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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 07, 1914, Image 1

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THKALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
? = ) I ' ?? ' " -
VOL. III., NO. 377. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, FEB. 7, 1914. * PRICE, TEN CENTS
MEXICO CITY RESIDENTS TURNING AGAINST HUERTA
-
Council Stands Against
Unlicensed Liquor Selling
The city council took an emphatic
stand at last night's session on the;
suppression of the liquor tratlic in the :
restricted district. That body went ]
on record as opposed to the evil and
placed the burden of enforcing the j
law against selling liquor without a
license on the department of justice.
The last act before adjournment was
to pass a resolution directing
that a letter be addressed to
the district attorney informing the gov
ernment that the city council of Juneau
would lend every aid to the Federal
government in enforcing the law
against selling liquor without a li
cense.
The subject was brought up earlier
in the evening by Councilman H. J.
Raymond, who. as foreman of the late
grand jury, had been requested by the
Jury to report to the city council of
Juneau on matters brought to light,
through its investigations. Council
man Raymond said that statements
were made before the grand jury that
convictions for selling liquor in the
restricted district could not be se
cured. even where the evidence of guilt
was conclusive, because the sentiment
of the ^immunity was not back of the
enforcement of the law in this re
spect. also that statements had been
made tending to show that the city
of Juneau was culpable in allowing,
flagrant conditions to exist in that dis
trict. The system of collecting tines
was touched upon by M r. Raymond
and he said the city was held to be j
a party to the crime or evasion of the
law by the district attorney's office.;
Ole Orson was present and asked to
address the body on the subject. Mr.
Orson said the conditions in that
neighborhood were becoming intoler-,
able: that his family and several oth-i
ers would be compelled to move If
something was not done. At tlic con- j
elusion of Mr. Orson's address a mo
tion was made that the chief of police
be Instructed to close the restricted
district, but the motion was after-.
wards withdrawn. A long discussion
followed on the matter of the city:
suppressing the liquor traffic in the !
district and it was found that there was ;
no law or ordinance whereby the city 1
could interfere, and the matter was or
dered called to the attention of the i
Federal authorities.
HIGH SCHOOL TEAMS PLAY
AT JAXON'S RINK TONIGHT
Tonight the Juneau and Douglas
high school basketball teams will play
In Jaxon's rink. The line-up of the
two teams will likely remain the same
as in the last contest. A large crowd
of Douglas rooters Is expected to ac
company the team.
WILL LEAVE WITH
PRISONERS ON MARIPOSA
? -
Chief Deputy Marshal J. F. Mullen,
assisted by J. F. McDonald, will leave
for McNeil's Island penitentiary on
the Southbound Mariposa early next
week taking prisoners qnder sentence
to that Institution. The prisoners are
W. J. Burke and Frank Wheeler, both
of whom were convicted of selling li
quor to Indians. The former is sen
tenced to 21 months and the latter to
15 months.
ALASKAN HOTEL ARRIVALS.
The following arrivals are registered
at the Alaskan Hotel: W. H. Rey
nolds. F. A. Miller. Jualin; R. A. Mc
Gregor. E. Miller. P. Paulson. City:
0. Wilcox. Perseverance: G. Van
Dyke. H. E. Shook. George B. Fredell,
D. I. Moir, Seattle: L Schienfeldt, Ten
akee: A. M. Goodman. Douglas; G.
Bernstein. Prince Rupert: F. Miller.
Vancouver: H. W. Marsh. Whitehorse:
V. Sicott, Cordova: C. R. Brooks, Al
aska: J. R. Hayden. Seward.
BASKETBALL TONIGHT.
All roads lead to Jaxon's rink to
night The Juneau high school vs.
the Douglas high school, one of the
fastest basketball games ever seen in
Juneau. Bring your horn and toot
for your favorite. Skating as usual.!
Balcony seats. 25 cents. Game starts
at 8 o'clock sharp.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?34.
Minimum?26.
Cloudy and snow.
NEW ELECTION LAW
IS INTRODUCED
The new election ordinance prepared
by City Attorney J. B. Marshall was
introduced and read the first time at
last night's session of the city council
and It will probably be passed at the
next regular session. The salient fea
tures of the ordinance were printed
in The Empire of February 4. The
report being compiled by City Clerk
E. W. Pettit is almost finished and
there will probably be a special meet
ing early next week for the purpose
of receiving it. All of the members
of the city council were present ex
cept Councilmen Case and Pullen who
are absent from the city. Immediate
ly after the regular session the coun
cil went into executive session.
Routine Matters.
A resolution was passed authorizing
Mayor C. W. Carter to execute a lease
with Charles Goldstein for the loca
tion occupied by the city float on the
terms agreed upon, that the yearly
compensation for use of the location
be equal to the tax levy on it and the
abutting tide land property belonging
to lessor.
Bills were read, audited and ordered
paid.
A resolution was passed providing
that warrants be issued for all out
standing claims against the city and
that said warrants draw interest from
date of issue.
DISTRICT COURT NOTES.
?+?
Rice Is Sued.
A suit was filed against George L.!
Rice in the district court yesterday by !
the Continental Distributing company'
to recover money alleged to be due j
on a promissory note and for goods
furnished. In the first instance the
alleged debt was $493.54. with inter
est but the amount of principal
and interest claimed amounts to $1,
050, S3.
Attorney Cobb Asks Hearing be
Postponed.
Attorney J. H. Cobb, has applied
for a postponement of the hearing in;
the case of O. Itow and E. Fushimi
convicted and under sentence for the'
killing of Frank Dunn at Dundas Bay
some two years ago. The case was
taken on appeal to the Supreme Court
and a hearing was set for February
24. Attorney Cobb says that it will
be impossible for him to complete the
brief and reach Washington on the
date set.
The trial of W. Naklyama, indicted
by the last Ketchikan grand Jury for
complicity in the same killing has
been set for February 16.
Mr. Cobb is also attorney for the de
fendant in this case.
Henry Cooman Guilty.
The Jury trying Henry Cooman who
was indicted for sending unmailable
matter through the malls, brought in
a verdict of guilty late yesterday aftor
noon.
New Trials Asked.
Judge R. W. Jennings this afternoon
entertained motions for new trials in.
several cases. Attorney Z. R. Cheney
asked for a new trial in the case of
Jose Ramirez, convicted of robbery.
Attorney A. B. Callaham is asking for
a new trial for Frank Lewis, convicted
of robbery. Attorney J. H. Cobb is
asking for new trials in the cases of
Theodore Torge.">sen and N. B. John
son. defendants who lost In the tres
pass actions brought by the Pacific
Coast company.
CATHOLIC MEN WILL
HOLD DOUGLAS MEETING
? +?
The executive committee formed at
the preliminary meeting to organize a
council of the Knights of Columbus in
Juneau, has decided to hold another
meeting before applying for a charter.
This meeting will be held in Douglas
at such time as may be decided upon.
The secretary will Issue a call for the
meeting and all Catholic men will be
urged to attend.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
Fresh ranch eggs by the dozen or
case.
Burbanks potatoes?the best?by the
pound, sack or ton.
ROYAL FRUIT CO.. Phone 280.
KENSINGTON MINE
' LOOKING GOOD
?+?
General Manager B. L. Thane of the
Kensington Mines company who has
but recently returned from Kensington,
ufter inspecting the property reports
that cxcollent progress is being made
on the development work now under
way. Tho boarding house that was
destroyed last December has been re
built and a crew of 40 men under sup
erintendent B. B. Neldlng is engnged
in driving the Kensington crosscut
tunnel. The crew Is divided into three
shifts and a gas engine furnishes pow
er for the compressors. From the
present showing made on the Johnson
ore zone which has just been entered
It looks as if the Kensington mine will
develop into a good producer.
The property known as the Kensing
on mine has in part been worked years
ago, that is the richest of the ore was
milled under adverse conditions. Lat
er the properties were closed down
and together with other properties
came into possession of the Kensing
ton Mines Co., which is now attempt
ing to develop a sufficient ore body to
make It possible to-operate on an ec
onomic basis.
Considerable work has been done
on the three zones which run parallel
through the property. A tunnel on the
Eureka zone has been driven 1500
feet; a similar tunnel on the Kensing-;
ton zone extends 2200 feet; and a
tunnel has been- driven on the Johnson
zone 4,500 feet. What is known as
the Kensington crosscut has cut
through both the Eureka and Kensing
ton zones and some very rich ore en
countered, but not in sufficient quan
tities to furnish the tonnage for work
ing economically. The problem is to
develop mor?~ ore.
The Kensington crosscut is now into ,
the Johnson zone and the indications
are very good. If it should develop
to be as good as either the Eureka
or Kensington there will be enough
ore in sight to warrant the erection j
of a reduction plant and further de-1
velopment of the mine.
JUNEAU ATHLETIC CLUB IS
DEFEATED BY HIGH SCHOOL
J. H. S 21
J. A. C 6
The Juneau high school basketball
team defeated the Juneau Athletic
club team in a strenuous, although
one-sided, game In Jason's rink last
night. The school lads showed the
advantage of training and practice and
set a pace that was entirely too fast
for the athletics. There was a big
crowd in attendance and the clever
work of the school boys received gen
erous recognition.
The Lie-Up
Athletes? Position School?
Manners If .-. Burford
Brennan rf. ... Kashaveroff
Mulligan c Herner
Cash Cole lg Casey
McKanna rg McKinnon
?In the second half the high school
team substituted Wilson at right for
ward. and Hurlbutt at right guard.
JUNEAU TEAM WILL
GO TO SITKA SOON
The Juneau high school basketball
team will go to Sitka on the next trip
of the Georgia for the purpose of play
ing the high school team of the ancient
town. There will be eight members in
the party, including Prof. Enoch Per
kins, of the Juneau high school, who
.is coach /or the team. '?. .
The trip was made possible through
the generous response of the business
men of Juneau who contributed the
amount necessary to defray expenses
that will be incurred by making the
trip.
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
ASK FOR FOUNTAIN
i
The students of the Juneau high
school yesterday afternoon signed a [
petition addressed to the city council, i
asking for a drinking fountain in the!
city hall building that Is being used
for high school purposes. 'The pe
tition came before the council last
night, and was referred to the fire and
water committee.
ALASKA ROAD WILL
HELP PRINCE RUPERT
? - *
The vote of the United States Sen
ate. favoring the Alaska railroad bill,
is of more than passing interest to
Prince Rupert and all of new British
Columbia. Development of any mag
nitude in Alaska cannot but have some
effect on the fortunes of this city and
district.?Prince Rupert Empire.
Empire ads for results.
BUSINESS CONTINl .S
UPWARD TE NDENCY
PITTSBURGH; Pa., Feb. 7. ? 8teel
orders exceeding- 100,000 tons have
been received by the mills of the Pitts
burgh district within the last few
days. Vice-president Bope of the Car
negie Steel Co. declares that within 90
days the mills should be operating at
full capacity.
Milwaukee Pay Rolls Grow.
MILWAUKEE, Fob. 7.?There has
been large re-employment of labor in
the last week or two in Milwaukee, two
construction companies alone adding
3500 to their payrolls.
Massachusetts Mills Increase.
BOSTON, Feb. 7.?A new addition
Is being made to the Slater Mills, in
Webster, which will cost from $100,
000 to $250,000. hnd which will give
employment to several hundred more
operatives. There are 4500 now em
ployed.
The Stevens Linen Mills or Dudley,
Mass., the largest industry of its kind
in the world, is operating at full ca
pacity.
Cotton Employe* Get M"ore Pay.
BOSTON, Feb. 7?The Grosvenor
dalc Co. of Webster, Mass., cotton man
ufacturers, have announced a volun
tary wage Increase of five per cent,
and a reduction In hours from 59 to 56
per weok affoctlfig 2500 operatives.
Fourteen hundred operatives In cot
ton mills In the town of Thompson,
Conn., have been notified of a wage in
crease of five per cent., commencing
last Monday.
Better Pay for "Hello" Glrla.
CLEVELAND, O., Fob. 7. ? The
Cleveland Telephone Co. has increased
if8 wages ton pJr cent, to 1000 tele
phone operators, effective since Feb.
1st.
Orders Are 25% Better.
CHICAGO, Feb. 7.?The wholesale
department of Marshall Field & Co.
has announced that the orders for Jan
uary show an increase of 25 per cent
over those for the same month last
year.
ROBBERS KILL AND
ROB ENGLISHMAN
SEATTLE, Feb. 7.?Charles Hodges,
an Englishman, was fatally assaulted
yesterday morning in a room at the
St. James hotel, and robbed of $3,000.
A partly written will was found at the
side of his body. The assailant has
not been apprehended.
Hodges Is Dead.
SEATTLE, Feb. 7.?Charles Hodges,
the St. James hotel robbery victim,
died today of the injuries resulting
from the assault upon him.
RICHARDSON OUTLINES
DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS
Col. W. P. Richardson, whose annu
al report as president of the Alaska
board of road commissioners, makes
the following proposed dlstriibution of
the $7,250,000 which he asks Congress
for expenditure of a wagon road sys
tem In Alaska:
Maintenance of the present
roads $1,250,000
Completion of projects al
ready undertaken and their
maintenance 1,420,000
Projects approved but not
begun 2,780,000
Projects not yet Important
but which will develop aB
other roads arc built 1,800,000
Total $7,250,000
Must Have Feeders.
Speaking of the proposed Alaska
railroad. Col. Richardson Bays it will
be useless unless wagon roads are
provided as feeders. He says:
"Our board speciflcaly disavows any
intent to set forth views In opposi
tion or discouragement to railroad con
struction In the Territory under prop
er limitations, but after several years
of careful observation and study of the
land transportation conditions and of
the natural inducements to develop
and to settlement which exist, is con
vinced that no rapid or general devel
opment will follow the construction of
trunk lines or railroad unless preced
ed or accompanied by the construction
of numerous wagon roads and trails
as feeders, and even then the devel
opment will be slow."
ARCHIE LEWIS IS RETURNING
Archie Lewis, the popular young
electrician, formerly of Juneau but
more recently employed with the
Treadwell company, Is a returning pas
senger on the Admiral Sampson after
spending two weeks visiting in Sound
cities.
COURT TO DECIDE
ON SUEFRAGE LAW
CHICAGO. Fob. 7.?The Illinois wo
man suffrage law tost case, entitled
Scoun vs. the Election Commissioners
of the City of Chicago, will be decided
by the Illinois supreme court Feb.
13th.
REPUBLICANS WILL
NOT OPPOSE PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.?Both Sen
atoEL Jacob H. Gallinger, of New
Hampshire. Republl<$n Jeader. In Jhe
Senate, and Representative Jnmes R.
Mann, of Illinois, Republican floor lead
er jn the House, have assured the Dem
ocrats that the Republicans will not
oppose the passage of the administra
tion anti-trust bills.
i GERMAN SHIPS ARE
IN BIG RATE WAR
i HAMBURG, Feb. 7.?Rate war be
tween German shipping companies has
been opened by the North German
Lloyd putting its Kaiser Wilhelm der
| Gross at the exclusive disposal of
steerage passengers. A Berlin paper
declares, however, that a settlement of
the rate war may be expected shortly.
Northern Steamers Want It All.
LONDON, Feb. 7.?The North At
lantic shipping conference has reject
ed the request of the Hamburg-Amer
ican line for a larger percentage of
the transatlantic steerage traffic. The
existing agreements expired Jan. 31.
FORMER SENATOR CRANK
HEADS NEW HAVEN R. R.
???
BOSTON, Feb. 7.?The Boston Amer
ican says former United States Sena
tor W. Murray Crane Is today Ujo
man absolutely in charge of the hinb-|
er affairs of the New Haven railroad,
and author of New Haven's "we-wlll
now-be-good" policy. He has direct
ed directors of the railroad in their
recent dealings with government oLV
clals.
Borah Denounces Railroad Men.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7. ? MenTn
volved in some of the past transaction
of the New Haven road were d&
nounced as "criminals" by Senator W.
E. Borah in a speech In the Senate
yesterday afternoon. He said "they
should be occupying penitentiary
cells."
Senate to Investigate.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.?The res
olution introduced by Senator George
W. Norris, of Nebraska, providing for
a thorough Investigation of the affairs
of the New Haven railroad passed the
Senate.
LOST GARMENT, CAUSE
OF TRIAL, NOW ON
An interesting case Is on trial in
the commissioner's court this after
noon in which the plaintiff seeks to re
cover $120, the value placed on a bear
skln overcoat, which it is alleged was
left in the care of the keeper of an
inn or lodging house. The action is
brought by Nick Radonich and the de
fendant is J. H. Randle, proprietor of
the place. Attorney A. B. Callaham
represents the plaintiff and the de
fense Is being conducted by Attorney
Simon Hellenthal. The defense de
manded a Jury trial.
NEW YORK GETS
BIG TAX PAYMENT
ALBANY, N. Y., Feb. 7.?A check
for $2,584,000 in payment of the trans
fer tax on the estate of Anthony N.
Brady, has been received by New York
I State. The tax was figured on an esti
mated valuation of approximately $70,
j 000,000.
SOUTH DAKOTA LOW
RATE LAW VALID
?*?
ST. PAUL, Minn., Feb. 7.?Federal
; Judge Willard at Sioux Falls, S. D?
has filed a decslion upholding the 2%
i cent rate for passengers in South Da
kota. He had held a two-cent rate un
constitutional in that it would be con
! flscatory. The decision ended sever
al years of litigation.
SKIING IS POPULAR
PASTIME IN JUNEAU
? A
Skiing has become a popular pas
time In Juneau. The young folks, and
some that are not so young, have mas
tered the popular Northern sport The
j hills of Juneau's residential section of
fer capital opportunity for skiing, and
the best use of the snow covered
ground is being made.
COLD WAVE HITS
CENTRAL WEST
CHICAGO. Feb. 7?The entire coun
try west of the Atlantic States Is being j
swept by u cold wave. The temper-1
'ature Is generally below zero all over,
the country. At Havre, Mont, the
! thermometer registers 42 dcgreeB be-1
low zero.
There Is considerable suffering on I
account of the cold in this city, and
other centers of population.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
MAY BECOME MAjOR
i CHICAGO, Feb. 7.?Plans that have
been developing for sometime to make
the American Association a major j
baseball league seem likely to mature..
The plan Is to sell the Toledo fran-'
chlso and move it to Chicago. That
| would give the required population.
This has lead to the suggestion that |
I one of the franchises of the Eastern,
League, probably that of Rochester, be
transferred to New York, and make J
the Eastern league a major class or-!
gunization.
It is planned then to arrange the
schedules so that there would be at
least one major league game playing J
In New York and Chicago whenever a i
Fedora .eague game was scheduled
for thou- places.
-
ONE MUX POWDER
FOR EACH SENATOR
SEWa:;0, Alaska, Jan. 26.?Enough
I powder ?? ? olow up a small village, for
i ty-four res in all, was set off on the
i bench in ic celebration which greeted '
j the newr ? nat the Senate had voted fa
.vorably om the Alaska railroad bill. The
j offering ?ms in honor of the Senators
fwho hat oted for the measure. An
! nthusiau: c mass meeting followed and
| the celewution ended with a rousing
l dance, rieeches were made by the
(mayor ana councilmen.
In porrt cal circles it is expressed
jhcre tha ilaska will go Democratic In
? the delegne election next fall if the
bill pasBr ? the House. Many Republi
cans ha- ? gone on record that they
! will supi?- rt any Democratic nominee
| in the nc :i election.
0 j g
iMURPI'Y'S FRIEND
LIKES REAL MONEY
?+?
NEW "')RK, Feb. 7.?The Investi
gators hme discovered that James E.
Caffney, lurphy's friend, to whom
much ot ir e money paid by contractors
as camps rn contributions, had a fond
ness for r ul money. In one year, 1909,
when tie acqueduct contracts wese
let he u-nosited to his personal ac
count ii <ne bank $100,000 in bills.
The deport slips show currency re
ceived ana placed to his account in
*umB ranging from $1,000 to $15,000 at
% time.
Murpb' i accounts also show that
currenc) -as deposited frequently, nl
?o. but ii? ' to the extent that was done
u the ca-'-i of Gaffney.
antitrust bills may
;:e ready march ist
WASl' ^GTON, Feb. 7. ? Senator
??Yancis . Newlands, of Nevada,
?nairma: >f the Senate committee on
iiuersta* commerce, Bays the antl
i-uBt bl that have been Introduced
iu the tvate may be ready to report
J?y Man- 1st. The Senate and House
? ucerstai commerce committees have
had a np i-oer of conferences over the
lulls, an<" hey will have more of them.
Is th- turpose of both committees
tv keep n touch with each other so
flat the tills may be advanced In both
i lanche ? f Congress at the same time.
i<outt african
strike is off
LONDON, Feb. 7.?A Johannesburg
special P-rs that the new executive
o' the Fv urntion of Trades has decid
er to ct i off the projected general
strike fe* vhlch a secret call was is
piled a tr->- days ago.
furd r.mployees get
* double pay now
UETR'MT, Mich., Feb. 7.?The cm
p' tyees < ' the Ford Motor company
I who wer- mid there first salaries un
! do' the ?flt sharing plan this week
found ths their pay was nearly dou
Jblod.
Mexicans Plot to
Overthrow Gen. Huerta
! ?
MEXICO CITY. Fob. 7.?A well
planned plot to overthrow Gen. Hu
erta was discovered last night. Some
of the conspirators have been arrest
ed.
The guard at the palace has been in
creased with additional troops, and the
entire garrison (s being held In quar
ters and kept in constant readiness
for immediate action.
The people of the city are restless,
and that there are many Influential
men ready to turn on Huerta now that
| the feeling has begun to permeate the
country that his days of power are
growing few in number.
Americans Probably Dead.
JUAREZ. Mex., Feb. 7.?It Is be
lieved that the seven American rail
road men who are missing as the re
sult of the holding up of a North
western passenger train yesterday,
were burned to death in the Cumbre
tunnel, which was set on Are.
The bandits responsible for the
crime are being pursued by Constitu
tionalist cavalry, who are instructed
to give no quarter.
Americans Investigating.
EL PASO, Tex., Feb. 7.?American
authorities are investigating the dis
appearance of the American railroad
men from the passenger train of the
Northwestern railroad.
YOUNG PEOPLE KILL
THEMSELVES FOR LOVE
?+?
GREENSBORO, Pa., Feb. 7? Sitting
upright in an automobile, the woman
with her arms around the neck of her
companion, the dead bodies of John
McFadden and Miss Anna Lutz, both
aged 20 years, were discovered yester
day where they had been shot to
; death. It is a case of murder and sul
[cide. The young people were lovers.
ARMY LIEUTENANT TO
HE COURT MARTIALED
?4??
SEATTLE, Feb. 7?Lieut. Parker,
o( the Thirteenth Infantry, Is held at
Fort Lawton, nnd will be court mar
j tialed on account of shortage in his ac
[ counts while in charge of the canteen
, at Fort William H. Seward, Alaska.
i UNKNOWN WOMAN
COMMITS MURDER
NEWARK, N. J.. Feb. 7?Masked in
a veil of mourning an unknown woman
caller this morning shot Mrs. Harriet
Manning, of this city, to death in the
parlor of her mother's home. The wo
man escaped.
Young Woman Confesses Murder.
j NEWARK, N. J., Feb. 7?Miss Ha
; el Herdman, aged 20 years, daughter
of A. J. Herdman, a Newark hotel pro
i prletor, today confessed that she had
killed Mrs. Manning because of her
iove for the latter's husband. After
I confessing, Miss Herdman killed her
self. The Mannings were separated.
VIOLATED LAWS OF
CIVILIZED WARFARE
?+?
WASHINGTON, Feb. 7.?Gen. Leon
ard Wood, chief of staff, told the Sen
ate military committee today that
| when the Union troops destroyed a
Confederate military academy In 1864
their action was not In accord with
the laws of civilized warfare,
. m
DEPOT SUPERINTENDENT
DIES AT SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Feb. 7.?J. N. McLellan,
superintendent of the Oregon-Washing
ton and Milwaukee passenger station,
widely known, died here of paralysis
last night.
WOMAN SUFFRAGIST
PREDICTS VICTORY
-+?
I ALBANY, N. Y., Feb. 7.?Mrs. Car
rie Chapman. Catt of New York told
a large audience in the Assembly
Chamber last night that the Legisla
ture of 1915 was Just as sure to pass
the bill submitting a woman suffrage
constitutional amendment to the voters
as the sun was to rise.
"Nothing in this world can prevent
our triumph," said Mrs. Catt. "It is
not that woman don't get the things
they want. They do get them, but
they will get them a great deal easier
when they have the right to vote."
Senator Foley, a young Tnmmanyite
but anti-Murphylte, is author of the
j woman's suffrage bill.

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