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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 02, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III.. NO. 374. JUNEAU, ALASKA. MONDAY, FEB. 2, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
?- ' ' :
TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES PLEAD GUILTY TODAY
Grand Jury Wants Laws
Rigorously Enforced
In its final report, the grand jury
that has been in session at Juneau
since the early part of last month,
made some stringent recommendations
as to the enforcement of the laws reg
ulating the liquor traffic; that the of
fice of the United States Commission
er at Wrangell be investigated; that
saloons should be required to keep a
public record of all sales of liquor pur
chased for consumption oft the prem
ises; that United States Marshal H. L.
Faulkner's recommendation that pris
oners should be required to labor upon
public works should be carried out;
that the United States commissioner
at Juneau should be authorized to in
dex the records of his office down to
the year 1S90; that grand jurors should
be paid $5 a day; that there be uniform
school books provided for whole Ter
ritory, and it exteuded its thauks to
the turt and the district attorney's
offl' "or assistance rendered to the
Jur
Jury is Discharged.
<?r being in session for 19 days,
ac og upon 67 cases?19 of which
w? e original investigations?the grand
Jt submitted its final report this
n ing^ and was discharged. The
j returned 55 indictments and 12
) .rue bills.
"lie jury examined 243 witnesses
employed two interpreters.
Judge R. W. Jennings complimented
and thanked the grand jury for the
faithful manner in which it discharged
i?s work.
Liquor Traffic Recommendations ..
The grand jury recommendations
concerning the liquor traffic follow:
"We recommend that the law against
the sale of liquor by saloons to minors
and to habitual drunkards be rigidly
and stringently enforced.
"It has been officialy brought to our
notice repeatedly during our session
here that the prostitutes in all of the
towns within this Division are habit
ually following the practice of selling
liquor to men who come to their places,
and even to minors. This practice is
not only reprehensible but is so clear
ly criminal that the only explanation
we have been able to find for the fail
ure of the officials to prosecute offend
ers is that they have felt that the sen
timent of the community was not such
as to support or bring about convic
tions. but in this we are fully con
vinced the officials are now in error,
whatever may have been the facts in
the past; and we strongly recommend
that the laws in this regard be en
forced to the letter, and we believed
that the sentiment in the communi
ties of Southeastern Alaska is in favor
of such enforcement and that convic
tions for violations of the law can be
obtained.
"It is matter or common Knowledge
that In some of the saloons in Juneau
and Douglas men are to be found at
practically any hour of the night or
morning in a state of beastly, helpless
Intoxication, and we are firmly con
vinced that the sentiment of these
communities is wholly in favor of such
an enforcement of the laws now on the
statute books as will entirely do away
with this condition of things.
"And we further recommend that the
present laws relating to the sale of
liquor be supplemented by a statute
requiring that all saloons keep a reg
ister in writing of all sales of liquor
where the same is to be carried or Is
carried away from the premises and
not drunk on the premises, and that
such register shall record the date of
such sale, the person to whom made,
and the quantity and kind of liquor and
the price paid therefor, and that said
registers be open to Inspection, dur
ing all business hours, by United
States and Territorial officials author
ized to enforce the laws relating to
the sale of liquor; and that such stat
ute impose a penalty for failure to
keep such a record accurately."
CATHOLIC MEN MEETING.
Wednesday. Feb. 4. 8 p. m.. all th?
Catholic men will meet in Fathet
Drathman's residence to organize a
Catholic society.
Mrs. S. L. Burton and her sistet
Miss A. F. Williams were passengers
on the Southbound Northwestern.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
?+?
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?33.
Minimum?23.
Cloudy and snow.
JUNEAU YOUNG COUPLE
UNITED IN MARRIAGE
Miss Donna Beardon and Mr. 0. W.
Leafgreen of Juneau, were united in
marriage by Judge J. B. Marshall at
. 10 o'clock Saturday evening, January
'31, in the apartments of S. H-Mllwee.
in the Seward building. There were
no guests present except the witnesses
; to the ceremony, Mr. S. H. Milwee and
Miss Pearl Wagoner. Immediately af
ter the ceremony a wedding supper
was served at the home prepared for
the young couple in the Rankin apart
ments. Both of the contracting par
ties are very popular in Juneau and
have been burdened with the good
wishes of hosts of friends.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. S. W. Beardon of LaGrsnde, Ore.,
and came to Juneau last June. The
bridegroom has lived in Junean far
more than three' years and has for
the past two years been in charge of
the clothing and gentlemen's furnish
ing department of the Charles Gold
stein stores.
BOWLING TOURNAMENT
MAY BE ARRANGED
Plans are developing for a bowling
tournament between teams represent
ing Juneau. Treadwell, Skagway,
Whitehorse and Fort William H. Sew
ard. Whether the games will be
played by wire, each team working on
j i?j own alley, or by a series of visits
of teams representing the different
towns to the other towns participat
ing has not been decided. The matter
was taken up Saturday evening by Ju
neau Elks with W. C. Blanchard, one
of the leading bowlers of the Skag
way Elks, who is in Juneau.
The team representing Fort William
H. Seward won the last tournament
that was participated in by teams of
the North
DISTRICT COURT NOTE8.
Nakane Guilty.
The jury trying Jack Nakane for the
crime of selling liquor to Indians
brought in a verdict of guilty Satur
day night.
Chullck Plead* Guilty.
Spiridon Chullck. indicted for the
crime of larceny from a dwelling, this
morning entered a plea of guilty in
the district court.
Secret Indisctment.
The grand jury this morning brought
in another secret indictment.
VALDEZ SCHOOL TEACHER
WILL REMAIN IN JUNEAU
Miss E. Clementine Walgrcn, a
friend of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Vaut, of
Juneau, and who has been teaching
school in Valdez for the past two years
arrived in Juneau on the Northwestern
and has taken apartments at the Hotel
Cain. Miss Walgren has decided to
make her home in Juneau.
AGENT LYONS OFF
ON MONTH'S VACATION
Charles T. Lyons, agent for the Al
aska Steamship company at Skagway
is now enjoying the first few hours
of his annual vacation. Accompanied
I by Mrs. Lyons he is aboard the North
western enroute to the States. They
: expect to be gone about four weeks.
? ? ?
NORTHWESTERN TAKES
FEW SOUTHBOUND
The Northwestern, arriving from the
Westward at an early hour yesterday
morning took the following passengers
1 from Juneau: Mrs. H. Fay. W. H. Ham
11 fer. Miss G. Shanklin, Mrs. S. L. Bur
ton, Miss A. F. Williams. W. DeLong>
i1 H. L. Bebout and wife, Harry Cassles,
| H. G. Weir, P. E. Mickelson.
j W. C. Blanchard, chief clerk to the
j president and general manager of the
White Pass & Yukon Route, arrived
> in Juneau, and will remain here until
? the next sailing North.
i ? ? ?
THREE NOTABLES DIE
IN STATES YESTERADY
NEW YORK. Feb. 2 ?Gen. James
Grant Wilson, soldier, editor and au
thor died here yesterday.
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 4. ? Charles
E. Dana, the artist, died here yester
day.
BREMERTON. Wash., Feb. 2.?Dr
Carrie E. Logan, niece of the late Gen
John A. Logan, died here last night
ALASKA EBNER WINS
GOLD CREEK CASE
?+?
Judge R. W. Jennings this morning
rendered his decision In the Injunc
tion suit filed by the Alaska-Juneau
Gold Mining So. against the Alasku
Ebner Gold Mines Co. et al to restrain
the defendants from taking the water
from Gold creek. The decision finds
for the defendants.
The court hold that the plaintiff Com
pany was not entitled to an injuctlon
pending a trial of the cause on Its
merits. From evidence adduced the
court finds that the defendant, Alaska
Elmer Gold Mines company, was first
to give notice of Its Intention to take
the water from Gold creek and apply
It to beneficial use and 6ince that time
had used due diligence In the conduct
of Its work toward that end up to the
time of the beginning of the action.
MARSHAL L. T. ERWIN
TAKES PRISONERS OUT
* -
Marshal L. T. Erwln, of Fairbanks,
and assistants, arc aboard the North-;
wetstern with prisoners enroute to
McNeil's Island penitentiary and to
the asylum at Morningside. The fol
lowing are the prisoners and the
causes of their commitment: William
McKlnzie, S. Dockham, Harry Wendll.
insane, enroute to Morningside; Frank
Alblni, life sentence McNeil's island,
for murder of Steve Barossco; George
Foss, sentenced 12 years McNeil's Isl
and, larceny; William Miller, 5 yers J
MceNlIs' Island, larceny; Emit Hart
man, 5 years McNeil's island, assault
with dangerous weapon; Walter!
| Moore, one year McNeil's island, ob-!
J talnlng money under false pretenses.
? ? ?
JOHN F. PUGH IS NOW
COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS
John P. Pugh became collector of
customs for Alaska yesterday morning
when he took the oath of office, ad
ministered by his brother-in-law. Unit
ed States District Jugde Robert W.
Jennings. Mr. Pugh was appointed I
j to the office last November, and was
confirmed by the Senate before Its ad
journment for the special session.
[ The appointment of Mr. Pugh was
' a promotion. He has been in the cus
! toms Bervlce for many years^ and, it
Is said, is the only Democrat in the
service.
J.H.S. BAND HAS NEW
REHEARSING QUARTERS
| The J.H.S. band will meet for prnc
I tice tonight in the Ore hall In the city
hall building at 8 o'clock. The band,
'through the efforts of Mayor C. W.
[carter and Fire Chief Milt Winn, has
been granted the privilege of using the
Arc hall in the city hall building two
evenings of each week for band re
hearsals. The manager of the C. W.
Young company has loaned the band
; boys folding chairs to be placed in the
i hall for their use. Lockers are to be
i built for music, instruments and other
< band paraphernalia. The band has
! been without practlco for the last six
I or eight weeks on account of ino suit
! able place in which to meet
I1K-:
!MERRY DEL VAL SUCCEEDS
RAMPOLLA AT ST. PETERS
ROME, Feb. 2.?Merry Del Val yes
terday assumed the position of arch
priest at St. Peter's, succeeding Ram
polla.
CORPORATIONS NOT
EXEMPTED IN NEW LAW
Edgar C. Raine, deputy collector of
internal revenue for the district of
Washington and Alaska, this rooming
stated that under the provisions of the
Income tax law, corporations no longer
have the $5,000 exemption, but are re
quired to pay one per cent, on the en
tire net income.
The returns of both individuals and
corporations to the tax must be in the
office of Internal Revenue Collector Da
vid J. Williams at Tacoma. Washing
ton. before March 1 of each year In
cluding 1914. In cases where individ
uals have net incomes which just reach
the amount of exemption, they must
make returns of such incomes and
claim exemption.; -i :.:i . .
In case any person liable for said
tax has not received thq necessary
blank on which to make the return,
? the same will be furnished on appli
cation to Mr. Raine at the Hotel Cain,
, Juneau.
Mrs. M. K. Struble, the Juneau ae
i countant and stenographer, left on
the Georgia yesterday for Sitka where
she goes to assist Prof. C. C. George
, son in the preparation of his annual
, statement for the year. She will re
, turn to Juneau.
KERN TALKS TO "
MINE WORKERS
IND1ANAFOLI8. Ind., Feb. 2. ?
Speaking bote Saturday night before
the United 'Mlno Workers, Senator
John W. Kern, Democratic leader in
the United States Senate, said that he
brought to tho workingmen a mess
age of good will from both sides of tho
Uulted State:; Senate. Ke counseled
harmony and temporato action In all
things, declaring tho present to be a
crucial tlmo for organized labor.
SUEERAGETTES SNUB
PRESIDENT WILSON
WASHINGTON. Feb. 2.?President
Wood row Wilson was snubbed today
by 300 working women when he told
them that he could give them no en
couragement in connection with a re
quest that they had just made t o se
cure his support In favor of a consti
tutional amendment enfranchising the
women of the United States. The wom
en passed single file before the Pres
ident and many of them refuse4 Jo
take his proferrcd hand.
? ?V f
JUDGE J. Y. OSTRANDER
IS GOING SOUTH ILL
Judge John Y. Ostrander of Valdez
is a passenger on tho Southbound
Northwestern cnrcute to Seattle for
treatment. He Is very 111, according
to report. Mrs. Ostrander Is with
him.
ARRIVALS IN NORTH WE8TERN
The Northwestern, arriving from
the Westward Sunday morning at 3:00
o'clock, brought the following passen
gers for Juneau:
From Valdez?J. R. Guerrin, E. M.
Kempeer, Miss E. Clementine Wal
gren.
From Cordova?William Reappo, Ax
el Olson.
From Skagway?Ernset Walker, A.
VanMavern.
JUNEAU ELKS TO
HAVE SOCIAL EVENING
The Elks are giving another of their
popular social evenings, Friday, Feb.
6th, commencing at 8:30 p. m., for
Elks and their Indies. All visiting Elks
in the city are cordlaly Invited, and
I will be admitted by card. Banquet at
11:30. The Juneau orchestra will fur
nish music.
ALASKAN HOTEL ARRIVALS.
The following arrivals are registered
at the Alaskan Hotel:
H. B. Wallace, Bruce C. Shorts, W.
B. Strntton, W. H. Bogle, D. I. Molr,
Gorge B. Fre'dcll, A. M. Goodman, Se
attle: J. L. Perevlch, E Miller, P. Paul
| son, Bob Frisco, S. Stamlch. city, Vic
tor Sicott, Cordova; H. W. Marsh,
Whltehorse: W. F. Elliott, Chicago.
OWNERS OF WRECK SUE
COLLIDING STEAMSHIP
NORFOLK. Va., Feb. 2.?The own
ers of the Monroe, which sunk as the
! result of n collision with the Nantuck
| ot last week, have brought suit in the
Federal court against the Nantucket
for $1,000,000, alleging the loss of life
and the vessel to be due to the care
lessness of the officers of the Nantuck
et.
?
I <1>. ?
I I
PERSONAL MENTION I
I 1
| ?$?_ ??- . .1 i 4*
Ralph Schmidt, the Alaska repre
sentative of a San Francisco and Se
attle wholesale hardware house left
on the Spokane for the South.
W. F. Whltely, well known insur
ance man of Fairbanks( is a passen
ger on the Northwestern enroute to
Seattle.
Joe Hcacock, formerly a membor of
the Fairbanks city council. Is a pas
senger on. the Northwestern, enroute
to Seattle.
Louis Anderson, of the firm of An
derson Brothers and Nerland, passed
through Juneau on the Northwestern,
S. R. Weiss, well known mining man
of Fairbanks, is a Southbound passen
ger aboard the Northwestern.
H. J. Haasch has resigned his posl
tion with the C. W. Young company
and may go to the Westward soon.
H. G. Weir, cashier In the office ol
i the Pacific Coast company In Juneau
? left on the Northwestern Sunday foi
I a four weeks' vacation in the States.
James Lawler and wife of Funtei
left for their- home on the Georgia.
WISCONSIN MAN
CLAIMS. DISCOVERY
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2.?Prof. Law-,
rence Martin, of the University of Wls
co" 'In. an authority on glaciers in a
letter uu... "'1 to the National Geo
graphic Bocletyt claims to be the dis
coverer of a new Alaska railway route
connecting Portage or Passage bay and
Prince William sound and Turnagain
arm.
The discovery of a new pass be
tween Prince William sound at Port
age bay and Turnagain arm, connect
ing with the Alaska Northern railroad
at that place, was announced last
year, and there was quite a rush to
secure locations at Portage bay. Many
of those who have made the trip over
the pass claim that It offers a shorter
lino and better grade to the coast for
the Alaska Northern road than that
now used by it to Seward. It Is be
ing urged as the proper course for the
proposed government railroad from the
Alaska coast to the interior.
EVERYBODY PREDICTS f
GOOD TIMES
I NEW YOItK, Feb. 2.?The New York ;
| Herald, reviewing the business situa-,
tlon at the end of the first month ofj
1914, says business conditions have
immeasurably improved already, and
it expressed the opinion that the im
provement will continue Indefinitely.
It presents Interviews from many
i sources to justify Its position.
President Wilson Gratified.
A Washington special says Presi
dent Wilson considors the general con
dition of the country most gratifying, i
[He belioveB that in nearly every sec
tion there Is prosperity, due largely to
the new tariff law.
Looks Bright to Steel Men.
A Pittsburgh dispatch says Presi- :
don Farroll of the United States Steel ;
says: "I regard business prospects as
bright They are good In Pittsburgh.
The Steel Corporation has spent $16,
000,000 in the Pittsburgh district In;
he last two years, and more operations i
are under contemplation."
Forgan' Is Hopeful.
A Chicago dispatch quotes James B. I
Forgan, president of the National City'
Bank, aB follows: "Business is grad
ually adjusting itself to the new con
ditions established by the recently en
acted tariff bill. Should the new cur- l
rency system prove all that the govern
ment believes It to be, confidence will
be restored immediately and prosper-1
ity will be re-established."
Simmons Sees Improvement.
President Simmons of the Simmons
Hardware Co., St. Louis, says: "It Is
my . 'finont that following January
there win .. ? decided improvement
of feeling, which will be visible to
everybody not later than July, but
showing a slight gain in each month,
beginning with January."
London Situation Rosy.
LONDON, Feb. 2.?A boom is cur
rent in investment ? securties in the
London market. All high-class Btocks
and bonds are buoyant.
PROMINENT SEATTLE
MERCHANT IS DEAD
SEATTLE. Feb. 2.?A. G. Buchanan,
for many years a prominent merchant
In this city, formerly member of the
Garvey-Buchanan company, died here j
yesterday.
STOCK EXCHANGE TO
FIGHT OWN BILL |
NEW YORK, Feb.' 2.?A committee!
headed by President Mabon of the I
New York Stock Exchange will go |
to Washington Wednesday of this week !
to oppose the Owen stock exchange
regulation bill.
BANKS WANT TO JOIN
NEW RESERVE SYSTEM
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2.?More than
half of the national banks in United
States now have made legal applica
tion for membership In the new Fed
eral reserve system.
FARMERS MAY GET
CHEAPER LOANS
WASHINGTON, Feb. 2. ? Senator
? George W. Norris, of Nebraska, has in
1 troduced a bill which would permit
government loans on farm mortgages
t at 4 per cent, government to raise
, the necessary funds at 3% per cent.
L. K. Kennedy, goneral manager of
- the Jualln mines, left for Jualin on the
last trip of the Georgia.
DIAZ' MANAGER
TO QUIT MEXICO
MEXICO CITY, Fob. 2.?Jose Luis
Requina, chief of the Felix Diaz or
ganization, was arrested today and
released upon his giving a promise
that he will leave the country.
Germany Backing U. S.
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 2.?A complete
agreement on the vital phases of the
Mexican question exists between Von
Plntze, the German Minister to Mexi
co, and Llnd, with the approbation of
the German government. Recent con
ference between them resulted in the
strongest assurances by the Berlin rep- ,
resentative that Germany will co-op- j
erate in all things with the United |
States. v I
Morgan Ask* Government Aid.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.?J. P. Mor
gan & Company have represented to
the United States government that
they represent people holding $50,000,
900 of Mexican government securities
upon which the interest has defaulted,
und they have asked the government
to help them collect it. It is under
stood that the State Department will
Jo nothing until Huerta Is eliminated
from thp situation.
SENATOR CULLOM'S I
BODY AT REST
M I
CPRINGFIELD, 111., Feb. 2?The
body of former Senator Shelby M. Cul
lorn was lowered to its last resting
place at sun down yesterday in Oak
Ridge cemetery. He was burled be- j
tween the graves of his two wives,11
who were sisters?Hannah and Julia j
Fisher, before their marrtagc.
CAPTAIN AND CREW OF
GERMAN BARK ARE LOST
FALMOUTH, Eng., Feb. 2.? Capt.!
Lorenz and eighteen of his crew per- j
ished yesterday when the German
bark, Herr A. Frim, bound from Chile,
struck a reef just at the end of her
voyage.
CANDLE MAN DIES
BEFORE WEDDINGi'
?+?
DULUTH, Minn., Feb. 2?Mrs. D.
H. Haslem received a cablegram to-1
day announcing the death of her broth- j
er, William H. Myers, at Candle, Al
aska. The Alaska man was engaged
to marry a Kentucky girl, who is now I
in Seattle, next spring.
REDELSHEIMER STRICKEN
WITH PARALYSIS
SEATTLE, Feb. 2.?Julius Redel
sheimer, a pioneer clothing merchant
of this city, was stricken with paraly-,
sis yesterday. His condition is criti- j
cal.
KERMIT ROOSEVELT
MAY BECOME DEMOCRAT
NEW YORK, Jan. 31.?It is said that
Kermit Roosevelt is to become a Dem-:
ocrat as well as to marry the daughter i
of a prominent member of that party.1
It is said that he is an admirer of;
President Woodrow Wilson and the.
policies of his administration.
SUPPOSED PAUPER IS
HEIRESS TO $500,000
?+?
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 2.?Miss Nan
ette Warren, who kept vigil over the
corpse of her sister Mary for three
weeks was committed to an insane
[ }
asylum Saturday. It was supposed
that the girls were suffering from pov
erty, but it has. developed that they
are the daughters and sole heirs of a
half-million-dollar estato left by Sam
uel Warren, a Toledo, Ohio, manufac-j
turer, who mysteriously disappeared in
1878.
CLARK PROUD OF
DEMOCRATIC RECORD
MUSCATINE, la., Feb. 2. ? In a
speech delivered here Saturday night
In behalf of the Congressional candi
dacy of Henry Volmer, the Democrat
ic nominee to succeed the late I. S.
Pepper, said that he is proud of tho
first year's record of the Democratic
administration. He Baid that it had
been the best year's work done at
Washington in a generation.
Anti-Trust Prosecutions
Come to Sudden End
Fines Imposed on defendant
companies by Judge R. W. Jen
nings are as follows:
* First Action.
Pacific Coast 8teamshlp Co. $5,000
North Pacific Wharves and
Trading Co 5,000
Alaska 8teamship Company. 5,000
Pacific and Arctic Railway
and Navigation Co 1,000
Canadian Pacific Railroad
Co 500
Second Action.
Pacific Coast Steamship Co..$1,250
Pacific Coast Company 1,250
North Pacific Wharves and
Trading Company 5,000
Pacific and Arctic Railway
and Navigation Co 1;000
The defendant corporations In the
transportation prosecutions this morn
ing In the district court, by their at
torneys entered pleas of guilty to the
indictments and, on motion of District
Attorney John Rustgard, the indict
ments, against each of the individuals
is servants of such corporations, who
had been arrested, were dismissed by
Judge R. W. Jennings. This togeth
sr with the sentence imposed by the
lourt terminates the action.
There were two indictments, one
iccused the defendant corporations,
the North Puciiic Wharves and Trad
ing company. Pacific and Arctic Rail
way and Navigation company, the Pa
jiflc Coast company, and the Pacific
Soast Steamship company, of entering
Into an unlawful conspiracy for the
control of the wharfage facilities In
Skagway. The other charges the Pa
cific and Arctic Railway and Naviga
tion company, the Pacific Coast Steam
ship company, Alaska Steamship com
pany, Canadian Pacific Railroad com
pany, the North Pacific Wharves and
Trading company, of unlawful dis
crimination and conspiracy in combin
ing to control Alaska traffic for them
selves to the exclusion of any other
person or company by making lower
through rates on the steamships and
a lower wharfage rate at Skagway for
those in the alleged conspiracy than
could be obtained by persons, and
companies not in the combination.
C. E. Wynn-Johnson, E. E. Billin
hurst, W. H. Nansen, Ira Bronson, J.
C. Ford. J. W. Smith, C. E Houston, A.
L. Berdoe and F. J. Cushing, as offi
cers of the corporations, were individ
ual defendants in the first mentioned
indictment, and A. L. Berdoe, C. E.
Wynn-Johnson, E. E. Billlnghurst, W.
H. Nansen, Ira Bronson, J. C. Ford,
Charles E. Peabodyf W. B. King, G.
H. Highbee, J. H. Bunch, E. C. Ward,
J. H. Young, and F. B. Wurzbacher,
r.s corporation officers, were individ
ual defendants In the other indict
ment.
Both Indictments were for violation
of the Sherman anti-trust act. The in
dictments against the individual de
fendants have been dismissed except
as to A. L. Berdoe, E. E. Billinghurst,
W. H. Nansen, and W. B. King, who
have not been arrested.
This morning W. H. Bogle and W. B.
Stratton, representing defendant cor
porations, asked leave to enter pleas
of guilty, giving as a reason the enor
mous expense of going through trial,
as indicated through past experiences
in the cause! under question.
District Attorney John Rustgard,
who asked I'or the dismissal of the
cases against the individual defend
ants, gives as his reason: "That the
case tried last year, being as clear
as any of them and tried before an ex
ceptional intelligent jury, resulted in
no conviction, although ten of the jury
were in favor of convicting the cor
poration, while but five were willing
to convict Individuals through whom
the corporations acted. The depart
ment of justice took the position that'
if a corporation was guilty that the
individuals were also guilty, for the
j reason that corporations can work
only through individuals,
j "It has become perfectly apparent,"
I said Mr. Rustgard, "that there Is no
hope of conviction at this term. The
most I could expect would be a dis
agreement as to inviduals and possi
ble disagreement as to corporations.
I placed the matter before the Depart
ment of Justice and yesterday noon
received permission from the Depart
ment to dispose of the cases in this
manner.
"Another motive actuating me in
the matter is to clearup all the Im
portant matters in hand before the ap
pointment of my successor in office."
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