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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 23, 1913, Image 1

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THK ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III.. XO. 341. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, DEC. 23, 1913. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Wilson Castigates
Military Officers
?o?
WASHINGTON. Dec. 23? President I
Wood row Wilson in a letter made pub
lie yesterday aft* n oon to Secretary j
of War Lindley M. Harrison and Sec
retary of the Navy Josephus Daniels \
requested that "a very serious repri
maud" he administered to those offi
cers of the army and navy responsible
for the Order of Carabao dinner pro
gram.
(.'out inuing the President said:
"1 cannot prevent myself from feel
ing great disappointment that a gener- 1
al body of the officers of the army and
navy assembled at dinner should have
greeted the carrying out of such a pro
gram with apparent indifference when
it is a fact that it violated some of
the most diguitied and sacred tradi
tions of the service. I am told that the
songs were intended to be regarded as
'fun.' What are we to think of offi
cers of the army and navy of the Unit
ed States who think it fun* to bring
official superiors into ridicule and pol
icies of the government they are
sworn to serve with unquestioning loy
alty into contempt? If this is their
idea of 'fun,' what is their idea of
duty? If they do not hold their loyalty
above all silly effervescence and child
ish wit. what about their profession?
Do they hold it sacred?"
o ? o ? o
SUNDAY SCHOOL CHRISTMAS
EXERCISES AT M. E. CHURCH
? o-o ?
'1 his evening the committee having
the matter in charge will present the
annual Christmas program to be given
by the Sunday School of the M. E.
church. A varied list of songs, reci
tations, dialogues, class exercises, and
tableaux has been prepared. A lot
of little tots will make their first ap- '
pea ranee in public, which will be one
of the most delightful features of the'
evening. Many of the old stand-bys, |
such as Lillian Larsen, Claire Krogh.
and Nadine Sauni, will take part.
Little Miss Lida Olds will sing a solo.
A number of attractive exercises,
"Christmas Holly," "Christmas Bells," j
"No Room in the Inn," will be put on
by different classes. Miss Amy and
Miss Kli/abeth Hopper will sing a du
et. Mrs. Boydon, assisted by the choir,
will render the old Christmas carol,
"The First Nowell." Two special mus
ical numbers will be given by the en
tire school.
The last number will be a very beau
tiful tableaux, "Nearer My Cod to
Thee,55 by Dorothy Haley. Florence
Larsen and Genevieve. Jonas, with mu
sical accompaniment by Mr. and Mrs.
James.
Christmas candy will be on tap.
The church has been beautifully dec
orated. warmed and lighted and will
he a most pleasant place to spend this
evening.
SHEEP CREEK TO SEE
SANTA CLAUS TOMORROW
The Presbyterian Sunday School at
Sheep creek will give a Christmas tree
and program at the mess house there
tomorrow evening. The program ar
ranged will be interesting, and San
ta Claus has promised to make a vis
it
0 ? o ? o
MARINE NOTES ! 1
I 1
? 4 !
According to present schedule, the
steamer Al-Ki is scheduled to leave Ju
neau for Seattle Wednesday afternoon.
The steamer Spokane is due to ar
rive in Juneau tomorrow and is ex
pected to sail for Seattle Thursday
evening or Friday morning.
Information has been received by
the local office that the steamer
Admiral Sampson will leave Seattle
Jan. 15th and arrive here Jan. 18th.
en route to Cordova, Valdez and Kod- 1
iak.
The freighter Bertha arrived at 1
o'clock this morning and left for Doug
las later to finish unloading.
The steamers Princess May and
Northwestern are due to arrive in Ju
neau some time tomorrow from the
South.
LADIES' COAT AND SUIT SALE
? o-o ?
Sale commences Wednesday, De
cember 17 and ends Saturday Decem
he- 20.
The stock consists of Wooltex and
Marshall Field makes, and are all 1913
models. During the sale these goods
will not be sent out on approval and
no allowance will be made for alter
ations. Regular credit cutsomers can
have goods charged. All goods marked
in plain figures about as follows:
$15 garments, now $ 8.60 to $ 9.90.
$25 garments, now $15.90 to $16.90.
$30 garments, now $16.85 to $18.60.
Come in and look them over. B. M.
BEHRENDS CO., Inc. 12-16-tf.
I
TREADWELL SMOKER
WAS GREAT SUCCESS
? o-o ?
DOUGLAS, Dec. 23? A packed house
greeted the smoker given at the Tread
v, ell Club by the Treadwell firemen
last night. A large number were pres
ent from Juneau.
l'he following is a list of the events
and their results:
Monte Snow sang and was enthus
iastically received. He had to respond
to an encore.
I assidy of Juneau, and Parker of
Douglas, went three lively rounds to
a draw. These men were in the feath
erweight class.
Kearney, of Treadwell, gave a clog
dance that was real good. He then
sang.
Opperman, of the survey gang, and
Olson, of the cyanide plant, boxed 3
rounds to a draw.
l'eters, of the machine shop, went [
up against Haton, of the 300 mill, and
some lively boxing was seen.
The only wrestling match of the eve- 1
ning was won by Schar, of Douglas,
over Fisher, of Juneau. The match
was scheduled to go seven mniutes.
and if one man got a fall, that settled j
it. There was some swift work for a
few minutes. Schar finally pinned his
opponent's shoulders to the mat.
Schar outweighed Fisher 40 pounds.
Jack Wilson made a little speech, in j
which he said thanks should be given
to the second team of football play
ers who stood the bumps of the first
Uam so well in practice. He also,
for the management, gave each mem
ber who played in the Thanksgiving
game a beautiful, dark red sweater
with the letter "T" on one side.
The following received sweaters,
and were cheered as they went up to
receive them: Messrs. Gross, Allen,
Schar, Beels, Sample, Mauseth, W.
Banjuist, Will Barquist, Swarva, Nel
son, Porter. Kertis, Theleike and Mc
Donald.
A speech was demanded by the
crowd from Sample, and he said that j
rht game was one of the hardest that
he had ever seen or had been in.
The next event was a boxing match
between Ktz, of the cyanide plant, and
Kt nnedy, of the survey force, in which
some classy boxing was witnessed.
Goeble, of the Treadwell mine, and
Gross, of the Mexican mine, went four
rounds to a draw. Some firce fighting
was presented.
Buns, weiners and coffee were
hoartily enjoyed in the fire hall im
mediately after the smoker.
Jack Wilson acted as announcer and
referee
The Treadwell orchestra rendered
late selections and deserves praise.
MINE BLOWED UP FOR
BENEFIT OF SCIENCE
An inspection of the experimental
station at Pittsburgh convinced Mining
Inspector William Maloney that the i
men there are doing a great work.
They have a fully equipped mine for
setting off explosions with a view of !
solving the question of making under- 1
ground mining safe. The management
thought it had partly succeded in find- i
ing a means for making coal dust ,
safe. Clay dust was sprinkled with
the coal dust and then two explosions
set off. Neither showed the usual de
structive effect. The expriment was
tried the third time and it worked fine; j
or rather it literaly blew the mine to
pieces. The reason assigned was that
the weather was much drier preced
ing the third explosion making the
coal dust more combustible. It has
been found that the most successful j
weapon against coal dust is to keep the \
mine damp so that the dust will not
fire. Mr. Maloney says the station is
making remarkable progress in get
ting out new safety devices and its
work already has greatly reduced the
death rate in the United States.
o ? o ? o
HOLLY AND MISTLETOE .
We have a large quantity of holly
and mistletoe? with plenty of berries
on the holly. CHAS. GOLDSTEIN.
o ? o ? o
ORPHEUM TONIGHT.
Tonight's program at the Orpheum
will present "the Fire Cop," a fine
Selig drama showing many thrilling
features of life-saving.
"N'atrosa," is a fine Indian drama,
by the Vitagraph Co.
"A Near-Sighted Cupid," is a clever
Selig comedy.
"Pulque Pete and the Opera Troupe"
is a dandy comedy by the Kalem com
pany. All good.
(Watch for the annual pictures.)
o ? o ? o
Miss Agnes Manning, who has been
visiting friends in Juneau, left for
Sitka yesterday on the steamer Al-Kl.
o ? o ? o
Eat at the Pioneer, and die happy.
DOUGLAS NEGRESS
SHOOTS JIM CARRUTH
? o-o ?
Jim Oarruth, while delivering beer
ia Douglas at an early hour this morn
ing to Cleo Wardell, a colored woman
of the underworld, was badly wounded
in the side with a bullet from a trity
two calibre revolver fired by the lat
ter, and is in a Douglas hospital. The
woman was arrested and arraigned be
j fore U. S. Commissioner J. B. Marshall
and her bail fixed at $1,000 cash. She
| is still in jail. Her hearing will be
held at 2 o'clock tomorrow. She
I claimed the man was the aggressor,
having hit her over the arm with a
beer bottle.
CAMP FIKE?GIRl!s?
SCORE A SUCCESS
The special sale held by the mem
bers of the Camp Fire Girls in the
basement of the Presbyterian church
yesterday afternoon and evening
proved a social and financial success
Enough money was raised to insure
an outing for the club next snummer.
More thau $60 was realized.
The young ladies dressed as Indian
maids added to the color of the decor
ations and added interest to the sale.
Miss Ethel Kempthorne was ably as
sisted by the following:
Senior circle ? Georgia Caro, Rose
McLaughlin, Gladys Swanson. of candy
booth; Hazel Myer and Ruth Ormsted.
of jumble booth; Alice Margrie, Gladys
Tripp and Helen Troy, of tea booth;
Lilly Karhanen and Margaret Dudley,
guardian assistants.
Junior circle ? Folrence Larson, Rose
McLaughlin and Dorothy Troy, candy;
Gertrude Nelson and Lillian Larson,
jumble booth; Margaret Delzelle, Hel
en Hendrickson, Madge Case and
Mary Kashaveroff, tea; Mable Bathe
and Myrtle Jorgenson, guardian as
sistants, and Emma Perelle, fireman, j
The order of Camp Fire Girls is na
tional in its scope, having branches
in nearly every city in the United
States, with headquarters in New York.
It is intended to be for girls what the
"boy scout" movement is for boys. It
is to furnish healthy and intellectual
food for the minds of girls. The lo
cal club members will interest them
selves in studying Indian legends and
they expect to dig up a lot of Indian
lore which otherwise would be lost
to civilization.
ALASKANS FARE BETTER
THAN PUGET SOUNDERS
Down on the Puget Sound country
the Christmas dinner tables will be
garnished with California grown cel
ery. Here in Juneau diners on the
great holiday will relish delicious, Alas
ka-grown celery. Juneau merchants
have been regular buyers of this
health giving and delectable vegetable
from H. D. Clark, of Skagway, whose
celery enjoys a well earned fame
among those who live in and who trav
el through the North country. The H.
J. Raymond company have handled
hundreds of dozen bunches of his cel
ery this fall, and receive shipments
from him via every boat that comes
from the North.
ALASKAN IN HOTEL
BUSINESS AT VICTORIA
o~~o ' ?
Jack Smith, formerly of Katalla, has
bought the Manitoba House in Vic
toria and is remodeling the same into
an up-to-date and modern hostelry. Mr.
Sftnith was proprietor of the Northern
hotel in Katalla in early days and has
a large acquaintance all over the
North from Ketchikan to Point Bar
row. Everywhere all over the North
he has friends who will be pleased to
learn of his new venture.
The Manitoba hotel is one of the
best known places in Victoria and is
beautifully located in the very heart
of the town at 610 Yates street. There
is not the slightest doubt but that Jack
Smith will prosper with his new estab
lishment.
PARCELS POST^M AIL
IS WELL CLEANED UP
The employees of the postoffice have j
cleaned up all of the parcels post and
letter mail from the last steamers.
There was an unusually large volume
and additional Christmas mail is ex
pected on the Spokane and North- 1
western.
o ? o ? o
MANY EXPRESS PACKAGES.
In order to clear away the Christmas
express packages which will arrive
on the Northwestern and Spokane, the
local office of the Wells Fargo express
will keep open until noon Christmas
Day. The office has received a large
number of packages of which only a
few are left for delivery.
o ? o ? o
GOV. STRONG APPOINTS NOTARIES]
? n-o ?
John Mezger of Fox, and E. C. Tag- 1
gart, of Deadwood, Alaska, have been
appointed notaries public by Gov. J.
F. A. Strong.
FORTY THOUSAND CASH
FOR CHISANA CLAIMS
According to J. J. Price, as quoted I
in a Seattle newspaper, he and Frank
Manley and E. J. Ives have purchased
from William James and associates the '
latter's holdings in the Chisana for j
something like 1600,000 down with an !
initial cash payment of $40,000. The
claims bought are Nos. 4 to 9 on Bo- 1
nan/a creek: 1 and 3 and the bench
on the left limit of No. 1, Little Eldo- j
rado; discovery on Coarse Money
Gulch, a fraction between 9 and 10 on
Bonanza; 21 Glacier creek, and dis
covery and discovery annex on Gold j
Hun. Fletcher T. flamshaw originally j
had an option on this property but ,
failed to make good. At the present i
time six suits have been filed against I
the James' interests, but Maurice D. !
Leehey. ?b< well known Alaska-Seattle
attorney, has undertaken to defend 1
for Manley and associates.
STEAMSHIPS' PASSENGER
ACCOMMODATIONS TO CROW
The passenger accommodations of j
the Alameda and Mariposa will be j
increased when those vessels are over
hauled this winter. Eight additional !
staterooms will be added to the Ala
meda and ten to the Mariposa. This
result will be reached by building a
pilot house, chart room and master's
accommodations above the deck on
which they are now located on each J
of the. steamships.
ROOT' BEER BABES DEFEAT
GAS BOAT TRIPLETS
The Root Beer Babes ? J. E. Barra- j
gar, Milt Winn and J. W. Bell, defeat
( d the Gas Boat Triplets ? Earle Hun
ter. William Dickinson and Dr. E. H.
Kaser, at bowling last night by 71
pins. The score was 4547 to 4476. !
Harragar made the high average, !
176%; and Dickinson the high score,!
237. The contest was for a beefsteak
dinner, which 'the triplets will furnish
to their vanquishers next Friday eve
ning.
-o ? o ? o
SANTA CLAUS, JR., TO
COUNT NICKLES TONIGHT
Santa Claus, Jr., to be impersonated
by a Negro boy, will count the nickels
in the window of the Alaskan cafe be
tween 5 and 10 o'clock today. At 10
o'clock, Manager A. T. Spatz will an
nounce the result of bis work and win- ;
ner of the six-plate dinner that goes
to the customer making the best guess
as to the number of nickels that have
bbeen on display for over a week.
o- -o ? o
SANTA CLAUS MAKES
FIRST VISIT TONIGHT
? o-o ?
Santa Claus will make his first ap
p arance in Juneau at the Presbyter
ian church tonight. The Christmas
paper yesterday in which it is said that
7:30 p; m. The following Is the pro
gram:
Organ Prelude.
Song ? "King Out, Ye Christmas Bells."
Prayer by pastor.
Responsive reading.
Song? "The Shepherds Lay Watch
ing."
Recitation ? "We're Very Little Tots."
Primary.
Recitation ? Albert Orson.
Song ? Primary Class.
Recitation ? James Miller.
Exercise ? "The Reason Why."
Recitation ? Ada Irish.
Song ? "O. Christmas Tree."
Recitation ? Jean Stevens.
Exercise ? "The Christmas Bells."
Primary classes.
Song ? Francis Nowell, Jean Faulkner.
Recitation ? Madge Case.
Solo ? Mrs. Stowell.
Exercise ? "Surprising Santa Claus."
Arriva' of Santa Claus.
The public is cordially invited
to share with the children in this
Christmas cheer.
o ? o ? o
MASONS ELECT OFFICERS
? o-o ?
The Mt. Junoau lodge, No. 147, F. &
A. M., last evening elected the fol
:owing officers for the ensuing year:
H. T. Tripp, Worthy Master.
Chas. Nagel, Senior Warden.
Isadore Goldstein, Junior Warden.
E. D. Beattie, Secretary.
W. W. Casey, Treasurer.
The newly elected officers will be
installed at the next meeting.
GRAND BALL AT
DOUGLAS RINK
? o-o ?
There will be a grand ball given in
the Douglas roller rink on Christmas
Eve, given by the management. A
-even-piece orchestra will furnish the
latest up-to-date music for the occas
ion. Late ferry for Juneau dancers.
? 12-23-2t.
CREAM FOR XMAS.
The Juneau Dairy has plenty of
cream for the Christmas rush. Get
your order in early. 12-22-2t.
o ? o ? o
The Empire $1.00 a month delivered
JUNEAU CHRISTMAS |
DECORATIONS GOOD
? o-o
Juneau and Douglas are dressed in |
Holiday colors. The variety of the de
signs, their artistic arrangements and
their admirable blend of coloring, all
suggestive of Christmas, show excel
lent skill and taste on the part of bus- 1
iness men and window dressers.
There is a striking individuality
about each store, making a strong ap
peal to Christmas shoppers, and yet,
taken as a whole, the decorations give
a general tone of holiday cheer and
good will, as though designed special
ly for the larger effect.
To go into detail and give credit to
all those deserving mention for attrac
tive displays was found to be a task
too difficult to attempt. An observing
business man from the outside stated
that Juneau for enterprise, well se
lected and large stocks, and the at
tractive display of the same, will com
pare favorably with any live, first-class
city in the States.
Christmas shopping has been steady
and an excellent satisfactory volume of
business is being registered. The toy
departments have been drawn upon
heavily for the homes and the home
Christmas trees. The meat dealers
and caterers are busy with special or
ders for Chritsmas dinners. The jew
elers declare that many presents are
being purchased which run into big
money. In fact, the dominent note of
Christmas shopping in all lines is
sounded in the better class of goods
demanded. Women are going in for
furs more extensively than usual.
Smokers' articles are having an ex
cellent run, and in the windows are
displayed an odd and startling variety
of ware from which to choose, so that
the taste of every one? the young man
or young lady sweetheart, the wife or
husband, the friend, or children ? finds
an answer.
The fraternal organizations, the
churches, the schools and various clubs
will observe the day in a fitting man
ner with exercises and programs. The
closing exercises of the schools be
gan this afternoon in the Orpheum
theatre, and school will enjoy a va
cation until after New Year. Services
with special music will be held in the
churches. The public offices will be
closed and all hands will join in carry
ing out the spirit of the day.
Fortunately in Juneau none is so
poor but will receive part of the gen
eral good will expressed in presents
and other forms. There is no need for
a general appeal for charity in this
respect, such as forms such a sad note
in the less fortunate cities outside.
The communities of Juneau and Doug
las have no poor in the sense implied.
Therefore, the note of cheer observable
on every hand is all the more joyous.
TO THE PUBLIC
An item appearing in a Juneau
paper yesterday in which it is asid that
we have expressed any opinion of the
people of this city that reflects upon
their taste or lack of knowledge of
the prevailing fashions is without any
foundation in fact, and places us in a
wrong light before the people of this
place. The facts are that we have
been delighted with the reception the
ladies of this city have given us, and
we have been pleased with the ap
preciation they have exhibited for a
really first-class stock of up-to-the-min
ute ready-to-wear garments.
The only reason behind the news
paper's attack on us that we can im
agine is that the paper has not been
receiving the advertising that its man
ager persistently sought? and for
which he quoted the going commercial
rates in Juneau.
If any visitor at our place of busi
ness has felt that he or she was in
sulted by anyone connected with our
firm or that anything has been said
that was derogatory to the people of
this city, we know nothing of it. We
have been in business a long time, and
have always aimed to treat customers
and prospective customers with the ut
most respect and deference.
We like Juneau and its treatment of
us. As proof of this statement, we
propose to come back again, and we
will be here with the opening of the
spring with best stock of women's
modish garments ever shown outside
of a large city.
GREENBAUM & EPSTEIN.
Juneau, Dec. 23. ? *?*
o ? o ? o
ORDER ICE BEFORE XMAS.
No ice will be delivered Christmas
Day. These desiring it should order
today or tomorrow.
JUNEAU COLD STORAGE CO.
RAYMOND BUYS INTEREST.
S. P. Raymond, a well known con
tractor and carpenter, has bought an
interest in the firm with L. Van Lehn,
on Second near Franklin. Several im
provements are to be added.
o ? o ? o
A box of nice stationery is appro
priate for a Xmas gift, at Nelson's. |
Senate and house Agree
On New Currency Bill
WILE CONFIRMED AS
IDITAROD POSTMASTER
Washington, Dec. 23. ? The
nomination of Albert Wile, of
Iditarod, as postmaster at that
place, was confirmed by the
United States Senate yesterday.
I ?
COL. JACKLING IS
HOPEFUL OF OUTLOOK
? o-o ?
SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 23. ? Col
D. C. .Tackling said in an interview
that the people of the East are more
pessimistic than the people of the
West, "Things will right themselves,"
he stated, "but it will take time. If
the money market were easy there
would be great development work go
ing on in the West and on the Pacific
Coast."
o ? o ? o
RAILROADS MUST
GATHER MORE FIGURES
? o? o
NEW YORK, Dec. 23. ? New York
American's financial page declares that
at a cost of more than $1,000,000 rail
roads have prepared statistics of every
conceivable kind covering ten years'
operation, in their application for 5';
increase in freight rates. This was
believed sufficient. Then the Inter
State Commerce Commission engaged
Louis D. Brandies as its attorney and
he made them compile similar statis
tics for five years further back.
o ? o ? o
Mexican Diplomat Visits Japan.
TOKYO, Dec. 23. ? Mexican Minister
to France Delabarra arrived here yes
terday and was accorded much honor
by the Japanese.
o ? o ? o
CHRISTMAS SERVICES
AT TRINITY CHURCH
There will be special services held
in Trinity Episcopal church on Christ
mas Day at 11 a. m. with choral com
munion service with sermon. Subject.
"The Christmas Message." Music by
the full vested choir, including anthem.
"Glory to God in the Highest," an of
fertory solo by Mrs. H. L. Faulkner.
Everyone is cordialy welcome.
O ? o ? o
NOTICE MUSICAL CLUB.
-"-o? ?
The Juneau Ladies' Musical Club
will not meet for two weeks. The
next meeting will be Tuesday, aJn. 6.
12-23-lt. MRS. KASER, Secy.
o ? o ? o
GRAND THEATRE.
The show last night was certainly
well enjoyed. "The Legend of Cug
iioBtri," a 2-reel Gaumont feature, cer
tainly made a hit; full of interst,
your last chance to see it tonight.
"Nursie and the Knight" ? most in
teresting boy actors ever shown.
"Mabel's Adventures," Keystone
comedy very laughable.
o ? o ? o
BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED
? o-o ?
At the City hall with the city en
gineer have been filed the following
building permits:
Occidental Hotel, for alterations, to
^ost $400; Henry M. Olson, for a beach
?ottage on Lot 2, Block B.
<1 ? o ? ?> ? ? -
POHLMANN GOES TO KATALLA
? o-o ?
Dr. Emil Pohlmann has closr ' his
office at Juneau and will leave on the
Northwestern for Katalla where he
will locate for the practice of medicine
L. E. Kennedy, superintendent of the
unlin mine, who has been registered
at the Occidental, having covered he
Territory for his firm to the West
ward. .
Mr. snd Mrs. S. Enochs have apart
ments at the Occidental Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Litino are guests at
the Occidental Hotel.
M. J. Woodbury, of Salem. Ore., is
a guest oat the Hotel Cain.
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Howard, of Chi
cago 111., have rooms at the Hotel
Cain. They are looking around with
the intention of locating.
T. Jones, of Sheep creek, is registered
at the Hotel Cain.
L. A. Hooper and Sherman Goodwin,
of Seattle, are at the Hotel Cain.
Hanner Huttula, of Astoria. Ore., is
at the Hotel Cain.
Joe Jackson is registered at the Oc
cidental Hotel from Douglas.
Chas. Wells, C. W. Speer, Jacob Nor
dahl and Peter Pavoloff have booked
passage for Seattle on the Al-Ki sched
uled to leave Juneau, Dec. 24th.
George Startup, former Mayor of
Ballard, Wash., and prominent lum
berman of Puget Sound, was a pas
senger north on the Al-Ki enroute to
Skagway.
WASHINGTON', Dec 23? The Na
tional lluuse of Representatives last
night passed the report of the confer
ence committer which accepted most
of the Senate amendments. The re
port received the solid Democratic
vote and th? support of 37 Republican
membciR of the House.
President Joins in Celebration.
President Woodrow Wilson was a
guest at a local theatre when the an
nouncement was made that the House
had agreed to the conference report on
the currency bill and he stood up in
bis box and joined in the celebration
that followed. The audience sang
"Old Nassau," the alma mater sons of
Princeton and the President joined in
the chorus.
Senate Ratifies Amendments.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 23.? The Unit
ed States Senate today agreed to the
conference committee report oi? the
currency bill by a vote of 43 to 35.
The measure now goes to the Pres
ident for his signature. It becom< - a
law as soon as signed by the President
but it will not become actually ef
fective until the system provided for
can be organized.
? o-o?
President To Sign Bill.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.3? President
Woodrow Wilson will sign the curren
cy bill at 6 o'clock and leave for I'as
christian. Miss., five hours later.
PHELPS ESTATE TO
HE CONCENTRATED
? o-o ?
NKW YORK. Dec. 23. ? Arrange
ments have been concluded for the
merging of all real estate in various
parts of New York City owned by
members of Stokes family into a new
corporation. to be know n as the Phelps
Stokes Estate. Inc. The holdinp- are
stiinated at J5.000.00ft.
SFTH LOW OPPOSES
GOVERNMENT RAILWAYS
NEW YORK, Dec. 23 ? A sharp warn
ing against federal control of rail
roads was pounded in an address be
fore the fourth-nth annual meeting of
the National Civic Federation by Pre
Setli Low of that organization. This
warning was directed to the govern
ment, to the employees of the railroads
to the national investors, and to the
great American traveling public. Mr.
Low says that investieation has shown
him that in Europe the earning of kh\ -
eminent-owned railroads barely equal
the amounts paid out by American rail
ways in taxes.
STEEL TRADE IS
LOOKING 1'PWARD
PITTSBURGH, . Dec. 23.? A change
for better in the steel trade has come,
according to leading steel men. It
is said that the volume of inquiries
received by the Carnegie Steel Co.
rluring the last 48 hours was equal to
those received during any two weeks'
period within the last two months.
Steel trade imprests in the Pittsburgh
district have assumed a decidedly op
timistic position in regard to the out
look, and expect that within 30 days
the upward movement will be under
way.
o ? o ? o ? ?
AMERICAN DUCHESSES TO
SPEND XM AS AT HOME
NEW YORK. Dec. 23.? The Duchess
es Desehaunes and Manchester arrived
here yesterday to spend Christmas in
the land of their nativity with rela
tives.
o ? o ? o
PROF. HENRY LANDES
PRESIDENT OF U. OF W.
SEATTLE, Dec. 23. ? Prof. Henry
Landes, dean of the school of scicr.c^,
has been elected temporary president
of the University of Washington to
succeed Dr. Thomas Franklin Kane.
O-rO O
BUFFALO MAY BO
THROUGH CANAL
WASHINGTON. Dec. 23? It is said
plans are being made to sgend the
Buffalo or some other war vessel
through the canal tomorrow as Goe
thal's Christmas present to the Ameri
can people.
HINTS TO THE WISE:? It is get
ting near to the day when you will fi
nally have to make up your mind just
what to buy for Christmas and New
Year's gifts. The popular fancy runs
this year to Parisian Ivory. A splen
did assortment of it may be seen at
Doran's Drug Store. 12-10-tf.
OYSTERS! OYSTERS! OYSTERS!
Place your orders early for oysters
at Goldstein's to insure having them
for your Christmas dinner. 12-20-3t

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