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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 03, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III.. NO. 349. JUNEAU, ALASKA. SATURDAY, JAN. 3, 1914. V- PRICE, TEN CENTS
BAKER FOLLOWS MORGAN AND WALL STREET IS DAZED
. ???'? : ?
Battle of Ojinaga
Still Furiously Raging
PRESIDIO. Calif., Jan. 3.?Savage
fighting between the Constitutionalists
and the Federate at Ojinaga continued
all day yesterday and throughout the
uipht last night. It is continuing to
day with renewed ferocity. The be
seiged Federate who were thrown into
a panic at the beginning of the bat
tle. and who yesterday gave signs of
yielding, have returned to the attack
and they are resisting stubbornly all
the attempts of the attacking army for
force a capitulation.
President and Lind Confer.
PASSCHR1STIAN, Miss.. Jan. 3. ?
President Woodrow Wilson and form
er Gov. John Lind met in the cabin of
the Chester late yesterday afternoon,
and they spent several hours in con
ference over the Mexican situation.
This morning the President announced
that there will be no change in the ad
ministration's Mexican policy.
o
Refugees Cross Into Texas.
PRESIDIO. Tex.. Jan. 3. ? Two
thousand refugees crossed the river
from Ojinaga today into Texas.
The battle on the Mexican side is
still raging.
Constitutionalists Have Bank.
JUAREZ. Mex.. Jan. 3.?Gen. Villa
arrived here today and is establishing
a State bank to handle the Constitu
tionalists money.
o ?o?o
ROUTINE BUSINESS BEFORE
JUNEAU CITY COUNCIL
-?o?o- ^
At the regular meeting last evening
the city councilmen transacted the
following routine business:
The ordinance regulating the para-,
sitic population who live off the earn-1
ings of the women of the underworld
passed Its final reading last night and
was signed by the mayor today. It
carries with it a penalty of conviction "
of SO days in jail and a fine of $100.
or both.
The city attorney was instructed to
prepare an ordinance making it a mis
demeanor to expectorate on the {
streets or in public places.
The petition of the Royal Fruit com
pany was granted giving the firm the
right to use gasoline for its popcorn
machine, subject to the ordinance ;
regulating gasoline.
Monthly and contract labor claims
were allowed and the salaries of offi- ,
cers. including $250 to R. McDonald .
for painting on the City Hall. ,
The city clerk was ordered to draw
a warrant in favor of the school fund
on B. M. Behrends for $67.50.
The city marshal was instructed to
round up the business firms and find
out which ones were delinquent for
federal licenses. <
W. H. Case, of the police commit- <'
tee. reported that the premises of X.
Basin were unsanitary. City Marshal 1
P. L. Martin reported that he had in- 1
vestigated the premises and that they I
were all right. i
H. J. Raymond reported that the 1
court house sewer was broken, and
Mayor Chas. Carter reported a broken I
sewer on the premises of the Hooker 1
residence near Indian Town, which '
was referred to the city marshal to !
investigate and have fixed. 1
A government check for $(5.06 in
favor of Emery Valentine, represent
ing a refund on duty for coal, was
handed in without endorsement, and
a committee consisting of W. H. Case.
J. B. Marshall and H. J. Raymond was :
appointed by the mayor to see 5fr.
Valentine and get his endorsement.
Richard Dorwald appeared before
the council and asked that a public
forum be provided for public speak
ing in the city of Juneau. The mat
ter was referred to the street com
mittee to confer with Mr. Dorwald and j
see what could be done.
MISS E. KEMPTHORNE
TO RESUME TEACHING
Miss Edith Kempthorne will re
sume teaching Jan. 5. Time schedule
aa before unles by special arrange- j
ment
Vacancies for a very limited num-i
ber only. Applications may be made
from 9 to 11 on Monday morning.
PASSENGERS TO WESTWARD.
Passengers leaving Juneau on the
Alameda for points to the Westward
wefe J. H. Flonar. William Huddle, '
J. F. Baxter, and William Kayle.
o?o?o )
Eat at the Pioneer, and die happy.
WELL KNOWN MEN
GOING TO CHISANA
Henry Brntnober, Maj. S. A. Hunt
ington. George C. Wilson and D. C.
Sargent, form & very interesting party
aboard the Alameda enroute to the
Chisaua gold diggings. They have
horses at McCarthy and lots of pro
visions. including boilers and machin
ery aboard the Alameda which are to
be taken in over the McCarthy trail.
Sargent and Wilson are two of the
first to reach the Chisana diggings.
Maj. Huntington, was in 1898 cm
ployed by the Canadian government
and attempted to blaze the trail to
the Yukon metropolis via the Stlklne
river but the expedition was given up
although he passed through to Lake
Teslln and down to Dawson. Henry
Bratnober and D. C. Sargent have been
interested in Copper properties on the
Nebesna for many years and when the
strike was made in the Chisana the lat
ter immediately went into the country
and secured many claims in the choic
est section of the country. George C.
Wilson went into the Chisana coun
try in 1906 and sank the first hole on
Wilson creek. He was unable to get
to bedrock on account of water. At
that time Aaron Johnson was sluicing
on Johnson creek but the pay was not
good enuogh and ho gave it up. Later
the pay was located on Eldorado and
Bonanza.
Sargent left the diggings last Oc
tober and is very familiar with all
that has been done since the strike
as well as the general prospects of
the country. Both he and Wilson as
^11 as Mr. Bratnober believe that the
Chisana will make a good camp and
that it will be a great producer. They
are all hoping that the government will
build a railroad into the country.
ALASKA COAST CO.
PLANS FOR FUTURE
The services of the Alaska Coast
company will be resumed on the Alas
ka run with the sailing of the Admiral
Sampson from Seattle January 15 un-;
der command of the ever popular Capt.
M. M. Jensen. The Admiral Sampson)
has been thoroughly overhauled and I
will alternate with the Admiral Evans 1
which sails on February 5. On Febru
ary 15 Capt. Jensen will be transferred
to the Admiral Evans and continue on )
the run with that vessel. The Admir-!
al Watson will go on the Northern run
some time in May and the Admiral I
Sampson will be continued on the run
also if business warrants it.
o n 0
NEW BUSINESS FIRM
FOR CAPITAL CITY
L. E. Van Winkle formerly with the
office of the surveyor general for Al
aska who retired with W. L. Distin,
and L. U. Gordon, formerly of Chi
cago and recently in the auditing de
partment of the Alaska-Gastineau Min
ing company, have associated them
selves together under the name of
the Juneau Investment company.
They propose to buy and sell mort
gages, bonds and securities and to con
duct a general fiscal agency. They
tiave substantial connections in the
States and it is their Intention to open
offices in the Seward building, Juneau.
?o?o?o
EXTRA GOOD SHOW AT GRAND
TONIGHT AND TOMORROW
Special selected reels for tonight and
Sunday's show; all are first class.
"The Birthday Cake"?a very strong
Reliance drama; touching photo play.
"Gaumont Weekly"?latest events of
all the world; always good.
"The Tryant's Doom"?A very good
Thanhousor play: "Give me some hard
lessons teacher."
"Four Hearts Beat as Two"?very
laughable Gaumont comedy. You will
like it.
o?0?o
DR. I. H. MOORE IS SUCCEEDED
BY FAIRBANKS WCMAN
?o?o?
Dr. Aline B. Bradley, city physician
for Fairbanks, has been appointed a
member of the Alaska Board of Medi
cal Examiners for the Fourth division
to succeed Dr. I. H. Moore, who has
removed from the Territory.
o?o?o
HINTS TO THE WISE:?It Is get
ting near to the day when you will fi
nally have to make up your mind just
what to buy for your New
Year's gifts. The popular fancy runs
this year to Parisian Ivory. A splen
did assortment of it may be seen at
Doran's Drug Store. 12-10-tf.
TREADWELL PAYS
INCORPORATION TAX
The Alaska-Treadwell and the Alas
ka-Juneau Mining companies yes
terday, the first business day of the :
new year, paid their incorporation
taxes for the year 1914. They paid i
their taxes for the year 1913 almost !
immediately after the Territorial rev- i
euue law went into effect. The pay- i
ment yesterday was made to Terrltor- i
ial Secretary Charles E. Davidson.
Last summer, soon after the new
revenue law went Into effect, Super
intendent R. A. McKinzle, of the Al- <
aska-Treadwell company, filed appli
cation for a license to do business un- .
der the terms of the Territorial reven
ue law which imposes a tax on in
comes. The application was accom
panied with a statement of the incoino (
of the company for the previous year (
and the assurance that it would pay ,
its income tax when the amount due {
under the law could be ascertained. j
When the opinion of the Attornoy- (
General was first made public Mr.
Kinzle said that he believed that ausi- ,
ness men generally should pay their,,
Territorial taxes in accordance with ^
the intent of the Legislature irrespect- (
ive of any technical questions thut ,
might be involved.
HEAD-HUNTERS TO BLAME \
FOR SLAUGHTER OF GAME (
" " j I
In writing of the conditions in the , ^
Chisana and answering complaints; (
that prospectors were slaughtering
game in that district. Toney Diamond, (
the United States commissioner, in a (
letter says:
"As the result of the complaints I
have investigated and I am convinced
there is little, if any, illegal killing
and sale of game at present. I am
Informed that the illegal slaughter
was done by some tourists head-hunt- t
crs who neither know nor care about
the law. There are many people here <1
who are broke and were it not for the
game they would either have to lea', *e. ?
camp or starve. These men are t
prospectors and good citizens. I can 11
conceive of no better use to which j t
the game of the country could be put 11
than to feed them while they are de- j s
veloping its resources." I f
o?o?o
WOLVES MORE DESTRUCTIVE r
THAN ARE HEAD-HUNTERS ,
C. B. McDowell, of Chicken creek,!
who has made a study of the habits j t
of caribou, has written an interesting f
letter to the Governor about the same.
He says the main caribou range in ] f
Alaska is bounded on the northeast by i f
the Yukon river, the southwest by the j j
Tanana river and the southeast by the ^
White river. In this district the snow
fall is lighter than in any part of Alas
ka, the climatic conditions are the
most favorable and the feed the most
plentiful, so claims the writer. '
The calving season is during early
May and the letter says one may trav
el for days over the rolling hills near
the headwaters of Seventy-mile river 8
and the hills appear to be in motion 1
owing to the thousands and thousands 8
of herds of caribou and their young. (!
The calves readily become domestlcat- c
ed and will follow man. During the 1
calving season no males are seen c
among the herd. They Join the "cows" 1
in June or July.
The letter states that 25 wolves will
destroy more caribou than all the min- 1
era and residents In the territory. Even
the tourist head-hunters are not near
ly so destructive. The wolves camp
upon the flank of the herd, cutting out
their prey and feasting upon them con
tinually. The writer believeB a bounty
of $10 a head on wolves should be of
fered. This has been recommended
already by the governor in his report.
Mr. McDowell thinks that the caribou.
If properly conserved, will become a
valuable Alaskan Industry, supplying .
the markets of the world.
NEW STRIKE REPORTED
ON THE YUKON RIVER t
Fred G. Mulligan writing from Nula- ,
to to a friend in Juneau states that a ,
new strike has been made 400 miles
down the Yukon river from that point,
about 50 miles from Andreaofsky, at
a place called Marshall City, on Wil- .
son creek. Full details had not been
received at the time the letter was
posted. .
O?3?O
Even the cook eats at the Pioneer. '
Opp. City Dock 12-20-tf. r
o?O?O
Nicely furnished room to let. with
bath, two minutes from business dis
trict. 123 Gold st 12-18-tf.
O?0?0
Good board and rooms by the day. 1
week or month. Rates reasonable. St ^
George House, formerly the Simpson 4
hospital. 10-3-tX 1
DALTON-SWIfT ROW
NOTRECOGNIZED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.?The Inter
ior Department has declined to take
notice of the roported difference be- j
twoen Jack Dalton, superintendent of
transportation, and Disbursing Agent
Swift over the transportation of tho1
government coal from Matanuska to
the coast. The Department has In-1
structed both of them to expcdlto the j
work.
Jack Dalton replied to his instruc-j
lions saying that the trail is now
open and the coal moving. ''
JUNEAU ATHLETIC CLUB
HAS BEEN ORGANIZED
Tho Juneau Athletic Club has been j
organized with Leonard Hurlbutt pres-j
dent and H. F. Cain secretary, in an-'
iwer to an insistent demand on the
l>art of many Junpau residents who
iave been actively discussing the need
'or sime time.
The club, with a view of getting
lecessary support, will give Its Ini
tial dance Thursday evening, Jan. 8,
1914. in Elks' hall. The music will be
wceptlonnlly good and will be furnlsh
>d by its own orchestra.
It Is the intention of the club to give
i series of Thursday night dances,
he proceeds to be used for buying
?quipment with which to furnish a
Irst class gymnasium. Later, also, I
when a larger membership is secured,:
jy-laws and a constitution will be J
tdopted for governing the organiza
tion. Judging from tho Interest ex
>ressed, the membership; will Increase
apidly.
o?o?o??
TONIGHT AT ORPHEUM.
"The Dance nt Silver Gulch," a first
:lass Essany Western drama.
"Chief Whito Eaglo," a flno Lubln
Irama.
"The Borrowed Umbrella," a unique
lelig comedy.
"Max Gets the Reward," one. of
hose CInes-Pathe comedies, featuring
hat funny Max Under, will be to- j
light's bill at the Orpheum and
ihould furnish a fine entertainment to
inish out holiday week.
Sunday night's bill will present the
egular Pathe Weekly of world's
ivents and Mutt and Jeff in a now
ole.
"The End of the Foud," is a flno,
jUbin dramn of deep ipterest based '
in those family affrays of the South. |
"The Two Boys," is one of the'
ileanest and classiest of Lubin dramas, j
eaturing the stars Arthur Johnson, |
-ottie Briscoe and Johnson's two ?
ioys.
"Their Idols," a good Biograph come
ly will end a first class bill.
o?o?o
JORN IN MINNESOTA;
. DESIRED BE CITIZEN
John Olson applied to J. B. Mar
ihall, United States commissioner
his week to help him secure citizen
hip papers. He said he had never {
leclared his intentions before. The
lommissioner was well along in the
irocedure and everything was appar- (
intly progressing when he came to
he part where it was necessary to (
isk Olson where he was born.
He replied that Minnesota was his
latlve State.
The commissioner gazed at him a!
ull moment, to determine whether a
iractical Joke was intended, and then ,
emarked dryly:
"From last reports Minnesota still
lelongs to the United States and has
lot yet been taken over by Sweden.
Jerhaps though-T-perhaps?we shall
lave to cede it along with Senator
delson."
IUNEAU CONSTRUCTION CO.
SUED IN FEDERAL COURT
Cyrus F. Sheldon, through his at
.orncy, John G. Held, yesterday filed
luit against Gus Messerschmidt and
Charles Quackenbush and the Juneau
Construction company, to have them
?njoincd from putting up piling and oc
cupying a strip of ground 106 feet
vide, and another strip 70 feet wide
cetween his homestead and deep wa
er in Gastineau channel.
Sheldon alleges in his complaint
hat he has been in possession of 34
icres of land a mile northwest of Ju- ?
leau for the past 17 years; that he
ias built improvements thereon; that
le holds final certificate under the
lomestead act of March 3, 1903, is- <
tued by C. B. Walker, register of the !
Jnited States Juneau Land Office, and
hat the ground being occupied by the
lefendant company shuts him off from
ide water and it without worrant of i
aw. 1
?V.
ESQUIMAU GETS
CANADIAN DOCK
VANCOUVER, B. C., Jan. 3.?Offlclul
announcement has boon received hore
tliat the Dominion government has de
cided to purchase a site at Lang's
cove, Esquimau, Vancouver Island, for
a new government drydock large
enough to accommodate the largest
ocean liners In the world as well as
the biggest dreadnaughts of the navy.
The plans are already in course of
preparation for the work which will
cost $4,000,000.
o?o?o
NEW MAN FOR THE
WHITEHORSE MINES
J. D. Bowen, recently from Fresnil
lo, Zacatachas, Mexico, where he has
been engaged in the mining business, J
passed through Juneau on the Alameda
yesterday enroute to Whltehorse |
where he will take charge of the me
chanical department of the Atlas mine. J
Mr. Bowen says that Mexico is a j
good country in a very bad condition
at present and that this unsettled
state promises to remain for some |
time. The Huerta regime, he says, is!
supported by French and English cap
ital and that he is plentifully sppliefl
with funds. Standard Oil interests ho
states are furnishing the sinews of!
war for the revolutionists and that
they are not wanting for money. Un
der the circumstances he says it Is
not a good place to be engaged in any
sort of business, and that mining is
therefore not prosperous Just now.
GOVERNMENT TO INVESTIGATE
DEPORTATION OF MOYER
?o-o?
WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.-tThe De
partment of Justice today ordered an i
investigation of the deportation of
President Charles F. Moyer of the
Western Federation of Minors from
Michigan.
Moycr Will Go Back.
CHICAC Dr-Jan. 3.?Charles F. Moy-1
er announced today that he will re-!
turn to Michigan and continue his In-,
vestigations.
o?o?o
SPOKANE AND AL-KI
SAIL FOR THE NORTH
Seattle, Jan. 3.?The Spokane and
Al-Ki sailed last night for Alaska.1
They have passengers as follows:
Spokane?For Juneau: John A. Hen-!
ry, John Welner, George C. Teal and
wife, Gen. M. Salbott, W. H. Wenzel,
J. F. Gilmore, Miss Anna Gibralter,
and eleven steerage. For Treadwell:
Elizabeth Dowdncy.
Al-Ki?For Juneau: J. D. Goodrich,.
Mrs. Beggs, Capt. Chas. Davis, Joseph |
I.ossman, T. Mure, Gus F. Green, Miss |
Alma Cron, Mrs. Chas. Wolf, J. B.
Morris, A. B. Callaham, and William
Condon.
n00
COURT WILL CONVENE
MONDAY MORNING
The district court will convene Mon
day morning at 10 o'clock despite the
fact that Judge R. W. Jennings will
not be here to preside. J. W. Bell j
clerk of the district court acting under;
Instructions from Judge Jennings will
open court and adjourn to such time!
as Judge Jennings will arrive which i
will probnbly be Wednesday morning, j
January 7.
The civil calendar was completed J
today. The first case is entitled Willis
Thorpe and John Johnston vs. Henry
Shattuck, John Reck, Ed. Webster,
Fred Brotland, and the First National
Bank of Juneau and involves title to j
lands along lower Front street.
BUYS PARTNER'S INTEREST.
W. P. Jackson, of Jaxon's rink, has j
purchased the Interest of his partner,1
Mr. Smith, who leaves for the States,
shortly. Mr. Jackson will conduct j
the business until spring and then J
put it up for sale to some first class j
man.
O-?O?o
ENTERTAIN CORDOVA WOMAN
Mr .and Mrs. W. E. Kendrlck yes
terday entertained Mrs. William Mc
Donuld, of Cordova, formerly a well
known school teacher of that place.
Mrs. McDonald was returning home on
the Northwestern.
o?o?o
TERRITORIAL BOARD OF
DOCTORS MEET TUESDAY
??o?O?~
The Territorial Medical Board 'will
convene Tuesday in the Malony build
ing to examine applicants for license
In Alaska. Dr. John L. Meyers, of
Ketchikan, president of the board, and
Dr. H. C. DeVighne, of Juneau, secre
tary, will be present and will consti
tute a quorum.
SEATTLE WOMAN KILLS
HUSBAND AND SELF
SEATTLE, Jan. 3.?The police say
that Mrs. Henry V. Longtin, who was
asphlxiated with her husband Thurs
day night, turned on the gas that re
sulted In their deaths. She had told |
her husband that If he ever came j
home drunk again that It would be
j the last opportunity to do it. He was
Intoxicated Thursday night when he
came home, and the police believe that
she killed him and committed suicide.
NAVAL EMPLOYEES
GET MORE PAY
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3?Secretary
of the Navy Josephus Daniels an
nounced today that the wages of 1400 j
employees In the navy yards of the
United States have been raised.
Secretary Urges Higher Naval Rank.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels has
also recommended to Congress that
four vice-admirals should be created
to avoid embarrassment to American!
naval officers when their ships are in
foreign waters. All the other coun
tries have naval officers of higher rank
than that of rear-admiral, therefore, i
the American naval officers are Bub-1
ordlnante to those of other countries |
having much smaller navies than thej
United States at all official, social and
other functions.
o?n -n ?
GOVERNOR CLOSES
OREGON SALOONS
COPPERFIELD, Ore., Jan. 3.?The
Orepon National Guard closed the sa
loons at this place today pursuant to
dMers from Gov. Orville West. This
action followed the refusal of the sa
loons to close after the orders of the
Governor had been read to them by
Miss Fern Hobbs, the Governor's pri
vate secretary.
LONDON TAPER^ FOR
'FRISCO FAIR EXHIBIT |
LONDON, Jan. 3. ? The Times re
peats it demand that the national do-1
sire both of Germany and England!
for participation in the 'Frisco fair,
should not be thwarted by a question
of diplomatic puctillo, and requests'
that the truth be made known regard
ing the alleged understanding between
the two countries. It also says It Is<
erronetous to suppose that Emperor j
William did not favor German rcpre-;
sentation. * .
o?o?o
GERMAN GOVERNMENT
NEEDS MORE MONEY
BERLIN, Jan. 3.?The German and
Prussian governments are preparing j
to borrow another $187,500,000 on ac- j
count of Prussia and $37,500,000 on j
account of the Empire.
ECONOMIST PRAISES
NEW CURRENCY BILLj
?o-o?
NEW HAVEN, Jan. 3?Professor of!
Economics Irving Fisher of Yale,
speaking of the currency bill, says:
"On the whole I think the bill is a
good one, atjd it will tend to greater
stability and elasticity of the monetary
system and provide elasticity for our
credit currency, which is of chief Im
portance."
ALASKANS WANT TO BE
REPRESENTED AT FAIR
SEATTLE, Doc. 26.?Eight pioneer
associations of Alaska have joined In
an appeal to Congress to appropriate
$250,000 for an Alaska exhibit at the
Panama-Pacific International Exposi
tion at San Francisco in 1915. Asked
for Its co-operation, the Seattle Cham
ber of Commerce has endorsed the ter
ritory's request and offered the organ
isation's help in such manner as the
commercial bodies of the North may
suggest.
The cities represented in the move
ment are Nome, St. Michael, Ruby,
Fairbanks, Seward. Cordova, Peters
burg and Juneau. The fact that the
fair is to be held on a larger scale than
ever attempted before and is to take
place on the Pacific Coast, and that
the resources of the territory should
bo advantageously displayed on sucfi
nn occasion, is urged as rcnson for the
appropriation.?Seattle Times.
REV. JONES IS ?HONORED.
The local order of Moose presented
Rev. Livingston F. Jones with a gold
mounted badge last evening. He will
leave for California next week.
Stock Trading Comes
to Absolute Standstill
NEW YORK, Jan. 3.?Stock trading
was brought to absolute standstill in
the New York stock exchange by the
announcement of the withdrawal of J.
P. Morgan and Company from many
big corporations. The shock of the
Morgan announcement was Increased
by a statement from George F. Baker
that ho \vould follow the example of
the Morgan banking concerns, and that
he would withdraw from many of the
corporations with which he has been
identified in the past.
There were practically no sales of
railroad, industrial and other stocks
after the Morgan announcement yes
terday or todoy. However, there was
an absence of anything like a panic,
as those offering stock for sale were
as scarce as those desiring to make
purchases. Exchange members were
dazed by the changed condition of af
fairs, and simply are awaiting further
developments.
There Is a feeling of apprehension
among the brokers that the public
may become afraid and attempt to un
load securities in such a manner as
would force prices down, though it is
admitted that nothing approaching a
panic is in evidence thus far.
NO TRACE OE
LOPEZ IN MINE
BINGHAM, Jan. 3. ? Sheriff Smith
and posse entered the Apex mine
works after Rafael I^opez, the Mexican
bandit, yesterday. Upon tearing down
the bulkheads they found lunch buck
ets containing poisoned food un
touched. No trace of Lopez has been
discovered. The Investigation is still
proceeding cautiously.
REDFIELD FAVORS
EIGHT-HOUR DAY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.? Secretary
of Commerce William C. Redfleld ex
pressed the belief yesterday that It
would be "far better for the pockets
as well as the peace of mind of em
ployers" if they would work their men
only eight hours a day. He was speak
ing before the American Association
for Labor Legislation which is meet
ing here with the American Political
Science Association.
o?o?o
WORLD'S GOLD OUTPUT
REACHES $155,000,000
WASHINGTON, Jan. 3.?The Direc
tor of the Mint announced this morn
ing that the world's production of gold
for 1913 has been estimated at $455,
000,000. Of this amount the United
States produced $88,301,000, a reduc
tion of $8,000,000 in two years.
Among all the American States, Cal
ifornia stands first in the amount of
gold produced. Colorado is second and
Alaska third with $14,782,512.
JAPAN TO GCTAFTER
ATLANTIC COMMERCE
BOSTON, Jan. 3.?Shortly after the
opening of the Panama Canal three
steambship companies, subsidized by
the Japanese government, will start
a line of passenger and freight boats
between Toklo and Boston, calling up
on three ports enroute.
o?o?o
ATLANTIC RATE WAR
SEEMS INEVITABLE
LIVERPOOL, Jan. 3. ? Liverpool
Journal of Commerce declares an At
lantic rate war Is Imminent. British
and Continental lines are preparing to
meet Hamburg-American's cut In rates,
and pooling agreement may not be
renewed this month. A rate war seems
Inevitable.
O?0?o
CONFESSED MURDERER
AGAIN SENTENCED
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 3. ? Ralph
Ferris, whose sentence to death for
killing Horace Montague In the South
ern Pacific holdup affair, was set
aside by Judge Craig Wednesday was
re-sentenced today to be hanged at
San Quentln within 90 days.
PRESIDENT?HAS TWO
JOBS UP HIS SLEEVE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 3?President
Woodrow Wilson is said to have de
cided on two more members of the
Interstate Commerce Commission, one
from New York or New England, and
the other from the WesL

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