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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 04, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 374. ? JUNEAU, ALASKA. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Boise to vote on Alaska railroad bill feb. 11
, 7 T ? ,
Bill Would Make Nation
Pay Prosecution Costs
The bill introduced iu the House ofl
Representatives by Delegate James
Wlckersham to cure the defect in the
Alaska revenue laws also provides tor
the payment of costs of prosecutions
under the laws of the Territory of Al
aska by the Federal government justj
as they are paid for prosecutions in
the Territory under the acts of Con
gress. j
The bill, which was referred to the
committee on Territories, excluding
the title and enacting clause is as fol
lows:
"That those two acts of the Legisla
ture of the Territory of Alaska enti
tled "Chapter flfty-two (H. B. No. 96),
an act to establish a system of taxa
tion. create revenue, and providing
for the collection thereof for the Ter
ritory of Alaska, and for other pur
poses," approved by the Governor of
the Territory or Aiasa* .??? Ill Ob, UIUV -
teen hundred and thirl ?..?en. and "Chap
ter numbered flfty-four (H. B. No. 98),'
an act to impose a poll tax upon male
persons in the Territory of Alaska and
provide means for its collection." ap
proved by the Governor of Alaska May
flret. nineteen hundred and thirteen,
be. and each Is hereby, ratified and
made valid from the date of its re-j
spective approval by the Governor of i
the Territory of Alaska, and all their
provisions shall be held to be in full j
force and effect from an after the date
of the approval of this act by the
President
"Sec. 2.?That nothing in that act
of Congress entitled "An Act creating
a legislative assembly in the Terri
tory of Alaska and conferring legisla
tive power thereon, and for other pur
poses." approved August twenty-fourth,
nineteen hundred and twelve, shall be
so construed as to prevent the courts j
now existing or that may be hereafter [
created in said Territory from enforc
ing within their respective Jurisdic
tions all laws passed by the legisla
ture within the power conferred up-j
on it. the same as if such laws were j
passed by Congress, nor to prevent the {
legislature passing laws imposing ad
ditional duties, not inconsistent with
the present duties of their respective
offices, upon the Governor, marshals,
deputy marshals, clerks of the district
courts, and United States commission
ers acting as justices of the peace,
judges of probate courts, recorders,
and coroners, and providing the neces
sary expenses of performing such du
ties. and in the prosecuting of all
crimes denounced by Territorial lavs
the costs shall be paid the same as
is now or may hereafter be provided
by act of Congress providing for the
prosecution of criminal ofTenses in said
Territory, except that in prosecutions
growing out of any revenue law passed
by the legislature the costs shall be
paid as in civil actions and such prose
cutions shall be in the name of the
Territory."
GEORGIA BRINGS MANY.
The Georgia arrived from Sitka and
wayports this morning and brought
the following pasesngers for Juneau:
From Sitka?H. Sokoloff. J. Hills,
G. Dusing.
From Tenakee?R. N. Nikovich. J.
H. Sully. Jack Carlson. T. F. Glllis. W.
N. Reed. Mytrle Miller, Rose Smith.
From Gypsum?W. Hawkles.
From Hoonah ? Mrs. Hammond,
Eliza Lawrence. Martha Lawrence, J.
Brown. Mrs. Sharclaire, A. Donnely.
l^on Ward. M. T. Fredenberg.
From Funter ? W. H. Lancaster,
Dave Bauner, John Nelson, T. Bond.
COMPLETE CHANGE OF PROGRAM
GRAND THEATRE TONIGHT.
The show tonight is comprised ol
the finest selected reels:
"Recognition." an intensely absorb
ing drama of domestic affairs. An
. American Western play, always good.
"The Wood Nymph," a story of a
fisherman. The kind that you all like,
by the Reliance.
"Boss of the ' Ranch." interesting
Ammex Western play. Nora shows
her "foreman" who is boss.
"In a Garden," Thanhouser plaj
that you all will enjoy. When I Firsl
Entered the Garden, Miss Marie was
seven; when Master Jack returned
from college Miss Marie was "sweel
sixteen."
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?21.
Minimum?11.
Partly cloudy.
COUNCIL TO PASS
NEW ELECTION LAW
City Attorney J. B. Marshall has pre
pared a new election ordinance tor the
City of Juneau which will be intro
duced at the meeting of the city coun
cil next Friday night The Territorial
legislature having conferred the right
to vote on the women of Alaska, one
of the salient features of the new elec
tion ordinance makes provisions for
their right to the franchise in all city
elections. One year's residence in the
Territory and six months in the city
next prior to any election is necessary.
The registration books must be open
ed by the city clerk at least 30 days
prior to any general election and at
least fifteen days prior to any special
election and the city clerk must name
a registration officer.
The city clerk must publish in a
paper of general circulation printed
within the city for at least twenty days
before any general election notice of
such election.
Provision is made for a modified Au
stralian ballot system for all elections
and is is made obligatory that all
workers handling literature, advisory
: ballots or otherwise electioneering,
| must remain at least 100 feet from the
I main entrance of any polling place.
At the second meeting in March the
| city council must appoint three elec
! Mon judges and two clerks for the gen
jeral election following on the second
, Tuesday in April.
Clerk's Report
It ia expected that the-report of City
[ Clerk EX W. Pettlt will be "completed
| and be submitted at this meeting. This
I report will cover in detail every ex
| penditure of the present city adminis
tration, including that on obligations
i of previous administrations. It will
also show in detail what has been ac
complished by the present administra
tion in the conduct of city affairs and
j in the prosecution of municipal work
land developments; the establishing of
municipal buildings, street and sewer
I improvements, fire protection, and im
provement of public schools.
ATHLETIC CLU*. REGULAR
DANCE THURSDAY EVE.
The Juneau Athletic Club will give
another of their delightful dances In
Elks' hall Thursday night of thlr.
week. These weekly affairs have cone
to be looked forward to by many of
the younger set especialy. But old
, and young are assured a good time.
The same excellent manage
ment that has made all previous
dances of the organization such pro
nounced successes will have entire
charge of the coming even.
Splendid music is assured, the
famous Juneau orchestra under the
leadership of Prof. Sumpf having
been secured for the occasion.
ALASKAN HOTEL ARRIVALS.
?+?
The following arrivals are registered
at the Alaskan hotel: H. E. Shook, A.
M. Goodman, D. I. Molr, W. H. Bo
gle, W. B. Stratton. Bruce C. Shorts,
'Seattle: O. Huff, Sheep creek; H. W.
; Marsh, Whitehorse; V, Sicott, Cor
jdova; J. R. Hayden, Seward: C. R.
Brook. Alaska: E. Miller, P. Paulson,
city.
TO REPAIR CANNERY
FOR SEASON'S WORK
Capt. A. Nilsen, superintendent ol
the Dundaa Bay cannery, chartered the
Fox and with a small cannery crew
left at 3 o'clock this morning for the
, purpose of getting the plant in condl
tion for the coming season's work,
Capt. Nilsen expects to return to Ju
neau within about ten days.
E. LANG COBB WANTS *
HOMESTEAD NEAR TOWN
E. Lang Cobb has filed a soldier's ad
ditional homestead application ?ritl
the local land office for a tract of 1.'
acres of land adjoining Evergreei
j cemetery and also adjoining the trac
known as the Sheldon homestead. Th<
I land in question Is very near to th<
land that has already been platted lnt<
lots to be annexed to the Town of Ju
neau.
NEW NOTARY.
John R. Beegle of Ketchikan hai
been appointed a notary public by Gov
J. Ft A. Strong.
CUSTOMS OFFICIALS
HONOR FORMER CHIEF
The men In the customs service of
Alaska, from every section of tho Ter
ritory, united In presenting Former
Collector J. R .Willis and Mrs. Willis
with a beautiful sterling silver tea
service, as a testimonial of the high
esteem and friendliness in which he
Is held by hia former co-workers in
the customs seYvlco, most of whom
had been associated with him for from
four to fourteen years.
The presentation was made last
night at the Willis home by a commit
tee consisting of the Juneau ofllco
force, Collector J. F. Pugh, Special
: Deputy C. D. Garfield, Deputies Geo.
ISlmpklns, and D. A. Meek: Deputy!
Collector Edwin J. Stivers of St. Ml-j
chael's and Deputy Collector Nicholas
Bolshanln of Unalaska. The presen
tation speech was mado by Mr. Gar
field, who dwelt at some length on
the friendly relations that had always
existed between the men of the ser
vice and their chief. Mr. Stivers also
mado an address, conveying the same
thought. Mr. Willis feelingly replied
j for himself and Mrs. Willis.
The members' of the committee
1 were entertained at dinner by the hnp
I py hosts, rounding out a very enjoy
! able evening.
I ?
GOVERNMENT HELPS
ALASKA BOOSTERS
! Supplementing the work of the <'
( aska Bureau of the Now Senttlo Cha
! ber of Commerce in advertising Ala
j ka, the Department of Agriculture hi
! issued a bulletin for distribution by tL.
? representatives of the bureau among
j visitors to their exhibit at Washing
ton.
i The bulletin says that Alaska has
j more than 64,000,000 acres of land on
which there are possibilities for farm
ing and grazing. The department has
; four experimental stations, one on the
Yukon, within soventy-Ave miles of the
J Arctic Circle; another in the interior.
, one in Southern Alaska and one in the
'southwestern part.
j Currants, raspberries, gooseberries,
J blueberries and cranberries are plenti
: ful in the Northland. Varieties of
wheat, oats, barley, rye, potatoes and
i many other vegetables have- matured
j every season since the department has
started its work at its two most north
ern stations.
The new bullentin on Alaska, while
! reciting so many optimistic facts, also
points out to the homesteader the dlf
' Acuities which will bo encountered.
The Federal homestead laws extend to
' Alaska, but In the Northern Territory
the entryman may Ale upon 320 acres
instead of 160. One may locate upon
unsurveyed land, and establish lines
by metes and bounds, but title cannot
be obtained until the survey is made
and approved. Little of the availablo
land has been surveyed, although that
| work is now In progress.
Here are a few of the Interesting
facts brought out in the bulletin: Se
1 attle is nearer Maine than it is to the
western point of Alaska; the mean an
nual temperature of; Sitka is about the
same as that of Washington, D. C.;
Alaska has numerous deep land-locked,
ice-free harbors; the coast line is 26.
000 miles long and there are 6,000 miles
of navigable rivers.
?^ ^
M. S. WHITTIER WILL
COME TO JUNEAU
M. S. Whlttier. of the customs ser
vice formerly stationed at Cordova,
Skagway and Ketchikam-: has been
transferred to Juneau and is expected
to arrive from Ketchikan. Mr. Whit
tier will take the post vacated by Col
lector of Customs J: "K Pngh through
the appointment of the latter.
Mr. Whlttier is well known all over
1 Alaska and is very popular. Ho is an
active spirit in the leading fraternal
1 organizations, a high Mason and also
an Elk. Mrs. Whlttier and their son
' will accompany him to Juneau.
Mr. Whlttier was stationed at Ju
neau at one time.
, RECOVERS STICKPIN.
Dr. L. O. Sloane, who lost n very
i valuable stickpin, with, opal settings
| advertised his loss in The Empire yes
i terday. A few hours later he had the
t article returned to him.
3 * ? ?
3 BIG MASQUERADE FEB. 19
> ?+?
Remember the big masquerade
dance that will be given by the Ju
neau Athletic club Thursday evening
Feb. 19th, at Elks' hall. It will be the
s time of the year.
The Juneau Athletic club give!
dances every Thursday evening. 2-4-t:
Constitutionalists See
End of the War
JUAREZ, Mexico, Feb. 4.?The news
from Washington that President Wood
row Wilson had decided to raise the
ombargo against the importation of
arms from the United States into Mex
ico caused the wildest kind of Joy
among the leaders of the Constitu
tionalists and their supports here.
There has been a general celebration.
Proclaims Americans Mexican
Friends.
JUAREZ, Mex., Feb. 4.?Gen Villa
said last night: "Once more^wo have
proof that the United States 1b the
greatest friend the people of Mexico
have among the Nations of the world.
I predict that when the revolution shall
have ended, which will be soon now,
Mexico and the United States will be
more closely allied than they ever wop
before." H
' W
Americans Quit Mexico City.
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 4?Many Amer
icans upon tearing of the plan of Pres
ident Woodrow Wilson last night to
raise the embargo oh the importation
of arms from that country left for the
coast. The night trains for Vera Cruz
were loaded with people leaving the
capital, though it is known that Hu
erta plans to fight until the very end.
Pi^sident Signs Mexican Order.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4?President
Woodrow Wilson signed the order re
moving all restrictions upon the expor
tation of arms to Mexico last night.
English Gold for Mexico Bank.
MOBILE, Ala., Feb. 4?The Bank of
England has shipped 13,500,000 in gold
to the Bank of London and Mexico In
Mexico City. The money went through
Mobile in six large trunks.
'*! '
Rebels^ake Mining Camp.
f * CfllkUAHU>C Beb. 4.?Mattehuala,
an Important copper mining camp in
Mexico, has been captured by rebels.
A plant of the American Smelting Co.
is situated in the town, which has a
population of 16,000. It was captured
| by strategy.
T ? ^
HOW TO TURN IN
A FIRE ALARM
Chief of Police J. T. Martin
announces that In turning In a
fire alarm the discoverer of a
fire should call^ 318. four rings.
' That will got the night jailer at
! the city hail. He will cause the
| alarm to It- given to the proper
officers of the fire department, j
?'
WHEELER LIQUOR CASE
EXHAUSTS REGULAR PANEL
* \ . ? ?
Prank Wheeler wont to trial in the
district court this morning on the in
dictment charging him with selling
liquor to Indians. The matter of se
j curing a jury has consumed nearly all
of the day. The defense, conducted
I by Attorney A. B. Callaham. exercised
| seven peremtory challenges, and the
I court excused three for cause before a
single juror was secured. The regu
! lar panel was exhausted and a special
' venire ordered for fourteen. Fred An
i demon, of the regular panel, was the
! first juror accepted.
? ? ?
JUNEAUITE IS ENJOYING
VISIT TO LONDON TOWN
Harry Smith who left Juneau some
weeks ago to visit his mother at the
old home in London, England, writes
Bert Huehn of Juneau that he is hav
ing a fine time in the big village, but
that he expects to sail for Juneau some
tlmo during the present month.
ASKING FOR REVOCATION
OF CARLSON LICENSE
?+?
The United States attorney has filed
a petition in the district court for
the revocation of the liquor license of
Albert Carlson on the ground that he
has violated his pledge not to permit
any female in or about the rooms
whe^e liquor was to be sold under said
license. It is alleged that at sundry
times since the granting of the license
that defendant has unlawfully per
mitted females in and about the rooms
or saloon where liquors are sold and
ser ed under the license granted. The
license ao granted runs from July 1
last to June 30 next. The hearing on
the petition hao been set for Saturday
J February 7. Tbo petition is signed
' by John Hustrard dis'.rlct attorney for
^ this division
CASE: COMING HOME.
.1 ?
Advices received state that Council
man W. H. Case and Mrs. Case, who
have been sojourning in the States,
will return to Juneau on the next sail
ing of the Spokane from Seattle.
? ? ?
TWO-STEP-CONTEST TONIGHT.
'! ?
1 Tonight 1b the night of the big
two-Btcp contest at Jaxon's rink. A
handsome prize for the best single
two-stepper, open to all. Ten cents
to balcony.
> * ? ?
Jose Ramirez Guilty.
?*?
) The jury trying Jose Ramirez for
the crime of robbery in the district
} court yesterday brought in a verdict
f of guilty. .
WANT TO KNOW
WHAT PEOPLE THINK
Tentative plans arc under way for
submitting soveral bonding proposi
tions to the people of Juneau for th&
purpose of getting an expression Of
the sentiment of the people on this
subject. The extremely rapid growth
of Juneau during the past year and
the promise of even greater strides
during the next twelve months, it is
urged makes it Imperative that some
other method beyond the annual tax
rate be ndopted to raise the necessary
fundB to provide the public improve
ments that the growth of the city now
demands and will continue to demand
until made.
It Is designed that the propositions
for bonding shall be segregated and
in each instance the specific purpose
for which the money Is to. be used
shall be named. If the people express
a strong sentiment in favor of any of
the propositions the vote cast for such
will be forwarded to Congress with a
petition for special legislation permit
ting the City of Juneau to bond for
such purpose.
PECULIAR ANTt- ARGUMENT.
Senator John Sharp Williams
brought forward as an argument
against government construction of
a railroad the fact that the govern'
ment cable to Alaska cost $1,080,000
and in six years' time returned to the
government its original cost and $50.
000 profit.?Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
r i
i i PERSONAL MENTION |
!? J
Onk Olson returned on the Mariposa
from the South. Mrs. Olson, who has
been visiting in the States, accompan
| led .her husband home. *
W. N. Reed and J. H. Sully of Tcna
kee are visiting in Juneau and arc
guests of the Occidental Hotel.
F\ M. Bailey, bank examiner, attach
ed to the department of justice as in
vcstlgator, who came to Juneau In con
nection with the Summers prosecution
expects to leave for the South on th<
Princess Maquinna.
SEWARD SOCIETY TO
RENDER PROGRAIV
4>
The following is the program foi
the Seward Society meeting Friday
Feb 6, at the high school:
Roll Call?Quotations from Lincoln.
Waino Hendrlckson?Current Events
Paul Thompson ? Lincoln's Gettys
. burg Address.
Klonda Olds?Life of Lincoln.
Harry Sabin?Recitation.
Elizabeth Hopper?Adjective Letter.
Dawn Davis?Origin of Valentine'
Day.
Harlan Herner?Two-Minute Tallk.
Margaret Dudley?Humorous Reading
Cyril Kashaveroff?Original Basketbal
Story.
Lawrence Hulbert?Conundrums.
Mr. Perkins?Critic.
WOMEN PAY FINE FOR
TREATMENT OF ANOTHEF
VOLO, 111., Feb. 4. ? Five womei
were fined $100 each yesterday evt
ning for riding another woman out o
town on a rail.
FIND KARLUK LIFE
PRESERVER ON SHORE
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4?W. T. Lopp,
of the bureau of education, supcrln- j
tendent of education in Alaska, has j
I reported that a life preserver bearing
| the name "Karluk" had washed ashore i
I at Klvalina, Alaska. The discovery ls;
| thought to indtcato that' the Karluk
might have been wrecked.
WASHINGTON LUMBERMAN
DIES AT HOQUIAM, WASH.
HOQUIAM, Wash., Feb. 4.?Joseph
{ Lyttle, a millionaire lumberman, died
| here yesterday.
STRATHCONA LEAVES
$500,000 TO YALE
? NEW YORK, Feb. 4?It was learned!
' today that Lord Strathcona left an |
! estate of $500,000 with the request!
that It be used speclaly to enable em-1
' ployees and the sons of employees to j
enter Yale University.
WANTS STATUE IN
HALL OF FAME
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4. ? Bringing
a statute of himself which he will ask
Congress to place in the Hall of
. Fame, John J. McDevitt, of Wilkes
Farre, who was a "millionaire for a
day," arrived on a special train yester
day with an escort of admiring friends. I
?^
iNO COMMITTEE ON
WOMAN SUFFRAGE
?+?
WASHINGTON Feb. 4?The House
Democratic caucus held last night [
i went on record against the proposition
jto create a committee on woman suf-i
fragc. The matter was considered at
j length, and had many supporters. It
was decided, however, that Congress
will have its hands full to act on all
the questions that were promised in
the last National platform.
GEN. CARR'S DEATH
DUE TO ACCIDENT
,
( SEATTLE, Jan. 30.?The post mor
? tern examination on the remains of
;Gen. E. M. Carr, formerly of Alaska,
who died at his home in Selah, Wash.,
last Tuesday, settled definitely that
death was due to an accident and not
to natural causes, as was at first re
: ported.
' i When the body was brought to Seat
I tie it was found that the third vertc
1! bra, which is about the middle of the
' I neck, was crushed to the point of sev
: crance.
j Investigation indicated that Gen.
Carr had slipped In the snow on the
j Becond step of the outside stairway at
11 his home and fallen over the low hand
? rail, striking on Ills head, ten feet
; j below.
;? ??
FIVE THOUSAND BANKS
WANT IN RESERVE SYSTEM
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.?More than
5,000 banks have made application to
j;oln the new regional reserve system.
? ? ?
i CANADA'S CROP IS
NOT SO GREAT
OTTAWA, Feb. 4. ? The Canadian
/*erral crop In 1913 is valued at f552,
I 1771,000, against J557.344.000 in 1912.
r WILSON SAID. TO
FAVOR HIGHER RATES
NEW YORK, Feb. 4.?A Washing
i. ton special to the New York Times
i- says that President Woodrow Wilson
has clearly indicated to those who have
talked with him that he favors an in
crease in railroad rates. The Presi
dent admits that business Is poor in
g spots, and adds that railroads seem to
be the worst spot. The President has
been receiving many letters from per
sonal friends urging the necessity for
1 giving the railroads higher rates.
CALIFORNIA'S OIL
PRODUCTION GROWS
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 4.?The pro
{ duction of oil in Calofomia for 1913
amounted to 98,000,000 barrels as com
ii pared with 86,450,767 in 1912. The
(- valuation for the 1913 output Is J50,
f 000,000 compared with J39,213,588 in
11912.
Houston Expects Debate
To End Tomorrow
To Consider Bill Tomorrow.
Washington, Feb. 4.?In an
nouncing the postponement of the
consideration of the Alaska rail
road bill today by the House of
Representatives until tomorrow
Chairman W. C. Houston, of the
House committee on Territories,
said the final vote on the bill will
probably be taken Wednesday,
February 11. He said he believed
that all the time allowed for de
bate would be consumed before
that time.
WASHIN'GTON, Feb. 4. ? It was
agreed that all day Thursday would
be devoted to the debate of the Alas
ka railroad bill. It is hoped that all
the time allowed for debate will be
consumed at an early date, and a vote
secured.
Alaska Passed for Immigration Bill.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4?The post
ponement of the consideration of the
Alaska railroad bill today until tomor
row was due to a desire not to delay
the passage of the Immigration bill.
SOME MORE GOOD
TIMES PREDICTIONS
NEW YORK, Feb. 4. ? The New
York Herald continues publishing
"Good Times Predictions," and again
says that there can bo no mistaking
the upward tendency of business. It
says the movement-has become too
well under way and is based on too
solid a foundation to be stopped. It
quotes:
Gov. Foss Optimistic.
Former Gov. Eugene N. Foss of
Massachusetts, as saying: "I am an
optimist in my view of the outlook for
business during the present year. We
arc going forward, although people
have undoubtedly been holding back
for the situation to clear up. The
President's message was inspiring in
many ways, and I agree with him, as
everybody who studies the situation
must agree, that the railroads arc in
superably tied up to good business. If
they are reasonably prosperous it will
go a great ways towards bring about a
general revival in industry."
Armour Supports President.
Vice-President Dunham, of Armour
& Co. says: "I think I am giving
I Mr. Armour's opinion when I say
; President Wilson's latest message
meets with his hearty approbation.
That feeling is due not so much to
what the message itself contains as to
| Mr. Armour's opinion of the man in
connection with what he has accom
plished in the short time he has been
President. Mr. Armour feels that a
man who has been President only ten
! months and who has been able to put
! through two such important pieces of
legislation, is certainly deserving of
1 the support of all those who believe
! the country is passing through a stage
: where new conditions must be met and
dealt with."
Market for Exchange Seats.
j Several more New York Stock Ex
(change seats have been transferred
for $50,000, a price which compares
with $37,000 last year.
French Conditions Improve.
PARIS, Feb. .4.?A Paris cable to
i the New York American says the sud
i den appearance of public buying after
j many months of abstention has made
! a great impression In speculative clr
j cles. Shorts have begun covering, and
' the outlook Is brighter than for a year
and a half. Were It not for general dls
: trust of the flnnncial policy of the
j French government, a pronounced up
i ward swing would be expected In
j French markets.
- - -
MAY MAKE TWO
COMMERCE COMMISSIONS
NEW YORK, Feb. 4.?A proposal to
split the Interstate Commerce Com
mission into two parts to enable It
to dispose of business more expedi
tiously has been placed before Presi
dent Wilson by Representative Jef
ferson M. Levy, of Now York.
NATIONAL CANNERS
MEET AT BALTIMORE
1 BALTIMORE, Md., Feb. 4.?The an
ual convention of the National Can
ners Association and allied Industries
opened hero yesterday.
i
t Empire ads for results.

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