 39? 30' E. (Var. 31? 30' E.)
213.47 feet to Corner No. 3; thence S.
40? 28' W. (Var. 31? 30' E.) 694.07
feet to Corner No. 1, the place of be
ginning. Containing an area of 1.614
acres.
The names of the adjoining claims
are Perseverance No. 3 lode (pat
ented), Perseverance Placer (patent
ed), Martin lode( unpatented>, all be
longing to the Alaska-Gastineau Min
ing Company, and the Solo lode claim
(unpatented) belonging to Jesse
Blakely, Esquire.
The location notice of the Gastineau
mill site is recorded in Book 11 of
Placers, at page 106 of the records of
the Recorder for the Juneau Record
ing Precinct, District of Alaska.
This notice was posted on the ground
the 15th day of May, 1913.
First publication. May 16, 1913.
Last publication, July 18, 1913.
C. B. WALKER,
Register. I
I
Professional Cards
J. B. MARSHALL
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
114 Decker Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY j
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Robertson
ATTORN EYSAT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau .... Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. 'Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - * Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
Dr. J. S. Harrison
DENTIST
Rooms 106-107 Decker Bldg.
'Phone 2-0-5 Juneau, Alaska
__________
W. H. Cleveland P. J. Cleveland
Contractors-Builders
Estimates'Furnished Free Upon
Request
Good Mechanics, Good Material,
Best Results
'PHONE 6-0-3 JUNEAU
H. W. AVERILL
DENTIST
Case Bldg. Front and Main Sts.
Office Hrs: 9 a. m. to 12 m.
I p.m. to 5 p.m.; 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
'PHONE?209
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mail Steamer
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Punter. Ex
cursion Inlet, Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tennkee, Killisnoo, Chatham and
Sitka 8:00 a. m. April 4, 10, 16,
22. 28; May 4. 10, 16. 22, 28;
June 3, 9, 15, 21, 27; July 3, 9,
15, 21. 27; August 2. 8, 14. 20,
26; September 1, 7, 13, 19,
and 25.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
LJaranoff Warm Springs 8:00 a.
m. April 28th, May 28th, June
27th, July 27th, August 26th,
and September 26th.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sta., Eldred Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 8
a. m. April 2, 8, 14, 20, 26; May
2, 8, 14, 20, 26; June 1, 7, 13, 19,
25; July 1. 7, 13. 19. 25. 31; Au
gust 6, 12, 18, 24, 30; September
5, 11, 17, 23, and 29.
Returning Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 8 a. m.
WILLIS E. N'OWKLL, MANAGER I
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoaslService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swanson, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria nnd Seattle
PRINCESS MAY P. C. DOCK JUNE 12
Front and Seward Stu. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT, Asrt. '
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Aliuika Flyer S. HUMBOLDT The A ln.sk a Flyer
NORTHBOUND JUNE 14
SOUTHBOUND JUNE 15
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
'I 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1 M 1 ! I ! I I 1 1 1 1 1 I -I I 1 U 11111111 H 1 1 I I 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1
jW\ ALASKA j
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Safety. Service. Spi-cd Ticket* to Seattle, Tncomn. Victoria and Vancouver. Throuich ..
., ticket* to San Fnmciitco
?? JEFFERSON Northbound ....MAY 31 Southbound... .JUNE 1 "
JEFFERSON Northbound ....JUNE 13 Southbound ..JUNE 14 ??
" MARIPOSA Northbound JUNE 9 Southbound ..JUNE 18
-? NORTHWESTERN Southbound JUNE 3 T
." NORTHWESTERN Northb'd...JUNE 15 Southbound . .JUNE 22 I
" Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt. WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. [j.
?H-fr1 '1 1 11|?I ,1,1 I ; .M I I I..H
? IIAnTUI A A I r\ Allen Shattuck, Agent, Office ?
! INOKI mLAINL) with T,.?rf.r C. j
ry. a ? ry John Hen6on, Douglas Agent ?
? Steamship Company ?
? REGULAR FAST SERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU ?
? Southbound Sailings S. S. ALKI, - June 14 X
! p i. C j.j.1 First ^,ass $19.00 I
? rare to oeattie second ciass $12.00 |
Ii11IIII11111111111111IIIII111111II11111111111
ALASKA COAST CO. j!
? ? For Yakutat, Katatla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, . .
;; Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
!! S. S .ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 18
i ! S. S. YUKON JUNE 29 ? ;
;; SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA ;;
;; S. S. ADMIRAL SAMPSON JUNE 6 "
; ? S. S. YUKON M* I !
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. , ,
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ? ?
n 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
??????????????????????????????????
? PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. X
I SKATTJ.K, TACOMA, ij
? Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, n
? South Belllngham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, <>
? Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego.
? C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. o
X 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James 8treet, Seattle o
} S. S. SPOKANE North June 5 South June 6 J
? CITY OF SEATTLE North June 11-24 South June 12-27 X
? o
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
SUMMER FERRY TIME SCHEDULE STARTING MAY 26, 1913.
Boat Leaves Juneau
For Douglas and
Tread well
6:30 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. in.
1:00 p. m.
2:00 p. m.
3:00 p. in.
K: 00 p. in.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:30 p. in.
11:00 p. m.
I.cavon Trcndwoll For
Douglas and
Juneau
7:10 a. m.
8:25 a. in.
9:40 a. m.
11:25 a. m.
1:25 p. in.
2:25 p. m.
3:25 p. in.
5:40 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. ill.
9:55 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
L<?ve?
Doutrlu* Fur
Junouu
7:15 a. in.
8:30 a. in.
9:45 a. in.
11:30 a. in.
1:30 p. in.
2:30 p. in.
3:30 p. in.
5:45 p. m.
7:00 p. m.
8:30 p. in.
10:00 p. in.
11:30 p. rn.
Leaves Sheep ( rw'k
For Treadwell Douglas
ami Junrau
7:00 a. in.
9:30 a. m.
5:30 p. in.
SHEEP CREEK TRIPS
Loaves Juneau for
Sheep Creek
6:30 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
5:00 p. m.
I.eaves Douglas for
Sheep Creek
6:45 a. m.
9:15 a. in.
5:15 p. in.
On Saturday and Wednesday nights 11 p. in. trip will go to Sheep creek.
Leaving Treadwell for Juneau at 11:40 p. m.; leaving Douglas for Juneau
at 11:45 p. in.
Leaves Treadwell
for Sheep Creek
6:50 a. m.
9:20 a. m.
5:20 p. m.
5We Are||Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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