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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 29, 1913, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 345. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, DEC. 29, 1913. PRICE, TEN CENTS
HUERTA WILL RESIGN AND TAKE COMMAND OF ARMY
Gov. Lister Removes
Regents of University
OLYMPIA. Wash., Dec. 29. ? Gov.
Ernest Lister announced last night
that four members of the board of re
gents of the University of Washing
ton have been asked to resign on ac
count of the action of the board in re
moving President Thomas Franklin
Kane from office and that they would
be removed if their resignations were
not forthcoming.
? o? o ? ?
One Regent Resigns.
SEATTLE. Dec. 29.? A. L. Rogers, of j
Waterville, resigned this morning as
a member of the board of regents of
the University of Washington. The oth
ers whose resignations have been re
quested are President Al. McEwen, F. !
A. Hazeltine, of South Bend, and John
C. Higgins, of Seattle. Hazeltine is ed- j
itor of the South Bend Journal and
Higgins is a Seattle lawyer and grad- j
uate of the University. Both of them [
are leading Republican politicians.
LUCAS SEEKS TO
REGAIN CITY OEEICES
Suit was commenced in the Federal
court today by W. T. Lucas in which E.
\V. I'ettit is named as defendant to re
gain the city offices he formerly held.
The action grows out of the summary
discharge of Mr. Lucas by the mem
bers of the city council from his po
sition as magistrate, city clerk and tax
collector, and the appointment of Mr.
Pettit thereto.
As a matter of fact three separate
suits have been filed to fully cover the
separate offices performed by one
man. The complaint, however, in
each case, is practicaly the same.
The complaint states that April 4,
1913, plaintiff, in accordance with Sec.
627 of the compiled laws of the Terri
tory of Alaska, was duly appointed
clerk lor the term of one year, and he
qualified and entered upon his duties.
Further:
"That on the 20th day of Oecember
A. D. 1913, the defendant usurped the
said office and has ever since unlaw
fully withheld and does still unlawful
ly withhold the same from the said
relator, W. T. Lucas, and has ever
since assumed to exercise and does
still assume to exercise the functions
of said office.
"First, That the defendant is not en
titled to the said office and to be oust
ed therefrom.
"Second, That the said W. T. Lu
cas is entitled to said office and that
he be put in possession of the same
and of all the books, papers and prop
erty belonging thereto."
o ? o ? o
PIONEER ALASKA BREWER
DIES AT FAIRBANKS
? o-o ?
Herman Barthel, one. of Alaska's
pioneer brewers and the president and
manager of the leading brewery of
Fairbanks, died at the metropolis of
the Tanana valley, December 12th, the
result of apoplexy. He is survived by
a widow, two sons and a daughter.
Herman Barthel is an Alaska pio
neer. He located at Skagway in the
early days of that city's history, and
was manager of the old Skagway
Brewing and Malting company at that
place until he went to Fairbanks and
established a brewery there more than
10 years ago. He accummulated a
small fortune in the Fairbanks coun
try. His friends were numerous in all
sections of the North. He was about
60 years of age and a native of Ger
many.
n ? r> ? n
TRINITY CHRISTMAS TREE
TOMORPOW NIGHT AT CHURCH
The Christmas tree entertainment of
Trinity Episcopal church will take
place at that church tomorrow eve
ning. A special entertainment has
been arranged. It will be Santa Claus'
last appearance at Juneau for this
year.
o ? o ? o
MR. AND MRS. THANE
TO KEEP OPEN HOUSE
Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Thane will hold
open house on New Year's day from
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. for their friends and
the employees of all the companies
that come under Mr. Thane's manage
ment.
o ? 6 ? o
Nicely furnished room to < let, with
bath, two minutes from business dis
trict. 123 Gold st. 12-lS-tf.
o ? o ? o
Eat at the Pioneer, and die happy.
SITKA CHILDREN TO
APPEAL TO JENNINGS
H. L. Faulkner, the United States
marshal for this division today re
ceived the following telegram from C.
De Arnold, the United States commis
sioner at Sitka:
"Have three dependent children
who must be taken care of. Can
you recommend where they may
be sent?"
The marshal wired the following reply:
"Attorney-General has informed
Governor all laws passed by Leg
islature imposing duties federal of
ficials null and void. Holds com
missioners no jurisdiction act as
judges juvenile court or perform
other territorial duties. Gover
any other territorial duties. Gov
ernor suggests you wire Judge
Jennings at Arctic Club, Seattle,
requesting him make appropria
tion for dependent children from
Indigent Fund."
The federal officials find that the
decision of the Attorney-General is j
far-reaching and their hands are tied
in a hundred different ways. The
money at present in the Indigent Fund
will revert to the United States treas
ury unless used before the 31st day of
December, and that fund seems to pre- 1
"That on the 20th day of December !
ing after the cases in point.
WITNESS CHARGES SALOON
MAN HIRED "SLUGGER"'
That Al. Carlson, proprietor of the
Lonvre bar, promised money to "Red"
Frank Lewis if he would "slug" 1
George Kelso, was testified to by Fred
Kelso, brother of George, in the police
court before City Magistrate E. W.
Pettit this morning.
The details cropped out in the trial
of Lewis on a charge of assault and
battery, sworn to by Fred Kelso. Ac
cording to the latter "Red" made a
mistake and slugged Fred instead of i
George, while the other was at the bar
taking a drink. Fred testified that he j
had never seen his assailant before,
but when the latter landed on his jaw
he mixed things. After the first heat
ed round he proposed that they ad
journ to the sidewalk, so as not to
continue the row in a man's house.
There the argument was renewed in
a spirited manner. Fred claimed that
he slipped and that "Red" kicked him
in the neck.
A crowd quickly gathered, and Capt.
J. T. Martin, chief of police, appeared
promptly on the scene and took "Red"
to the local jail.
At the trial this morning the broth
ers corroborated each other's testi
mony as to the fight, and alleged that
Carlson had hired "Red" to do the
slugging, because of a fancied friev
ance against George. "Red" admitted
he had been promised the money, but
stated that no sum had been paid over
to him. He said he did not remember
much about the slugging match as he
was drunk at the time. Magistrate
Pettiit declared that it was an aggra
vated case; that the fact that a man
committed a crime while under the
influence of liquor "was no excuse, and
the further fact that the act in ques
tion was done under the promise of
pay made it still more serious, and he
would impose a jail sentence of 15
days and a fiine.
"Red" demurred to this and thought
that Fred Kelso also should be tried
for assault. The magistrate told him
that he could swear to a complaint
against the other man if he so desired
and he would then hear the eivdence.
"Red" also demanded to know if he
could have a jury trial, and was in
formed he could by putting up the jury
fees in advance. Finally, after recon
sidering the matter, and upon the ad
vice of Chief Martin and the plea of
the Kelso brothers, the magistrate
changed the sentence to $50 fine.
O O ? o
TO INVESTIGATE MEAT
PRODUCTION CONDITIONS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29? Secretary
of Agriculture D. F. Houston has ap
pointed a committee of experts with
Dr. R. T. Galloway, Assistant Secre
tary of Agriculture, as chairman to
conduct an inquiry into present unsat
isfactory meat production conditions
in the United States.
o 0 ? o
Samuel Hirsch will leave on the
Northwestern for a short business trip
1 to Seattle.
PERSERVERENCE PARTY
EVENT OE SEASON
Th entertainment afforded fully 300
people by the Silver Bow Ptarmigan
Club Saturday night at the Persever
ance mine, was the social event of the
season. It will be a topic of conversa
tion and the enjoyment will be "lived
over" for some time to come.
The exodus from town to the mine j
began early Saturday afternoon. Ed.
Hurlbutt, who handled the Juneau end
of the transportation of sleds, proved
himself well qualified for the respon
sibility. While many walked out to
the mine, the sleds made trips enough
to accommodate all hands.
The banquet defies description. H.
H. Morton, the steward, the general
who assembled all the good "eats," in
the opinion of the guests deserves a
special medal. It was no small under
taking to feed such a large crowd and
have everything pass off without a
hitch.
The members of the club acted as
hosts and made everyone feel at home.
The program of dancing and other
entertainments was varied enough to
give all alike a chance to enjoy them
selves.
Mrs. Paul Benson had charge of
the reception of the ladies at the mine,
and of the staff house, where they
were accommodated for the night.
Many of those who went to the
dance returned to Juneau before morn- j
ing, leaving Perseverance at about 2:30
o'clock, but the most of the guests of
the mining men remained at the mine
until yesterday morning where break
fast was served. They left on sleighs
for Juneau at 10 o'clock, and were in
the city in time to attend the morn
ing service in the various churches.
The music for the dance was one of
the features of the entertainment. The
dancing commenced at 9 o'clock and
continued until 1 when all hands as
sembled in the large dining room. Im
mediately after the supper dancing was
resumed until about 2:30. The Tread
well orchestra furnished the music.
The Silver Bow Ptarmigan Club is
an informal organization composed of;
employees at the Perseverance mine, j
the only executive officer being that of j
the president. Mr. G. T. Jackson, sup
erintendent of the Perseverance mine,
is at present occupying the office, hav
ing been unanimously elected.
The chairmen of the various com
mittees are as follows:
Program and Invitation. Harry Ben
son.
Music, Ralph Healy.
Refreshments, Ed. Dougherty.
Reception and Floor, G. T. Jackson.
Decorations, D. J. Argall.
Transportation, Lee Atkinson.
NEW DEPUTY MARSHAL
FOR PETERSBURG
H. L. Faulkner, the United States
marshal, has appointed John C. Allen
to succeed Thos. S. Elsmore at Peters
burg as deputy marshal.
Some time ago Mr. Elsmore re
signed, but Marshal Faulkner asked
him to remain until the end of the
quarter. Mr. Elsmore was elected city
clerk and magistrate and also the po
sition of cashier of the Petersburg
bank, which duties he will now active
ly assume.
Mr. Allen, the new appointee, is a
brother of James Allen, in the forest
service. He was formerly county as
sessor of Whatsom county; he has act
ed as a guard under Mr. Elsmore and
is familiar with the duties of the of
fice. He had the unanimous endorse
ment of the residents of ePtersburg.
NEW RATES IN EFFECT
AT THE CITY DOCK
Notices are being posted regarding
the new rates for freight at the city
dock passed by the council recently.
The rate on lumber has been raised
from 50 cents to $1 per thousand, and
the minimum on freight has been rais
ed from 10 to 25 cents.
The other rates are 50 cents per
head for horses and cattle; 50 cents
per ton for storage after the first three
days, not, however, to exceed $2 per
ton per month.
Perishable freight left on the dock,
Manager T. Banbury announces, will
be at the risk of the owner.
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS
ON STEAMER SPOKANE
The following named were the out
bound passengers on the Spokane
which sailed for the South Saturday
afternoon:
Mrs. E. Gordon, William Kneeborn,
Jas. S. Gerghegan, Edward W. Dix
on, Frank Adams, Jesse Fitzhugh, F.
J. Johnson, John Bennet, W. Baney, J.
Epstein.
CALUMET MINERS
BURY THEIR DEAD
CALUMET, Mich., Dec. 29. ? The
Western Federation of Miners buried
its dead yesterday. Fifty-nine bodies,
including those of 44 children, were
carried through the streets of the city
and down the winding country high
way and laid away in graves in the
snow-enshrouded cemetery within sight
of the shores of Lake Superior. Thous
ands of saddened miners formed the
funeral escourt. For hours the Sab
bath calm was broken by tolling bells
from all the city churches and by the
sound of voices lntbning the burial
chants.
The dead are the victims of the ca
tastrophe on Christmas Eve when a
false alarm of fire caused a stampede
from a building where the families of
striking miners were witnessing a
Christmas tree celebration.
o ? o ? o
MINERS IN COLORADO PAY
HEAVY TAX TO OPERATE
In his trip through- Colorado and be
fore the Mining Congress, Terirtorial
Mining Inspector William Maloney
found that there is a general complaint
among the mining men of Colorado ov
er what they consider an unjust tax.
They are taxed on their gross output
upon the value of assays at the mine,
upon the net from the smelter returns,
upon improvements and also upon in
dividual income besides. The mining
men claim that it seems to be the pol
icy of the farming element in control
of legislative affairs to tax the produc
ing mines out of buf>?ness, seeming to
overlook that fact that the mining in
dustry affords the best market for all
agricultural products.
u ? u ? u
LYNN CANAL BURIED
IN SNOW STORM
? o- o~?
Arrivals on the Spokane Saturday
say that the snow storm that prevailed
at Juneau Friday and Saturday ex
tended over Lynn canal points where
it was many times more severe than
at Juneau.
The Spokane which lay all day Fri
day at Hawk Inlet taking on 7000
cases of salmon was delayed at that
place from 7 o'clock Friday night until
9 o'clock Saturday morning on account
of the thickness of the storm.
There were 18 inches of snow in the
streets of Haines when the Spokane
left that place, and three feet in the
woods. So far this year more than
14 feet of snow has fallen at Haines.
IMPORTANT>~BUSINESS
FOR COMMERCIAL CLUB
Dicussion on a telegram from Seat
tle asking the support of the Juneau
Commercial Club for a government cen
tral bank of issue to be established at
Seattle for Alaskan business, will take
place at the next regular meeting of
that organization the second Tuesday
in January. The annual election of
officers will also be held.
The present officers are John Reck,
president; Harry Fisher, vice-presi
dent; Ike Sowerby, secretary; Emery
Valentine, treasurer.
It is desired to have as full a dis
cussion as possible on the proposal to
secure a government bank in Seattle.
It is realized that the subject is one of
vital interest to the people of Alaska
and more especially to the residents
of Southeastern Alaska.
It is certain that the subject will
bring out a great deal of interesting
discussion before any decision is
reached by the members of the com
mercial club.
o ? o ? o
SKAGWAY MAN WORKING
FOR REINDEER STATION
David N. Hukill, of Skagway, is
still busy with his scheme for a rein
deer station at White Pass City where
he has filed upon land for that pur
pose. In connection with it he wants
a school for Alaskan natives, to teach
them wood carving and the manufac
ture of toys and furniture. He claims
that the moss is the best in Alaska for
grazing reindeer, and that it is free
from the volcanic ash which ofttimes
covers the feeding grounds of the
reindeer to the Westward.
o ? o ? o
CHARLES BOYLE FUNERAL
IS LARGELY ATTENDED
The funeral of Charles Boyle, a pio
neer of Southeastern Alaska, held from
the Catholic church Saturday after
noon, was attended by a large crowd,
including many friends and pioneers.
The solemn requiem mass was sung
by the choir earlier in the day. The
Pioneers had gathered in a body at
Odd Fellows' hall and marched to the
church to attend the funeral. Floral
decorations covered the bier.
MOYER IS NOT ,
BADLY WOUNDED
CHICAGO, Dec. 29. ? The wound of j
President Moyer, of the Western Fed
eration of Miners, is not dangerous.
He is being treated for his injuries in
this city.
Demands Grand Jury Investigation.
The attorneys for the Western Fed
eration of Miners have announced that
a grand jury investigation to establish
the responsibility for the attack on
President Moyer will be demanded.
0 ? o ? o
GREAT FUN FOR "DE KIDS"
AT ELKS' HALL TONIGHT 1
The entertainment provided tonight s
for the children of Juneau and vicini
ty will prove a fitting climax to Christ- I
mas festivities. All children under
fourteen years are invited to attend.
There will be "Yellow Kid," "Bun- <
ny Frien' ", and lots of real people to t
childlind. besides a Christmas tree <
just groaning beneath presents ? pres- i
ents for everyone ? and a real live San- t
ta Claus. There also will be special
music along with the varied program. ]
The fun will begin at 7:30.
o ? o ? p
JUNEAU CHILDREN GUESTS
OF GOV. AND MRS. STRONG ?
The children of Juneau packed the ^
Orpheum theatre this afternoon at a .
matinee as the guests of Gov. and Mrs. ^
J. F. A. Strong. They enjoyed the {
entertainment hugely. A special pro- .
gram was put on.
o ? o ? o f
TAKEN UNDER ADVISEMENT.
(
The case of Ben Olson vs. C. F. f
Sheldon, assault, was taken under ad- 4
visement by United States Commis- f
sioner J. B. Marshal today, who will 1
give his decision in open court at 10
o'clock tomorrow. ;
o ? o ? o 1
SOCIALISTS SECURE LOT.
A warranty deed was filed with the j
United States commissioner today in '
which Hans J. Lorenzen and wife are
named as parties of the first part and 1
Grafton Coleman, George Hasrades ' c
and Chas. Helsin, as trustees of the t
Juneau Socialistic Educational Club, as t
parties of the second part. The deed i
is for title to Lot 3, Block 104, consid- i
eration, $350; upon which a temple
hall and reading room will be erected <
for the members of the association.
o ? o ? 0
ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD
RECORDER IN JUNEAU f
? o? o? - 1
Grant A. Baldwin, recorder of the ?
Arctic Brotherhood grand camp, ar- ,
rived from Haines on the Spokane Sat- f
urday. He will leave on the Georgia
for Tenakee where he will spend three ]
weeks at his pile camp. He is accom
panied by Mrs. Baldwin.
o ? o ? o
AT THE ORPHEUM. <
"The Receiving Teller," a first class ; i
Pathe drama with Crane Wilbur in 1
the leading role, and the comedy, "Sue ]
Simpkin's Ambition," featuring Leah !
Baird, were the leading attractions at 1
the Orpheum theatre last night. The 1
"Pathe Weekly" and a Biograph com- '
edy filled out a good bill which will 1
be repeated this evening.
On Tuesday and Wednesday nights <
the Orpheum will present as a special
feature "At Napoleon's Command," a
splendid 2-reel war drama reproduc
tion of the days of Waterloo. . 1
ARRIVALS ON GEORGIA.
Following is the list of passengers
on the steamer Georgia:
From Sitka? Harry Cornelius, Chas.
Huijghe, N. E. Bolshanen.
From Killisnoo ? Basket Bay Chief,
Mrs. B. B. Chief.
From Tenakee ? Mrs. Howard Pierce,
Toe Pariso, J. Froley, J. N. McKay, i
Native Joe, and Pat Brennan.
From Gypsum ? Gust Hanson, John i
Olson, T. H. George. i
From Hoonah ? Mr. and Mrs. How
ard Bailey.
o ? o ? o
EASTERN STAR MEETING.
There will be a meeting of Juneau
Chapter, No. 7, O. E. S., at Masonic
hall, Odd Fellows' building, Tuesday, ,
Dec. 30th, 8 p. m. All visiting Stars
cordialy invited. By order of W.M.
ORA MORGAN, Secy. 29-2t.
o ? o ? o
Herman Slyman and F. J. Oliver, of
Seattle, are registered at the Hotel
Cain.
Miss Eva Cole, who has been at
tending school in Southern Califor
nia, is expected home by her parents
tomorrow on the steamer Jefferson.
Fred Hildebrande, the well known
plumber, was taken suddenly sick
Saturday, and is confined to his
rooms.
o? o ? o
Even the cook eats at the Pioneer.
Opp. City Dock 12-20-tf.
Gen. Huerta to Retire
Prom Mexican Presidency
HIGH AEROPLANE
RECORD BROKEN
ST. RAPHAEL, France, Dec. 29. ?
rhe world's altitude record for aero
lanes was broken yesterday by George
Legag Neux, the French aviator, who
iscended to a heighth of 20,295 feet
ibove sea level.
Flying Man Scares Palestine Denizens.
JAFFA, Palestine, Dec. 29. ? Jules
V'edrines, the French aviator, passed
jver this place yesterday on his flight
:o Cairo. His appearance caused great
;onsternation among the inhabitants,
nost of whom were ignorant of the
existence of flying machines.
o ? o ? o
HAINES FOX FARM
IS PROSPEROUS
HAINES, Dec. 25? T. D. Lahey, man- 1
iger of the l^ihey and Handley fox
arm, is here spending the Christmas
loliday. He says the farm is getting
t large increase in the number of fur
jearing animals on hand. The trap
)ing season has been a fruitful one.
ind has resulted in adding some fine
jairs of mink as well as additional
oxes to the farm. They now have 32
;ross and silver gray and two black
oxes, and they expect to have 25 pairs
)f fine mink before the close of the
rapping season which they expect to
lse for all that it is worth.
The foxes are caged in wire pens
vith a pair in each pen. They will be
cept for breeding purposes.
o ? o ? o
tvEY'S GRAND-DAUGHTER
NEEDS ASSISTANCE
? oo
WASHINGTON, Dec. 27.? Mrs. A.
Montgomery Blair, the aged grand
laughter of Francis Scott Key, author
)f "Star Spangled Banner," is in des
itute circumstances in this city. A
novement to provide for her wants is
inder way.
o ? o ? o
>TATE TROOPS AFTER
KENTUCKY OUTLAWS
PINEVILLE, Ky., Dec. 29? A Nation- 1
il Guard company of picked rifle men
las been called dut to give battle to
20 of Hendrickson's mountaineer clans
lien who have taken refuge in a mine'
shaft near this place.
[NSANE MAN?KILLS
FAMILY AND SELF
NEW YORK, Dec. 29. ? Fearing that
leath might come to him at any mo- 1
aient on account of an affliction of the
leart of which he suffered, Henry
Knell, secretary of the Philadelphia
steel and Forge company, killed his
wife and two children Saturday night,
wrote a will leaving his property to his
wife's relatives and then took his own
life. Temporary insanity is alleged.
CONFESSED0 MURDERER
SENTENCED TO H ANG
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 27? Ralph Fer
ris, confessed slayer of Horace Mon
tague in the hold-up of the Southern
Pacific, was sentenced today to be
hanged.
MINERS WON'T TAKE
NON-UNION MONEY
CALUMET, Mich., Dec. 27? Twenty
five thousand dollars subscribed by
non-union sources for the stricken fam
ilies of the strikers at this place was
declined by the latter and the strik
ers.
SURGEON-GENERAL OF
ARMY PASSES AWAY
? O? o?
WASHINGTON, Dec. 29. ? Brlg.
Gen. George H. Torney, surgeon-gen
eral of the United States army, died
here yesterday of pneumonia.
o ? o ? o
HINTS TO THE WISE:? It is get
ting near to the day when you will fi
nally have to make up your mind just
what to buy for your New
Year's gifts. The popular fancy runs
this year to Parisian Ivory. A splen
did assortment of it may be seen at
Doran's Drug Store. 12-10-tf.
o ? o ? o
Good board and rooms by the day,
week or month. Rates reasonable. St.
George House, formerly the Simpson
hospital. 10-S-tf
o ? o ? o
KRIGBAUM DRAYING CO.? Hauls
anything. Coal delivered. Phone 79.
Barn 3906. 12-1-tf.
MEXICO CITY, Dec. 29. ? Gen. Hu
erta announced today that he will re
sign the Presidency of Mexico at the
end of the present year and take the
field in person at the head of the
army in a campaign against the Con
stitutionalists.
In making the announcement of his
In making the announcement to his
proposed retirement, Gen. Huerta de
clared that Enrico Gorostieta has been
decided upon for the Presidency. He
will take office with the title of Pro
visional President, the same as that
now held by Gen. Huerta.
Rebels Say Huerta Must Levae
Country.
CHIHUAHUA, Mex. Dec. 29.? "Noth
ing less than the fall of Gen. Huerta
and his banishment from the country
will ever be considered as preliminary
toward peace in Mexico," said Gen. Vil
la today when informed of the declara
tion that Gen. Huerta will retire from
the Presidency of the Mexican govern
ment.
Mexicans Awaiting Battle.
PRESIDIO, Tex., Dec. 29. ? Four
thousand Federal troops are at Ojin
aga under the command of nine gener
als awaiting an attack by 4,000 Con
stitutionalists under Gen Ortpa who is
now at La Mula pass IS n.iles away.
PETERSBURG FILIPINOS
DESTITUTE IN SEATTLE
? o-o
SEATTLE, Dec. 29.? Fourteen Fili
pino boys who worked for six months
at the Petersburg cannery are here
and in destitute circumstances. They
say that they received no wages for
their season at Petersburg owing to
the rascality of the Japanese foreman.
O ? 0 ? o
GUTHRIE M. SCOTT ("SCOTTY")
GETS MARRIED IN SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Dec. 29. ? Guthrie M.
Scott, of Juneau, and Miss Katherine
Faeth, of Seattle, were married in this
city Saturday.
Mr. Scott, best known along the
coast among his many friends as
"Scotty," is a wholesale broker's agent
with headquarters in Juneau, and has
an office in the Hyde block along with
his father. The bridegroom has been
traveling along the west coast of Alas
ka several years, representing various
lines. Broker friends in Juneau were
somewhat surprised to learn that he
has taken the final step in matrimony.
o ? o ? o
FOUR SPEECHMAKERS
SERVING SENTENCES
"?O-O ?
Saturday afternoon O. Ross and John
Fayne were fined $35 each by Police
Magistrate E. W. Pettit for speaking
on the streets in violation of a city or
dinance.
They were also instructed by the
magistrate when the sentence was im
posed that they should do whatever
work was imposed upon them by the
chief of police.
E. C. Briggs and John Kayser, ar
rested previously for the same offense,
are also serving their sentence.
There have been no arrest for street
speaking since Friday.
PRESIDENT WILSON
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY
PASSCHRISTIAN, Miss., Dec. 29 ?
President Wood row Wilson c ebrated
his 57th birthday anniversary yester
day. He was the recipient of many tel
egrams from all sections of the United
States and many foreign countries
congratulating him upon the occasion.
President Wilson was born at Staun
ton, Va., Dec. 28, 1856.
? o-o ?
President Hears Country Preacher.
GULFPORT, Miss., Dec. 29 ? Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson sat in a quaint
little Presbyterian church here yester
day among a congregation numbering
less than 100 and listened to a ser
mon on "personal accountability of the
individual to his Maker," by Rev. Her
bert Albert Jones. He caine here
that he might dodge the crowd that he
suspected would be at the Passchris
tian Presbyterian church.
0 ? o ? o
Thomas George, superintendent* of
the Gypsum mine, arrived on the
steamer Georgia.
o ? o ? o
William Critchley was operated up
on today at the San Ann's hospital for
appendicitis, and is doing nicely.

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