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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 13, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. m, NO. 357. JUNEAU, ALASKA. TUESDAY, JAN. 18, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
?"?? "? ? 11 ini/i mil
CHAMBERLAIN PRtDIU S WK ALASKA Kill
Thousands Dead Because
of Japanese Earthquake
NAGASAKI. Jau. 13. ? The death I
list resulting from the earthquake
around Kagoshima will run into
thousands. The city containing 60.-1
000 persons, is almost completely hur
ried in ashes and stones that were
thrown out from the belching volcan- e
oes. y
TOKYO. Jan. 13?Eathquakes on the e
island of Klushiu have resulted in the e
large loss of life and great damage to 8
property. Relief movements have been 1
started at the capital and other cen- 1
ters for the relief of those in the 1
stricken section. 1
t t , r
JURY ADJUDGES MEYERS E
GUILTY OF TRESPASS 8
???
The Jury, trying Jacob Meyers for''
trespass in the commissioner's court c
yesterday found defendant guilty and j a
Judge J. B. Marshall imposed a line '
of $50 and costs. It is probable that v
an appeal will be taken. The proper- 1
ty involved in the trespass is known f
as the Sheldon homestead. W. Christ-; b
ensen, the other defendant under the i1
same charge, asked until Thursday to j
move off the ground in question, and ^
his case was continued until Thurs-i'1
day. v
? , ? ? c
IN THE MUNICIPAL COURT 13
?l?
Three defendants charged with vio-|c
lating the anti-street speaking ordi- 1
nances were tried by Municipal Magia-;
trate E. W. Pettit yesterday. One who
was arrested the second time for the 1
same offense was fined $50 and sen-1a
tenced to 15 days in the municipal jail.'a
the other two were fined $60. All are!8
in Jail.
? ? ? Iv
ORPHEUM ANNIVERSARY.
One year ago today the Orpheum op- ''
ened its doors to the public as a first 1
class picture house and theatre and v
has fully succeeded iu maintaining thisi v
reputation. je
The management therefore takes
this occasion to show their apprecia- 1
tion, and thank their patrons for their ''
aid in sustaining this enterprise. The I
future policy and endeavor of the Or- *
pheum will be as in the past to pre- jv
sent to its patrons, as far as possible. ; ^
pictures of the highest class as pro-1
duced by the leading companies of the i
world.
The bill for tonight will consist of
two comedies and two dramas:
"The Better Man," a Vitagraph West- e
em drama features two of the best of *
this company's players, Robt. Thorn- 11
by and George Stanley, and carries a (
strong lesson of comparison. .?
"The Business Buccaneer," a Kalein a
drama of high finance and showing the |
results of discredited business meth- 1
ods. 1
"The Three Black Bags," is a Bunny '
comedy, of a bad mix-up. !'
"Starting Something." is a comedy 1
by the American Pathe company, and c
should be good. ?1
? ? ? I
OISTRICT COURT NOTES.
The grand jury reported two true (
bills this morning, both being indict- !
ments against Lawrence McCoy for '
larceny and burglary respectively. (1
Jack Bennet was bound over by'
Judge J. B. Marshall of the commis-j1
sioner's court yesterday for selling 1
liquor to Indians. :
Judge R. W. Jeanings has contin-,'
ued applications for naturalization one 1
week. '
GRAND THEATRE TONIGHT. 1
?In
complete change of program com
prising the latest photo plays.
"The Trap." Comet drama, that you
are sure to enjoy.
"Gaumont Weekly," interesting
events in the world, always good.
"The Boomerang,"?I Fear Not,
Tell Me All," Interesting drama by
the Thanhouser.
"The Deacon's Shoes" and "His Cook
Lady." laugable comedies.
Come and enjoy our show.
Even the cook eats at the Pioneer.
Opp. City Dock 12-20-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.: j
Maximum?34.
Minimum?32.
Precipitation?.25.
Cloudy, rain and snow.
PROGRESS OF PLANT
AT NUGGET CREEK
Great progress is being made on the
Uaska-Treadwell compnay's big hydro
electric power plant at Nugget creek,
fhich when completed, will be expect
d to generate 4,000 horso power of
lectrical energy and will have an to
talled power a little above this figure.
it the present time the first unit of
he plant is taking the natural flow of
he stream only, but with the comple
ion of the dam and the creating of the ]
eservolr for storage purposes the ca
acity will be greatly increased and. j
liven stability. ,
The dam is being built within 450 |
eet of the point under which "Nugget j
reek emerges from under the glacier <
nd is at an elevation of about 500
eet above the power house. The dam i
rill raise the water in the reservoir
hat is to be created 100 feet higher,
urnishing a good head for the tur- <
ines and an uninterrupted flow of wa
er. I
"The derricks and machinery," said <
leneral Superintendent R. A. Kinzie,
ust night, "are all on the ground and i
fe are now getting ready to put in the |
utoff for the big dam. One shaft has
ieen sunk to bedrock and pumps in- i
tailed and as soon as another shaft ]
an be sunk to bedrock the work of i
reaching out for the cutoff wall will <
tegin. i
"The machinery for a second unit in i
he power house has been installed
,nd has now been in use for more than i
month and everything is going along
atisfactorily out there."
W. R. Lindsay, superintendent in i
harge of the construction work at
?'ugget creek for the Alaska-Tread well <
ompany. Is now in Juneau and serv- :
ug on the grand jury. It Is expected i
hat the preliminary work at the dam i
fill progress far enough during the
.inter to get the dam itself completed
arly next summer. I
In the basin above the point where
he stream flows under the glacier the i
ilaska-Juncau expects to erect a large
>ower plant and use the water of Nug
;et creek before it reaches the levels
t-here It is picked up by the Alaska
rreadwell company.
ADVERSE COAL REPORT
WAS NO SURPRISE
- i
"I notice that the test of Bering Riv
r coal made recently by the United
Itates navy was not altogether favor
,ble to the Bering river," said Thomas
I. White, of Katalla, who was in town
Saturday night, enroute to Seattle as
i passenger on the Alameda.
"No one who knows anything about
he quality of coal that was mined by
he government expedition in the Ber
ng River field, Is surprised at the
.tatement that the coal did not meas
ire up to expectations. Of course it
lidn't. How could It? The 'coal'
niued consisted to a large extent of
?ocks and dirt, and these won't make
iteam. . I know what I am talking
tbout, for I helped to get out this
:oal for the government, and I made a
similar statement then as to the qual
ty of coal mined and freighted to tide
.vater at great expense.
"The whole business from Btart to
Jnlsh was a fiasco. Why I can take
i bunch of Indians and get out a thous
ind tons of coal from the Cunningham
troup at one-eighth the price that the
government paid for 800 tons or a good
ieal less of coal, rocks and dirt
"Of course the coal did not give sat
isfaction when tested. How could it.
i repeat?"
RUSTGARD ENDORES PLA N
OF WORKING PRISONERS
District Attorney Jobn Rustgard has
written a letter to Marshal H. L. Faulk
ner, endorsing the plan of working Fed
eral prisoners on the public highways.
The District Attorney says that he
has frequently recommended the same
thing and believes it will result in
good if done. He states that the pres
ent system encourages sriminals to
secure sentence for misdemeanors
where they can spend the time com
fortably idling in jail, and refers to
several instances where men have re
ceived as many as 8 and 10 sentences
to the Federal jail and one Instance
where the same individual has been
sentenced to the Federal jail 28 times.
Eat at the Pioneer, and die happy.
BIG FIGHT OVER
WATER RIGHT WAGES
The big light over the water rights
of Gold creek between the Alaska-Ju
neau Gold Mining company and the
Alaska-Ebner Gold Mines company et
al, is now on In earnest. A session
of the district court beginning at 8
o'clock last night and lasting until 11
marks the beginning of the Inquiry in
to the rights of the parties to the liti
gation. Last week the hearing of last
night was set on the application of the
plaintiff company for a temporary re
straining order pending the presenta
tion of testimony and trial on its mer
its. But in the meantime a second ap
plication for an injunction pending the
hearing of last night was not allowed
by the court at the Bhowing made Sat
urday night
Judge R. W. Jennings opened last
night's session by stating that the in
junction asked for Saturday was de
nied without prejudice and that the
court would now proceed with the
hearing on the application for a tem
porary restraining order pending a trial
of the case on its merits. He asked
counsel to confine themselves to such
testimony as would have a bearing on
the rights of the parties at Interest
without regard as to tbo question of
damages. ?
The plaintiff claims right to the wa
ter since August 1910 through two lo
cations and through the efforts to di- ?
vert the water which was successfully 1
done in October of that same year. It
Is alleged that prior to December 17.
1913, plaintiff has continued to use
said water for running Its air com- 1
pressor situated near Snowsllde gulch
near the portal of Its Gold creek tun- 1
nel. but that since the last named date,
defendants havo diverted the water
above the intake of plaintiff company
which water is not again returned to
the natural channel until below the in
take. Defendants allege prior rights !
both by location and use and by due
diligence in protecting those rights. 1
R. A. Kinzie. general superintendent '
of the Alaska-Juneau was the first wit
ness and was on the stand from a lit- 1
tie after 8 until past 11 o'clock, and ;
during the giving of his evidence en-1 i
tered quite largely into the history of j
the controversy over the use of the |
water rights at issue as well as the
history of the Alaska-Juneau mines
and the plans of the company and the
resulting damages that would be sus
tained If the injunction were not
granted.
A breath from the past was felt as
the story was told of the physical con
flict between employees of the rival
claimants of the water rights.
The hearing was continued until 8
o'clock tonight, and it promises to con
sume some considerable time.
INSANE MAN REPORTED
CRITICAL CONDITION
The marshal's office has been ad
vised by Deputy Marshal Davies, of
Ketchikan, that W. H. Flagell, adjudg
ed insane there, Is now in a critical
condition. The cable was rccolved too
late to give instruction in time to catch
the Al-Ki and there will be no boats
South for several days.
Flagell left Douglas on the last trip
of the Spokane and It is presumed that
he developed insanity aboard and was
put off at Ketchikan. At the time he
left Douglas he was enroute to Eng
land where he has a wife now living.
Taken Out on Al-Ki
Marshal H. L. Faulkner this after
noon received a cable from U. S. Com
missioner Stackpole at Ketchikan stat
ing that Fragall became violent while
aboard the Spokane enroute from
Treadwell to England and that on
complaint of Fred Bold, agent of the
Pacific Coast Co., was taken ashore
and tried for insanity Jan. 10, and be
ing committed to Morningsldc sanitar
ium by Commissioner Stackpole, Dep
uty Marshal Davies left with the pa
tient on the Southbound Al-Ki. The
patient is a British subject. On his
i person 5214 in cash and also two other
items of personal property were found
which were taken possession of by
Commissioner Stackpole who will ap
point a guardian for the patient. The
commissioner states that patient was
in a very bad physical and mental con
dition at the time he was committed.
NEW CORPORATION
FILES ARTICLES
?+?
Articles of incorporation for the Spo
kane Gulch Hydraulic and Develop
ment company have been filed with
Secretary Charles E. Davidson. The
directors are W. R. Morton, A. E. Grigs
by. F. W. Reed, William Finical, all
of Valdez. The capital stock Is placed
at $250,000. Valdez is the principal
place of business.
Fight Qver Washington
MarshalshipBecomesWarm
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?Many tel
egrams and letters arc being received
by the President and Attorney-Gen
eral protesting against the appoint
ment of John M. Boyle, of Tocoma, to
be United States marshal for West
ern Washington with headquarters at
Seattle, and the turning down of Geo.
E. Ryan, formerly Secretary of the i
State Central cojnmitte and active
party worker, whb has the endorse- i
I
ment of the State organization, Gov J
Ernest Lister, Mayor George F. Cot
terill, the heads of all the State depart
ments and leading citizens of the State.
Charles G. Helfner, the recognized
leader of the progressive element of
the Democratic party of Washington
State, who was endorsed by the State
for Secretary of the Interior, is here
on the ground and will personally in
tercede in a last effort to secure the
appointment of Ryan.
TRESPASS CASES
ARE ON TRIAL NOW
The first of the civil cases went to
trial in the district court at 10 o'clock 1
this morning. j
The Pacific Const company trespass i
cases wore begun and of soveral sim- (
liar cases on the docket wherein there i
are individual defendants, the first t
trial Is against John Bolstad for the
restitution of lot 2, block "Q," town of
Juneau, and for $5 per month rental
Bince plaintiff company was ousted.
The defendant claims undispted no- '
torlous and adverse possession for '
more than ten years past and that if '
plaintiff company' ever had n cause j
for action it is now barred by the stat- J
ute of limitations.
The following Jury is- trying the case: '
Fred Hebert, George Slmpkins, T. F.
Bush. K. O. Johnson. Sim Frolman, '
Milt Bothwell, Jerry Cashcn. John Day, j
Everett Bradford, Fred Anderson, H.
S. Graves, and J. G. Morrison.
Plaintiff company lays title to prop- J
erty from possession since 1881 and
from townsite trustee's deed made in
1888. It is alleged that the exterior
official survey of the townsite made in
1892 took in the property and there
after the subdivisional survey divided
the property into lots and blocks, that
the property was first deeded by the
government to the town trustee and i
by him to plaintiff company in 1898. I
The plaintiff's witness during the i
morning session were L. P. Shackle
ford. J. B. Marshall, and A. S. Dau- '
trick. I
The defense called Theodore Tor- i
genson, Isa Goldstein, John Wahl, An
drew Skavdal and John Bolstad, the
defendant.
It is expected the casa will go to
the jury this evening.
ESTATES ESCHEAT TO
THE UNITED STATES
Judge Fred M. Brown, of Valdez, de
cided last week that unclaimed ^estates
In Alaska escheat to the Federal gov
ernment rather than to the Territory
of Alaska. The decision was rendered
in a hearing over the question of the
distribution of the estate of Louis Ca
micia in which Attorney Charles E.
Bunnell appeared for the Territory and
Assistant United tSates District At
torney Guy Brubaker appeared for the
government.
The estate was valued at $5,000 and
there were no heirs to claim it.
AL. BAUSMAN RETURNING
WITH YOUNG BRIDE
AL Bausman, electrician with Alas
ka Light and Power-Co., is returning
from the South with a bride. Mr.
Bausman left for Seattlo on the Jef
ferson December 20. He wont direct
to Bremerton, at which place the wed
ding took place. They are on the
MnrlpoBa.
GROSS TO GIVE BENEFIT
FOR TRINITY CHURCH
The proceeds from the W. D.. Gross'
Grand theatre tomorrow evening, Jan
uary 14, will be devoted to Ladles'
Guild of Trinity church. The money
realized, will be used for the organ
fund of the church.
NO BASKETBALL TONIGHT
?BUT SATURDAY NIGHT
The basketball game between the
Douglas and Juneau high school teams
postponed from Saturday night last,
on account of stormy weather and
which was yesterday scheduled for to
night, has again been postponed and
the time fixed definitely for next Sat
urday night in the Douglas rink. The
hall could not be obtained tonight,
hence the change to next Saturday
night
SOLDIERS KICK FOR
PAY AND DIE
SAN DIEGO. Calif., Jan. 14?Twelve
rebellious Mexican Federal soldiers
were put to death yesterday at Ense
nada as traitors. The executions were
lue to a revolt caused by the failure
pf the government to pay the troops
it the Ensenada garrison.
Mexican Refugees To Be Kept
WASHINGTON. Jan. 13.?Secretary
jf War LIndley M. Garrison has or
lered the Mexican Federal troops who
crossed into the United States from O
llnaga and surrendered to the United
Statos border patrol to bo interned at
Port Bliss where they will be retained
is prisoners of war until after the war
,n Mexico shall have terminated. The
ireticaly they are captives of the Con
stitutionalists and will not be permit
ted to join in the war against their
presumptive captors. All told nearly
2,000 of such prisoners have come in
to the possession of the Americans.
MEASLES KILL THIRTY
WESTWARD NATIVES
VAI,DEZ, Jan. 13.?Capt. Creamer
reports that 16 natives have died at
Seldovia, and 14 at Kenal, from the
ravages of measles and that 35 famil
ies are destitute in Seldovla due to
the sickness that has prevailed. No
new cases of measles have developed I
during the 22 days last passed, but
there seems to bo no relief in sight;
for the destitute.
BIG STEEL PLANT
RESUMES OPERATIONS
CHICAGO, Jan. 13.?The American
Sheet & Tin Plate plant at Gary, em
ploying 1500 men, has resumed oper
ations. Resumption is on receipt of
orders sufficient to keep the plant run
ning for over a month. Increased
bookings are reported by the Gary
plants of the Illinois Steel and Amer
ican Bridge.
PRESIDENT RETURNS
TO WASHINGTON CITY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?President
Woodrow Wilson returned here today.
To beseeching way station crowds,
asking for a speech, he said:
"I am not in the habit of talking
when I have nothing to say."
JOHN SXELTON WILLIAMS
IS CURRENCY COMPTROLLER
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?President
Woodrow Wilson today nominated
John Skelton Williams, of Virginia, to
be comptroller of the currency.
FIRE DAMAGES FAMOUS
CANADIAN CATHEDRAL
MONTREAL, Canada, Jan. 13.?The
Notre Daine cathedral was badly dam
aged by Are today.
DANCE FOR JUNEAU
BASKETBALL TEAM
The Juneau basketball team of the
Juneau high school will give a dance
In Elks' hail Tuesday night Jan. 2C
to realize funds to help flnnnco the
club for its contemplated trip to Sit
ka. The best of music has been en
gaged and the hall will be beautifully
decorated for the occasion. Splendid
refreshments will be served and ev
erythlng done to Insure a good time
The committee having the affair lr
hand consist of C. Kashaveroff, S. Mc
Kinnon, D. Ericson, and Ed. Beattle
The fair co-eds have also signified thoii
intention of uniting to help make the
dance n most enjoyable affair.
Chamberlain Favors Public
Construction and Operation
EUROPE SUFFERING
FROM COLD WINTEF
PARIS, Jan. 13.?Central Europe 1)
experiencing the most sever? wlntei
that has occurred there in a genera
tlon. In Eastorn Russia more thai
150 persons have frozen to death sine*
the beginning of the cold weather tha
generally prevails throughout the con
tinen*
CHINA OFFERS JOBS TO
AMERICAN CONTRACTORS
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12. ? Hinti
have been thrown out at Peking thai
the United States would, if desired, b(
favored with an ample share of th<
railroad contracts now being dlstrlb
uted as a part of the Chinese govern
ment'8 development scheme.
PITTSBURGH BANK TO
RE-OPEN AT ONCE
PITTSBURGH, Pa., Jan. 12.?A vol*
of the stockholders to reopen the First
Second National Bank followed the an
nouncement that the stock had beer
over-subscribed. Two requirements re
mainlng are approval by the comptrol
ler of the currency and admission tc
the Pittsburgh clearing house.
According to the plan approved bj
the stockholders, all balances in sav
ings accounts and all other credits ol
less than $2,000 will be released and
placed on the same footing as before
the suspension.
Creditors having claims of $2,000 anc
upwards will have placed to their cred
it subject to check 50% of their claimt
and accept for the remainder certifl
cates of deposit bearing 3% internal
payable one year after the re-opening
The failure of this bank, on accoun
of the speculation of its ofllcers ir
Western lands came near resulting Ir
a panic.
OKLAHOMA WHEAT IS
IN GOOD CONDITIO?1
CHICAGO, Jan. 12?The Oklahomi
January crop report gives wheat con
dltion 103, against 83 a year ago, Thi
ground Is soaked and In the be3t o
condition.
HUNGARIAN MARRIES
WIDOW OF FRIENF
BUDAPEST, Jan. 13.?Franc.'s Kos
suth, the Hungarian patriot, was mat
! ried last night on his sickbed to Count
ess Benyorsky, widow of Alexande
Benyorsky, a close friend of Kossuth
STATE TO CARE
FOR CONVICTS' TEETI
WALLA WALLA, Wash., Jan. 14.
The State has ordered that an cxamir
ation of the teeth of all convicts an
their treatment by experienced dei
lists be made a part of the regula
work in the care of State convicts.
TUGS SEARCH FOR
SCHOONER NEAR SCOT
SEATTLE, Jan. 13.?Searching tug
are headed toward the vicinity of Cap
Scott in the belief that the disable
schooner Garms has been carried ii
to that region or toward the Alask
coast.
EXCITING RACE KILLS
LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEE1
SEATTLE, Jan. 13.?George S. Pe
ry, a locomotive engineer, died at th
throttle of the big engine that ws
driving the Chicago, Milwaukee an
St. Paul's "Olympian" train Just as
had finished a Ave mile race with th
Northern Pacific's "North Coast Lir
ited" train.
? ? * 1
CHARGED WITrttffiSANITY. .
i Harry Emile was taken from S
I Ann's hospital today by the marshal
> office and will be given a hearing c
? an insanity complaint
- COMMERCIAL CLUB MEETING.
[ Tho Juneau Commercial club wl
? meet in the city council chambers i
. 8 o'clock tonight. There are mar
i matters of Importance to come befo:
? the meeting.
Mrs. W. K. Zott is again able
) be about after an illness covering sc
eraldays.
?+?
Washington, Jan. 13.?Resuming
, his speech today on the Alaska
^ railroad bill, Senator Chamber
lain said that he believes the bill
* will soon pass the Senate.
r
' WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. ? Senator
1 George B. Chamberlain, of Oregon, in
1 opening the debate on the Alaska rail
1 road bill In the Senate yesterday recit
ed a great mass of statistics on Alas
ka's resources. He said that railroads
not In operation did very little to aid
the Territory because they are built
> to serve private Interests rather than
the public. He contended that the gov
* eminent should both build and operate
' the railroads.
Cummins Favors Government Coal.
i
Senator A. B. Cummins, speaking on
. the Alaska bill, reverted to the coal
question. He said that if the govern
ment could not furnish coal in any oth
er way at a better price than the con
; sumer now pays it should mine the
coal of Alaska as well as haul it.
s
Heifner Works for Alaska.
- WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. ? Charles
t G. Heifner, of Seattle, arrived here
- last night to work for the passage of
? the Alaska railroad bill and for a mens
> ure that will provide for the opening
of the Alaskn coal lands.
Smoot Introduces Leasing Bill.
f WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. ? Senator
I Reed Smoot, of Utah, introduced a bill
i in the Senate yesterday providing for
the leasing of Alaska coal lands and
I limiting the area that any one person
? or corporation can secure to 3,200
i acres. The bill provides a minimum
- royalty to the government of five cents
t a ton on the coal actually mined.
The bill will go to the committee on
t Territories which Is considering the
l Alaska coal lands question. It Is said
i to be the purpose of the committee
to have a coal lands bill ready to re
port out as soon ns the railroad bill
shall have been disposed of.
I
Pittman Introduces Leasing Bill.
i WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. ? Senator
? Key Pittman, chairman of t.;3 Senate
s committee on Territories, today Intro
f duccd a coal land leasing bill for Al
aska. It directs the Secretary of the
Interior to have the coal lands sur
veyed into even and odd numbered
) lots and to have the odd numbered lots
divided into quarter section tracts. It
i- also provides for the leasing to indi
?- viduais and corporations of tracts not
;? exceeding 2560 acres to any one per*
r son or corporation for 20 years. It
t. provides for a royalty based on the
gross value of the coal after the ex
penses of mining and transportation
I are deducted.
- AMERICANS MAY PLAY
i- FOR PANMA CANAL
d ?+?
i- NEW YORK, Jan. 13.?A Washing
r ton special says that President Wood
row Wilson and Secretary of State W.
J. Bryan are making extraordinary ef
forts to bring to au amicable settle
r mcnt the Panama Canal controversy
with Colombia and hope that an under
;s standing over an indemnity may be
e reached by Jan. 1, 1915, the date for
d! the ofllcial opening of the Panama
i- Canal to navigation,
a I ? ? ?*
MARY'S UMBRELLA CAME
NEAR BARRING QUEEN
R LONDON, Jan. 13.?QueOn Mary was
denied admission yesterday to the Nor
r- wich castle museum because she car
lo rled an umbrella. The Bishop of Nor
is wich intervened, disclosing the iden
d tlty of the Queen, who was immediate
it ly admitted with her umbrella.
ie ? ? ? ?
n- P.O. APPROPRIATION BILL
REPORTED TO HOUSE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13?The poBt
office appropriation bill, carrying an
It. appropriation of $305,000,000, was re
's ported to the House yesterday after
in noon.
W. E. WILCOX FINISHES
WITH FIRST NATIONAL
at W. E. Wilcox, national bank exam
ly iner at large for the Treasury Depart
re ment, finished his examination of the
First National bank of Juneau last
night and will take passago on the
to Mariposa tonight for Cordova enroute
v- to Fairbanks. He expects to return
within a few wocks.

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