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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 17, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 361. ' JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, JAN 17, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
? ? ? ? ? ? ? U 1 m fWK*. li M
SENATE WILL VOTE ON RAILROAD BILL JANUARY II
? ? . * 6
Another Earthquake
Shakes Japanese Island
KOCOSHIMA. Japan. Jan 17?Two (
further violent eruptions of the vol- >
cano Sakurajima accompanied by se
vere earthquakes took place this morn
ing. The sun looks like a ball of blood,
but gives no light. Night signals are
being used by the railroads. Ashes c
continue to fall over a wide area of n
the country. p
?
Little Change in Death List. c
TOKYO. Jan. 17.?The accepted es- 0
timate placed upon the number of dead 11
as the result of the earthquake due c
to the eruption of Sakurajima is 7.000. u
though it Is admitted that it is made p
upou far from accurate knowledge. '
?. ?. ? P
CITY COUNCIL ATTENDS
TO ROUTINE MATTERS c
The city council held its regular ?
session in the council chambers of the
city hall last night ?all being present
except Councllmen W. H. Case and
W. S. Pullen who are out of the city.
There was nothing of great importance 1
brought before the meeting and afterI
attending to some routine matters the
body adjourned. > (
1. E. Hensler. petitioned for the priv- ^
ilege of using a gasoline heater in the
Grotto saloon and it was granted. W.
W. Batheller asked for the same priv
ilege at 23S Seward street and it was r
also granted.
The Winter & Pond Co.. asked for (^
the privilege of substituting corrugat
ed iron flue for concrete or brick
chimney at a store which it is contem
plated to erect in front of the ware
house on the Pacific Coast dock. The 8
council declined to grant the privilege. a
The renewal of the insurance policy ^
on the city wharf was approved.
The Juneau Masonic lodge asked 8
permission to amend the survey of v
the Masonic plot in Evergreen ceme- a
tery. A resolution was passed provid- t(
ing for the same. a
l.abor claims to the amount ofi
$731.50 were allowed.
t , t t?
TO CONFER OVER |!
HOTEL ADDITION 1
^ ti
E. R. Jaeger, who together with C. t(
E. Ericson. owns the Hotel Cain build
ing will be leaving for the South on ^
one of the tirst boats, perhaps the Spo
kane. for the purpose of holding con
ference with Mr. Ericson. now in Se
attle. over the plans that have been 11
announced for a new steel and con- Jb
Crete addition to the present building.,s
"We expected to have work started on
the structure early in April." said Mr. ^"
Jaeger this morning, "but we are not *'
certain whether we will or not. It is | *
for this reason that Mr. Ericson and 8
I will meet and talk the matter over. 8
"The plan of increasing the capacity 1
of the Hotel Cain involves the erec- ^
tion of an addition holding fifty more '
rooms. The proposed structure is to 1
be built to the rear ol' the present 8
front, and be fire proof throughout. ?
There is no question of the need of '
more rooms for the hotel. The prob- s
lem is to get the structure finished in a
time for the spring and summer travel." 1
- - - ? i'-iM
INDIAN TOWN OF KAKE
ADOPTS CITY GOVERNM'T a
?+? v
The Indian village of Kake has com- s
menced to put on the ways of the! f
whites. Recently the 250 inhabitants s
created a town government by the '
election of a council and this body un- 6
der the direction of George J. Beck, su- 1
perintendent of missions at that place. J"
hase passed several improvement ordi- j
nances. The town has already com- I
menced making street improvements
and otherwise modernizing the com
munity.
The custom of living in tribal or
community houses is being discour- c
aged and many of the inhabitants are c
building individual family habitations. a
? ? ? l1
Juneau Chapter, No. 7. Order of the ir
Eastern Star, will give its first annu- jr
al ball on February 23. Invitations for
the event will be issued early in the i1
month. The Juneau branch of the or- 1
der is one of the youngest to be or
ganized in the North, having been per- v
fected only a few weeks ago. The first
big social event under its auspices is
being looked forward to with a great
deal of interest. '
THE WEATHER TODAY. i
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?30.
Minimum?21. i
Clear. P
lOURT HOLDS STREET
SPEAKING LAW VALID
Judge R. W. Jennings, at the con
tusion of the hearing yesterday after
toon, denied the writ of habeas cor
ius asked for in the case of E. C.
Jriggs, serving sentence by the muni
ipal court for violation of the city
rdiuance against street speaking. The
loints on which the habeas corpus pro
eedings were brought consisted in
challenge by the defense of the city's
owers to pass such an ordinance and
he right of the municipal court to
ass sentence without the defendant
aving a trial by jury. In denying the
rrit Judge Jennings holds that the
ity did and does possess power to
ass the ordinance in question and
hat the municipal court was within
is powers in passing seutence with
ut the trial by jury.
UGH SCHOOL TEAM
MAY MAKE TOUR
+
The Juneau high school basketball
earn is planning on making a tour of
he towns of Southeastern Alaska for
he purpose of meeting basketball
earns of the other communities. Ar
angements have been about complet
d to play a game at Sitka, and nego
iations are under way with the sol
iers at Fort William H. Seward and
he athletes of Sgakway and Ketchi
an.
The teachers encourage this sort of
port among the pupils of the schools,
nd point -to the wider view point
surs of the character of those planned
y the Juneau high school gives the
tudents. They become acquainted
rith other communities through them,
nd get a touch of that life which is
3 come to them when they quit school
nd go forth to act for themselves.
Of courser in part, at least, these
lans are dependent upon the Juneau
?am winning the championship from
le Douglas team. If they fail in that
te Douglas boys might prove more at
?active to the lovers of sport in other
)wns than those of Juneau.
ITRONG ARGUMENT
FOR MODERN ATHLETICS
???
Men must work and boys must play,
oth are physical necessities. Basket
all has been characterized as a most
enseless waste of time and energy.
. hasty conclusion. Many things have
o apparent value to the thoughtless?
: all depends upon the viewpoint,
[nowledge comes with growth and
trength. Physical decay is insepara
ble from mental decay. Drones acquire
he hookworm habit?some call It a
disease. An extended waistband is no
ndication of brain power. It only be
rays intemperance, whether worn by
aint or sinner, it tells of over-indul
ence in booze, chicken or perhaps only
nnnocent pie. Modern athletics is the
xeatest temperance advocate of the
,ge. In fact, it goes further and in
nany instances domands total absti
tence. The lad who wants to make the
earn must cut out indiscretions of diet
?nd go to bed nights, else his fellows
rill outstrip him in the race. No pos
lible influence will overcome this fea
ure of the game, and today every
chool boy knows it. It is a splendid
esson in self-control; a power, once
?xercised, that will give the future
nan a glorious confidence in himself.
-Douglas News.
A. J. DONNELLY SEEKS
ADMISSION TO BAR
?*?
Michael J. Donnelly, formerly of
-'airbanks, who served as messenger
>f the Senate during the first session
>f the Alaska legislature is seeking
idmission to the Juneau bar. Attor
ley H. B. LeFevre proposed his ad
nission and Judge R. W. Jennings this
norning appointed Attorneys R. A.
lunnison. L. P. Shacklcford and J. H.
*obb a committee to examine the ap
illcant.
SERGEANT B. F. HILL
GOES TO PETERSBURG
Sergeant B. F. Hill, of the local ca
de office force, has received orders to
to to Petrsburg on the first South
toing boat. He will leave on the Spo
kane.
New "Steel Cap" chisels; sells at
jight, try them. Stanley Bed Rock
lanes, at GASTINEAU HARDWARE.
McCOY sentence ,
is suspended
?4.?
Lawrence McCoy was given a sus
pended sentence by Judge R. W. Jen
nings of the district court this morning
on the two Indictments of larceny and
burglary respectively. The court made
a very effective address telling the boy
that on account of his mother and his
own youth that he would give him a *
chance. Judge Jennings drew a graph- 1
lc picture of the end that awaits those '
who take the downward and criminal 1
career, pictured the horror of prison 1
life and impressed the fact that If he '
were not a good boy that he would "
be brought ba?k even from the ends
of the earth and made to serve the
sentence that was being suspended.
The court told him that if he were to
live a thousand years and coutlnucd
doing good he could not repay the ^
aged mother for all that she had done
for him. *
Mrs. McCoy, who was In the court 1
room with her son at the time, was <
visibly affected. After thanking the ?]
court she left with her son with tears (
streaming down her face.
Watson Gets Three Months.
Sam Watson, who plead guilty to 8
two indictments for selling liquor to 1
Indians was, after being questioned
and establishing that it was his first
offense, given a sentence of three '
months in the Federal Jail for each In
dictment the time for each sontence,
however, to run concurrently.
Sullivan, Six Months.
Harvey Sullivan, who plead guilty
I to the indictment for selling liquor to *
: Indians, was sentenced to six months t
in the Federal Jail. - He was convicted t
last term and shortly after getting out c
J got drunk and fell again.
I GRAND JURY SAYS NOT A 't
TRUE BILL FOR JUUSOLA j1
??? ,1
Gust Guusola will not have to stand
trial for the killing of G. Lassila at '
| Tenakee. December 22nd last. The .8
, grand jury this morning returned not:v
la true bill in his case and he was re- N
, leased from custody. The tragedy oc- 8
I curred in a cabin at Tenakee and there *
i were no witnesses present. The de- 0
j fendant claimed at the hearing that it |1
i was done in self-defense. United States 11
| Commissioner J. B. Marshall bound the '
defendant over to await the action of
j the grand Jury. 1
> ? r 8
TORGENSON CASE n
GOES TO THE JURY a
The trespass suit of the Pacific a
Coast company against Theodore Tor- t
[genson, the third action of a similar;s
I nature, was given to the Jury at 313
o'clock this afternoon, the arguments!
being concluded at 2:30. There are {
two more suits of this nature on the j
calendar.
RAYMOND PLEADS GUILTY. c;
J. C. Raymond this morning entered r
a plea of guilty to the indictment t
charging obtaining money under false i
pretense, and this afternoon he was i
sentenced by Judge R. W. Jennings to i
six months in the Juneau jail. ! i
Others Plead Guilty.
Charles Davenport. Charles Smyth <
and Jchn Harris each entered pleas of
guilty to the indictment charging them
with selling liquor to Indians and will
be sentenced this afternoon. t
At 3:30 p. m. Judge Jennings sen- <
tenced Davenport to 16 months in the i
McNeil's Island penitentiary. This <
was Davenport's third conviction, and i
Judge Jennings reprimanded him se- i
verely when pronouncing sentence.
? ' * <
TWO TRUE BILLS. i
The grand jury this morning re- l
turned two true bills for selling liquor ]
to Indians. One indicts Charles Brown, i
the other, Willis Hoolis. 1
PLEAD NOT GUILTY. i
Henry Cooman entered a plea of
not guilty tbls morning to the Indict
ment charging him with sending un
mailable matter through the United
States mail. ? 1 I
William Kim this morning entered f
a plea of not guilty to the indictment !
charging him with selling liquor to In
dians.
Paul Brown, an auburn-haired In
dian, also entered a plea of not guilty ;
to the indictment charging him with
selling liquor to Indians.
FOR SALE ? Two or three good '
horses. Write or call on Capt. Geo.
E. Goodrich. 30th Infantry, Quarter
master, Fort William H. Seward. 17 2t
HINTS TO THE WISE?U-Nq Lini
ment for all rheumatic and other pains.
J. W. Doran'e Drug Store. 1-15-tf
Congress May Eliminate
"Rule of Reason" Opinion
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?Reperson
atlve Augustus O. Stanley, of Kon
ucky, following u inference with
'resident Woodrow .MfllBon introduced
i bill in the House of Itepresontatives
unending the Sherman anti-trust law
which would mako Illegal monopoliza
tion in restraint of trade "in any de
gree." The amendment is designed to |
eliminate the "rule of reason" laid!
down by the Supreme Court in the j
Standard Oil case.
'
rWO SENSATIONAL
SUICIDES AT 'FRISCO
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 17.?Blanche
,Vood. aged 24 years, last night shot
lerself to death in the presence of her
incle, A. B. Wood, said to be a form
er member of the Supreme Court of
rennessce living under an assumed
/
mme. oWod immediately after his
ilece had killed heQielf seized the
lame gun that she had used nnd took
lis own life.
* ' **'!
tVEAI HER REVEALS
SEWARAGE DEFECTS
Tho long periods of clear weather
hnt have prevailed in Juneau this win
er are serving to make more than
(ver noticeable the . defects of the
.ity's sewer system.? Tho matter is
telng discussed by buj^ness men, and,
t is said, women are discussing the
ormation of civic society which would
ake that matter up us among the first
hings worthy of receiving attention.
"The stench on Front street, result
ng from the depositing of the city's
lewage on the tide lands under the
vharves and buildings of the city's
vaterfront, is becoming nauseating,"
aid a leading Juneau merchant in
liscussing the matter today. "The
:ity is in danger of an epidemic of
yphoid fever," he continued, "as long
is this condition is permitted to con
inue."
Suggesting a remedy, this business
nan said that the cit? should make a ?
iea wall by spiking planks to the piles'
it about the low tide mark, extend the i
lewers below it and compel those j
lumping refuse into tho bay to dOj
0 beyond the wall. He said then that!
he earth from excavations in the city!
ihould be used to fill in the ground
ibove the wall.
? ? ? |
}. D. CHARLES WILL
LOCATE IN JUNEAU
?+?
'Sidney D. Charles, formerly of Cor
lova, a well known Alaska newspa
>er man, who has been in Juneau for
1 month, will Joia the editorial staff
)f the Dispatch. He leaves for Cor
lova on the Admiral Sampson, due to
norrow, and will return with his fam
ly and become a permanent Juneau
eBident.
SOLD CREEK WATER
SUIT STILL LINGERS
The hearing on the application for
i temporary restraining order In tho
:ase of the Alaska-Juneau company
igainst the Alaska-Ebner company ov
?r the right to the Gold creek water
s still being conducted at night ses
sions of the district court.
The defense is still putting in evi
lence. Last night several witnesses
vcro called. F. J. Wettrick, J. M. Carl
son and Dan Roardon were recalled.
L G. Hill, Halverson, A. Rlendean and
D. D. Muir followed In succession. It
s not known at this time how much
more evidence the defense will put on.
rhe plaintiff will offer some rebuttal
and the case will probably run well in
to next week.
WINDHAM BAY NOTES.
WINDHAM. Jan. 15.?G. Sutton, the
trapper, came down from Shuck yes
terday. He reports that he has been
having poor luck this winter.
Dick Row?,' Jw, contemplates making
a trip to Juneau soon.
Capt. Orr is making the plans for a
new residence for himself.
Mr. Ketchmark and Mr. Kelder were
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Rowe, of this
place, Sunday. Saturday they with
Miss Rowe were guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Yates.
Mrs. York, wife of James York, who
conducts a fox ranch near Sumdum,
arrived in Juneau yesterday accom
panied by her sister and they have ta
ken rooms at the Occidental hotel.
FEDERAL GEN. OROZCO
AMONG THE DEAD
WASHINGTON", Jan. 17.?Word re
ceived here today that Gen. Orozco,
one of the Federal commanders of
Northerp Mexico is dead. The infor- [
matlon wau contained in the report of J
Gen. B1I8S of the arrest of Gen. Sal-1
azar. |,
"Gen. Orzco was one of the most ef- j
fectlve officers with Modero in his suc
cessful war against Diaz. Later he
quarreled with Madero, but remained
a supporter of his government After
Mudero's death he allied himself with
Huorta.
Money Short In Mexico.
NEW YORK, Jan. 17? A Mexico
City special says that the financial I
situation there is a great hardship to;
all business men. Shortage of small1
change makes trading extremely dlffl- j
cult. The American Smelting & Re
fining company has put into circula
tion bonds of small denominations for,
the purpose of paying its employees.
These bonds are redeemable at the;
National Bank.
ALL-SUMMER SESSION
AMONG POSSIBILITIES <
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?Another
all-summer session of Congress is in
prospect, according to those intouch
with the legislative program of Preai-; i
dent Woodrow Wilson. This will prob
ably be made imperative by a number
of big questions which will be put up
to Congress, Including legislation con
cerning the trusts, rural credits, pro- ,
hlbition of gambling in cotton futures, -(
construction of an Alaskan railway and (
the control of water power rights. ,
SAN FRANCISCO AFTER
SPRING VALLEY WATER
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 17. ? The
city of San Francisco has started a
condemnation suit for the purpose of |
acquiring at a Just price the property
of the Spring Valley Water Co., val
ued at between $35,000,000 and $40.
000,000. It is the largest condemna
tion suit on record. '
BUTTE CONTRIBUTES
ANOTHER TEN THOUSAND
?+?
BUTTE, Mont., Jan. 17?The Miners*
Union of this city has wired another
$10,000 contribution to the Michigan
strikers. This makes the total sub
scribed by the miners of Butte to the
strikers of Michigan since the walk
out $83,000.
WOOLEN TRUST'S FIRST
CUT IS 7 PER CENT.
NEW YORK, Jan. 16?The American
Woolen company opened its 1914 fall
sale of overcoatings with a cut of seven
percent, from former prices for the
same qualities of goods.
?> ? ?
VIRGINIA AFTER WILL
OF MARTHA WASHINGTON
RICHMOND, Va.. Jan. 17.?A bill j
wift be Introduced in the Virginia Leg
islature instructing the Attorney-Gen
eral of the State to sue for the pos-!
session of the will of Martha Washing
ton, wife of the first President, which
has been located in the library of J.
P. Morgan. The will was stolen during
the Civil War from the records of Fair- j
fax County, Virginia. It was lately
discovered that it was in the Morgan j
collection and a demand for Its restor
ation was refused, though Mr. Morgan
said thnt he would furnish authenticat
ed photogragraphlc reproductions of
It.
NEW BASEBALL LEAGUE
IS AFTER TY COBB|
CHICAGO, Jan. 17. ? The Federal
Baseball League club of this city has
offered Ty Cobb, the famous Dotroit
player and generally regarded as the
greatest baseball player in the world,
a contract for five years at a salary
of $15,000 a year to play with it.
Senators Unanimously
Agree to Act Thursday
SUBMARINE CREW j
PROBABLY PERISHEDi;
? 1 11
PLYMOUTH, England, Jan. 17.?The f
submarine craft that went to the bot- j,
torn yesterday morning and failed to j
rise is still resting on the bottom. It i
is probable that all on board have per- i
Ished.
i
ILLINOIS MANUFACTURERS!
FAVOR HIGHER RATES
CHICAGO, Jan. 17. ? The Illinois ,
Manufcaturem' Association, which op- ,
posed the railroad rate advances in! i
1910, has sent to its 15,000 members,!1
Including many of the largest shippers (
In the West, the fololwlng request: j
"Wire the President, wire your Sena- \
tors, wire your Representatives to use ,
their influence for a Ave percent, hori- j
zontal raise In freight rates in ofllcial (
classification territory. Make business
boom."
I
YOUNG ASTOR WILL
BUILD NEW THEATRE
NEW YORK, Jan. 17.?Vincent As
tor will build a theatre seating 3000 .
at the corner of Broadway and Nine
ty-Fifth street, to be leased by B. F. j'
Keith.
NEW YORK TELEPHONE j
SYSTEM TO BE VALUED ,
NEW YORK, Jan. 17. ? The New j
York public service commission has de
cided to make a physical valuation of
the properties of the New York Tele
phone company for the purpose of fix- (
ing rates. t
1
SNOW COVERS FRANCE ; i
THREE FEET DEEP >
PARIS, Jan. 17.?Southern France i
Is covered with snow to a depth of 11
from one to three feet. The tempera-, i
ture continues low, and the sufTereingji
Df the unprepared people Is intense.|'
The hardships and business difllcul- j I
ties are exceedingly depressing.
CHARLEY GATES' WILL
ADMITTED IN TEXAS
BEAUMONT, Tex., Jan. 17 ? The
will of the lute Charles G. Gates *was ]
admitted to probate here yesterday, i
and appraisers of tho Gates' estate in i
Texas were appointed.
SAILORMAN MUST TRY TO
SUPPORT HIS WIFE
CHICAGO, Jan. 17. ? Albert Hors
will who had charge of the last life
boat to leave the Titanic told the
court yesterday in a hearing that he
is unable to support his wife, aged 18
years, whom he married last Novem
ber. Judge Uhlir ordered him "to
stay on the job" and do the best that
he can.
'FRISCO TRANSIT LINES
GIVE INSURANCE POLICIES
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 17. ? The
United Railroads, of San Francisco,
has presented to 1587 employees life
insurance policies aggregating $1,250,
000.
BANKRUPTS PASS THE
20,000 MARK IN 1913
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?Since the
Federal bankruptcy act went into ef
fect on July 1, 1898, 20,307 petitions in
bankruptcy have been filed in the
United States District Court; 1,327
petitions were filed in six months to
Dec. 31, 1913.
MORGAN TO STAY
WITH STEEL TRUST
NEW YORK. Jnn. J7.?J. P. Morgan
said Fridny afternoon that ho proposed
to remain a director of the United
States Steel Corporation. His mem
bership on the bank boards would be
dependent, he added, on construction
of the director's liability clause of the
currency law.
"The members of the firm," he said,
"are not resigning from boards because
of pique or annoyance, but simply be
cause, hs explained in our earlier state
ment, we believe the course best for|
the investors in the corporations and
accordingly the best interests of the
firm."
WASHINGTON, Jan. 22.?The Unit
ed States Senate reached an unani
mous agreement today to vote on the
Chamberlain Alaska railroad bill next
Thursday?January fl2. The agree
ment was reacncd easier than wah ex
acted after the failure yesterday after
noon.
Supporters of the measure say that
It will pass with ease. Practically all
of the Western and Southern Sena
tors will vote for it.
Committee Consider Amendments.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?An effort
to fix Tuesday as the time for a vote
nn the Alaska railroad bill failed yes
terday afternoon. The committee on
Territories is meeting today to con
sider amendments?one of them, by
Senator Miles Poindexter, of Washing
ton, would empower the President to
establish a complete system of rail
?r,d river transportation* for Alaska
connecting with ocean steamship lines.
GARMS AND CREW
SAFE ON SOUND
?+?.
SEATTLE, Jan. 17.?The schooner
W. F. Garms, with six of her crew
iboard, in tow of the tug Goiiab, ar
rived- here today.
The U. S. reveue cutter Snohomish
ivltb Capt. Turloff and five members
)f the crew of the W. F. Garms arrived
it Port Townsend this afternoon.
INCOME TAX IS
PRODUCING THE MONEY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17?Treasury
jfiicials declare absurd the report that
:he government is preparing to issue
bonds for fear the income tax will
fail short of producing the expected
revenues. Returns from income tax
ire expected to be so large that, in
stead of issuing bonds, the Treasury Is
more likely, officials say, to consider
:alllng in the balance of the 3s out
standing, $64,000,000 in round figures,
which can be done at option of the
Secretary.
COL. GORGAS TO BE
SURGEON-GENERAL
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?President
Woodrow Wilson has tentatively se
lected Col. W. C. Gorgas to bo Sur
geon-General of the United States
irmy.
Gorgas Nominated.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?President
Woodrow Wilson this afternoon nom
inated Col. W. C. Gorgas to be Sur
geon-General.
Helohan to be U. S. Marshal.
The President also nominated James
B. Helohan to be United States mar
shal for the Northern district of Cal
ifornia.
NO WOMAN SUFFRAGE
COMMITTEE FOR HOUSE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?The Dem
ocratic members of the House rules
committee decided today that it will
not create a standing committee on
woman suffrage at this session of Con
gress.
SKAGWAY PIONEER'S
DAUGHTER IS WED
?+?
SKAGWAY. Jan. 15? Phil Abrahams
received the announcement this morn
ing of the marriage of his daughter,
Alice Graham Abrahams, to Dr. W. J.
Wright. Edmonton, Alberta. The mar
riage took place at the Holy Rosary
church, Portland, Oregon, on Dec 31.
The bride formerly lived in Skng
way, where she was a favorite In the
younger set, and the announcement
of her marriage will be a surprise to
her frlendB here.
She left last fall to go outside on
a visit, but gave no intimation of her
intention to get married.
The gentleman whom she married
is a rising young eye specialist of Ed
monton.?Skagway Alaskan.
NEW YORK BANK TO
ABSORB TRUST COMPANY
NEW YORK. Jan. 17.?The Corn
Exchange Bank of New York Is to ab
sorb the Washington Trust company
and operate It as a branch.
Empire want ads get results.

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