OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 12, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-02-12/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
? ___? ' ; . '? . ' A . V
VOL. III., NO. 381. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, FEB. 12, 1914, PRICE, TEN CENTS
SUPPORTERS Of ALASKA BILL IN COMPLETE CONTROL
Outlook For Alaska
Exhibit Not Good
A letter from Adolph C. Miller, chair
man of the Government Exhibit Board
of the Panama-Pacific Exposition, to
Gov. J. K. A. Strong indicates that the
outlook for an adequate Alaska exhibit
at the fair is uot good unless an extra
appropriation can be secured.
The letter, dated at Washington
Jan. 31, follows:
"Hon. J. F. A. Strong, Governor of Al
aska, Juneau. Alaska.
"My dear Governor Strong:
"The content of the Government ex
hibit at the Panama Pacific Interna
tional Exposition has been under con
stant consideration during the past
three months.
"The character and extent of Alas
ka's participation has been freely dis
cussed and your letter of November;
1st. has been carefully considered.
"It seems to be wholly Impossible
to represent Alaska upon a scale com-\
mensurate with the Seattle exhibit, fori
which $100,000 was appropriated. As'
you know the funds at our disposal
amount to only $500,000. With that
we must prepare, maintain, and return
exhibits of the entire United States!
Government, and in addition, of Alas
ka. Hawaii. Porto Rico, the District
of Columbia, and several semi-official
commissions. We must provide for
a total of 49 different bureaus and gov- j
ernmental agencies. You can well un
derstand that only a few thousand dol
lars can be allowed to any one bureau
or agency.
"It appears to be impossible, there
fore. to make a new collection of Alas
kan material with the funds available.
The best that seems possible is to col
lect (1) all that is in the several de
partments relating to Alaska, or as
much of it as practicable. (2) all that
remains of the Seattle exhibit, in the
museum of the University of Wash
ington and elsewhere, and (3) all that
can be collected from other sources
with little or no expense.
"It is not possible tc maintain a sep
arate organization for the exhibit by
tho #ropln?i?<?? ?' ~?4
the like, but we can procure the co-op
eration of government officers whose,
work relates to Alaska. Their work
will be co-ordinated and unified through
the officers of the Board.
"The lines which can. In all proba
bility. be fairly well shown in this way
are:
"1. Minerals, through the Geologi-;
cal Survey;
"2. Education, through the Bureau
of Education;
"3. Marine products, through the
Bureau of Fisheries;
"4. Agriculture, through the Office
of Experiment Stations;
"5. Forestry, through the Forest
Service;
"6. Zoology, through the Bureau of
Biological Survey;
"7. Ethnology, through the Nation
al Museum.
"The exhibition cases used at the
Alaska-Yukon-Paciflc Exposition were
loaned to the museum of the Universi
ty of Washington and are still availa
ble. Many of the exhibits which were
donated or purchased from exhibit
funds were also loaned to that museum
and may be recalled, but it is not
likely that much of that material would
be useful now.
"This is the situation as it now
stands. If you can devise any plans
or make any suggestions which can
be carried out with the means at our
disposal, we shall be glad to consider
them.
"Very truly yours,
"(Signed) ADOLPH C. MILLER.
"Chairman."
FOX FARMS ON LYNN
CANAL ARE PROSPERING
? E. P. Walker, deputy game warden
who returned on the Mariposa from
Haines and Skagway, says the fox
farms in the Chilkat valley and at
Dyea are prospering. T. D. Lahey,
who has the best farm on Lynn canal,
situated in the Chilkat valley, is mak<
ing particularly good progress. There
are 23 fine foxes on it. and they are
seemingly contented and making them
selves at home. There are eight foxet
on the farm of E. H. Richter. at Dyea
according to Mr. Walker, and the farir
promises we!':.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.
Maximum?II.
Minimum?31.
Cloudy, snow.
HAINES DEMOCRATS
WILL CELEBRATE
?
I The Democrats of Haines will give
a Sourdough ball and dinner for the
! benefit of the Democratic reading room
| February 20th, and the people of Ju
| ne&u are invited to attend. An an
| nouncement of the affair appears on
a big poster at Burford's corner, which
says there will bo vaudeville stunts
and singing between the courses. The 1
affair will start at S p. m. and last all
night. The menu contains the follow
ing items: ]
"Beans, sluiced and panned; spuds 1
in their parkas: hard tack on bed
rock; sandwiches, free milling."
PROSPECTING PARTY
OFF FOR LITUYA BAY
A party mostly made up of old sour
doughs this morning bought a three
months' outfit from W. R. Willis and
will leave on the Fox tomorrow or next '
day for Lituya bay. They are taking 1
along some appliances newly Invent- |
ed for the saving of very flno gold j
which is known to be in the beach
sands at that place.
The party consist of the following:
John W. Russell. M. Emery, E. Doyle, (
Patrick Qullty, A. WT. Rhyme. The
first named recently came out from
Dawson. Emery. Doyle and Qullty 1
have been in this section for some
time.
* * * 1
BIG STATE RIGHT FEATURE AT
THE GRAND TONIGHT
?+?
"What the Unknown Conceals," in *
two parts. State right feature, will be
shown here tonight, produced and act
ed by the famous Ambroslo Societa ?
Anoninio Film Co. The management
promises satisfaction. This is an ex
citing story of a crooked banker; every \
body should see It.
tiful photoplay of mounted police, and ^
a little side play of bravery.
"Topsy Turvy l.x>ve Affair," a good j
Reliance comedy, completes the pro
gram. ;
GOLDSTEIN BUILDING
BONDS ARE ATTRACTIVE
The building bonds issued by the i
Goldstein Improvement company for i
the purpose of erecting the handsome j
concrete building on the site now oc- y
cupied by the Goldstein stores, are I
being rapidly taken by the Juneau pui<
lie. Within the past two days $5,000 j
of Juneau money has been invested in
these securities. Being in denomina
tion of $100 each, they offer an Uei!
investment for the man of moderate '
circumstances. Of the $60,000 to be ]
issued $35,000 have already been sold '
and present indications point to a
speedy disposition of the enitre issue.
RENNER McKINLEY TRIAL
PROGRESSING SLOWLY
The Renner McKinley case is still
occupying the attention of the district
court. This forenoon the government
finished putting in evidence and the
defendant has been on the stand in
his own behalf this afternoon. There
are two interpreters In the case. Prank
Mercer for the government and Mrs.
Ole Orson for the defense with one
keeping check on the other.
FIREMEN WILL DANCE
ELKS' HALL TONIGHT
?+?
Tonight the Seventh Annual Grand
Ball of the Juneau fire department
will be given in Elks' hall. Everybody
has been looking eagerly forward to
this event for many weeks and now!
1 the time is here. It is expected that
a banner crowd will be out. The great,
? nine-piece, Juneau orchestra will fur
' nish the music. The hall has been
' tastefully decorated, and in fact noth
" ing left undone that would add to the
1 pleasure of those who will attend.
: Special ferry service has been ar
" ranged for Island folk and there will
1 be delegations present from both the
? Douglas and Treadwell fire depart
1 ments.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
Fresh ranch eggs by the dozen or
: case.
Rurbanks potatoes?the best?by the
pound, sack or ton.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 230.
SALMON TAX FOR
1913 COMING IN
The license tax from tho different
Arms and corporations engaged in the
salmon packing trade in Southeastern
Alaska for the year 1913 is slowly ac
cumulating in the office of tho clerk
of the district court. There are many
yet to bo heard from, but tho Federal
tax already paid in has reached a tidy
sum. Thus far only four of the can
neries have paid the Territorial li
cence tax In accordance with the rev
enue law passed by the legislature and
some of this money was paid under
protest
A list of those that, have already
paid the Federal tax and the amount
so received together with the pack
on which it is paid follows:
Alaska Packers'
Association: Tax Cases
Loring 35,579.64 139,491
(Vrangell 3,281.96 82,049 1
Northwestern Fish
eries Co. Tax Cases ,
Dundas Bay 31,301.04 32,526
tfunter Bay 1,492.92 37,323 ;
Juadro 1,406.48 35,162 ,
Janta Ana 1,376.88 34,397 j
Fldalgo Island Pack- ? v '
Ing Co.: Tax Cases 1
Ketchikan 32,000.56 5* *14 <
Port Graham 1,073.48 37 ?
rvlng Packing Co: Tax Cases
Karheen 31.006.64 25,166
George T. Myers
and Co.: Tax Cases
Chatham $2,844.88 71,122
No. Pacific Trading <
and Packing Co.: Tax Cases 1
?Clawack 31,629.20 40,730 I
Pure Food Fish '
Co.: Tax Casc3 '
vetchikan $1,050.48 26,262
i
Star - Collinson I
Packing Co.: Tax Cases ,
"forth Arm $ 674.80 16,870
Sunny Point Pack- (
Ing Co.: Tax Cases
Sunny Point $ 666.60 16,665
Walsh-Moore Can
ning Co.: Tax Cases j
Vard's Cove $ 367.08 9,177 j
- Tai CiiSTf
Vrangell .......... $ 749.44 18,736 t
F. C. Barnes & So.: Tax Ciees <
-ake Bay $1,137.62 28,178 ?
? ??? i
VLASKA BANKERS GREET <
ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE
B. M. Behrends, of Juneau, and Sam
lei Blum, of Valdez, headed the com
nittee of bankers which greeted Sec
retary of the Treasury William G. Me- i
\doo and Secretary of Agriculture Da- i
/id F. Houston at the Commercial Club
banquet at Seattle, Jan. 28th.
SKAGWAY BOY MAY
LOCATE IN JUNEAU
C. E. Talbot, of Skagway, who is a
visitor in Juneau at the Occidental
Hotel, may locate in this city. Mr.
Talbot has resided in Skagway most
of the years of his life. His father has
been connected with the White Pass
operating department since the early
days of that road's career.
"THE DAWNING"
At the Orpheum Theatre.
The Orpheum theatre tonight will
present "The Dawning," tho spocial,
two-reel, Vitagraph, society drama, one
of the strongest and classiest picture
plays offered this season. That beau
tiful and accomplished actress, Leah
Baird, and the tainted Earle Williams
feature in the leading roles. Earl Wil
liams now has a majority of over one
thousand votes in the Motion Picture
Magazine's contest for the most popu
lar actor of the moving picture world,
this showing his exceptional artistic
ability. Superb Btaging and beautiful
gowns are also features of this pro
duction.
"Private Smith," is fine romantic,
army drama, by the Lubln company.
"St. Augustine, Florida," 1b a pretty
scenic and descriptive picture of this
beautiful Southern city.
"Tho Horse that Woudn't Stay
Hitched," a laughable Kalem Western
comedy, will complete this exception
ally attractive program. Save your
coupons.
OUR BUYERS
in Los AngeleB, Portland, Seattle, Wen
atchee, Chicago and Montreal have
the fruit and vegetable field so syste
matically covered that anything, sea
sonable or not can at any time be had
at tho Royal Fruit Co. at lowest prices.
Shipments on every steamer. Leave
orders; free delivery. Phone 2-8-0.
| M'RCYNOLDS STARTS
DISSOLUTION SUIT
SALT LAKE, Utah, Feb. 12.?At
tornoy-Geuerul James C. McReynolds
has filed a suit asking for the com
plete dissolution of the Southern and
Central Pacific railroads.
VIRGINIA AUTHORITIES
ARREST EVELYN THAW
RICHMOND, Va., Feb. 12.?Evelyn
Thaw was attested last night just after
she had completed her turn at a lo
cal theatre. She had been warned by
Mayor George Alnsleo not to appear.
STEAMSHIP WAR
REACHES HIGHER-UPS
BERLIN, Feb. 11.?The action of
English steamship llneB In reducing
passenger rates Is regarded In Berlin
as a signal tot the opening of a great
ocean rate war. Tho HambW-g-Amer
lean and North German Lloyd lines
are feverishly,preparing for tho con
flict. So far the war has bocn con
fined to third cl&ss and steerage pas
sengers, but it 18 believed. the rate
cutting will now reach first and second
cabin rates. The Hamburg-American
is planning to invade the South Ameri
can field. - It is believed the war will
cost the two German 'companies $6,
)00,000.
COLOMBIA LOOKING
FOR EASY MONEY
NEW YORK, Feb. 12.?A Bogota spe
cial Bays the Colombian commercial
nterests express the utmost confidence
:hat tho government will get from $20,
)00,000 to $40,000,000 in the Panama
settlement with the United States,
rhls would liquidate $2,000,000 govern
ment deficit, build railroads, pay prcss
ng foreign claims and re-oqulp the
irmy.
FORMER ATTORNEY GENERAL
AGAINST ANTI-TRUST BILLS
NEW YORK, Feb. 12.?Former At
orney-Cenoral George W. Wickersham
i?s aUgjfod .the. Mitl-trunt bills that
idmlnlstratlon measures. He says
hey call for a system of governmental
espionage that Is contrary to the in
:ent of the constitution. Mr. Wicker
jham also was opposed to the curren
:y bill.
JOHN H. HUGHES, FORMER
ALASKAN, IS DEAD
? ?
SEATTLE, Feb. 12.?John H. Hughes,
n pioneer of the Klondike, died here
this morning. Hughes was prominent
In the early days of Dawson and Fair
banks. At one time he was manager
of a company owning several wharves
ut Dawson, and ho was engaged in
the mercantile and merchandise com
mission business at Fairbanks. Later,
ho was interested in trying to float a
big mining company in the Bonnlfleld
country.
REDEDSHEIMER ESTATE
TO WIFE AND NIECE
SEATTLE, Feb. 12.?The will of
Julius Redelsheimer gives, half of his
estate to his widow and the remainder
to his niece, Laura Lehmann, of Cin
cinnati, after a few minor bequests are
paid. The estate is valued at $750,
000.
RUSSIAN PREMIER
8TEPS DOWN AND OUT
ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. 12.?Vlad
1 Imcr N. Kokovsoff, premier of Russia,
resigned this morning.
ALTAR SOCIETY MEETS.
The Indies Altar Society of the Cath
olic church meets Friday afternoon in
Father Drathmon's residence.
ALASKAN HOTEL ARRIVALS.
The following arrivals are registered
at the Alaskan Hotel:
John Blase, I. Schoenfeldt, Tenakee;
A. L Mitchell, Portland; H. E. Shook
A. M. Goodman, D. I. Molr, B. F. Wat
son, Seattle; J. G. Sllngerland, Port
land; R A. McGregor, city; Mrs. Gilo
vich, Cordova; Jack Lane, Sheep creek
GREECE GETS MONEY
FROM THE FRENCE
+ -
PARIS, Feb. 12. ? Greece has ob
tained a loan of $100,000,000 in Paris
The issuance of the Turkish loan o
$120,000,000 has been postponed untl
May.
? ? ?- ..
Empire ads for results.
IMMIGRATION BILL
WILL GO THROUGH
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12.?Notwith
standing that there Is some sentiment
among somo of the Democratic Sena
tors against action on tho proposed
Immigration legislation at this session
the Senate commltto on Immigration
has determined to continue Its delib
erations on tho Burnett bill which re
cently passed the House and to report
It to the Senate as soon as possible.
It Is expected that the bill will pass.
FRENCH AVIATOR FLIES
OVER MOUNT BLANC
AOSTE, France, Fob. 12.?M. Parme
lln, the French, aviator, yesterday flow
over Mount Blanc, attaining un alti
tude during the flight exceeding three
miles above the sea level.
M'COMBS MAY BECOME
FRENCH AMBASSADOR
NEW YORK, Feb. 12.?Washington i
special to Now York Tribune says Will- I
lam F. McCombs will probably yield \
to the desires of President Woodrow i
Wilson and accept the ambassador- i
ship to Franco, In which event Secre- i
tary Joseph P. Tumulty would become j
chairman of Democratic National com
mittee.
FAVORS CITIZENSHIP
FOR PORTO RICANS i
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12.?Gov. Ar- J
thur Yager, of Porto Rico, Is In favor <
of a law which would give Porto Rl
cans citizenship in the United States. ]
LANE SUGGESTS OIL
PIPE LINE TO GULF
?i
WASHINGTON. Feb. 12.?Secretary ,
of the Interior Franklin K. Lane has i
suggested to the Senate appropriations i
committee that .an investigation be ?
made as to the practicability of the i
government constructing an oil pipe 1 <
line from Oklahoma to the Gulf of <
Mexico for the purpose o fcarrylng |
fuel oil to supply the naval Bhips In ?
tho Gulf.
jvnianv tnm? ? |j
DEFEATS SITKA TEAM.
SITKA, Feb. 12.?The Juneau high I
school basketball team defeated the j!
Sitka Athletic team last night in a i!
great game by a score of 26 to 8. All I
the Juneau players starred.
The members of the Juneau team (
will be guests of honor at a big recep- j
tion tonight
Returning on the Georgia, the mem-jl
hers of the Juneau team will reach Ju
neau tomorrow.
, , t j
CONVICTED RIOTERS
SET AT LIBERTY i
VANCOUVER, B. C., Feb. 12.?Four
teen miners, convicted of complicity
In tho labor riots that attended the
coal miners' strike, were admitted to
liberty yesterday by Justice Morrison,
the trial judge, on suspended sentence.
CANADA MAKES
CUT IN BUDGET
OTTAWA, Feb. 12?The Canadian
budget for the coming fiscal year, ex
clusive of supplementary estimates
and possible heavy railway subsidies
to be voted later. Is $190,736,170?a de
crease of $11,920,990 from last year's
estimate.
ARGENTINE SECURITIES
SHRINK $200,000,000
PARIS, Feb. 12.?The Figaro has
published figures to prove that Ar
gentine securities sold In Paris within
six months in 1911, the year of the Ar
gentine's greatest boom, have shrunk
to such an extent that the French in
vestors have lost $50,000,000.
ADVANCE IN RAIL RATES
WOULD RUIN OIL.COMPANIES
WASHINGTON. Feb. 12?The oil
companies east of the Mississippi riv
er have notified the Interstate Com
? merce commission that an advance of
? five per cent, in railroad ratcB would
? drive them out of busiuess. They say
? that with greater rail rates than those
? now obtaining they could not compete
with the pipe lines of the Standard Oil
company.
[
NOW IS THE TIME
i- to get a rubber hot water bottle or
i. a fountain syringe. The Juneau Drug
f Co, opposite the Alaska Hotel, Is sell
1 lng them at 25% discount All goods
guaranteed for 2' years. Will generally
last longer. This sale closes Mondaj
night 2- 12-3t
CUMBRE TUNNEL
BANDIT EXECUTED
'
EL PASO, Tex., Feb. 12. ? Bandit
Costillo and six of his followers
charged with the Cumbro tunnel dis
astear, wero captured yesterday and
executed at Chocolate Pass by Major
Juan Camonicgo, of the Constitution
alist army, according to a message
received by Gen. Villa.
DEMOCRATS SWEEP
2ND IOWA DISTRICT
DES MOINES, la., Feb. 12.?Almost
completo returns from the special elec
tion in the second Congressional dis
trict for the choice of a successor to
the late I. S. Pepper, Democrat, show
that Henry Vollmer, the Democratic
nominee, was overwhelmingly success
ful, defeating Republican and Pro
gressive nominees.
Democrats Rejoice.
WASHINGTON. Feb. 12.?The over
whelming victory of Henry Vollmer,
Democrat, in the Iowa second Con
gressional district election, has caused
great rejoicing in administration and
Congressional circles.
NEW YORK MAY GET
DISCOUNT COMPANY
4? ?
NEW YORK, Feb. 12.?The estab
lishment of a discount company for the '
purchase, guarantee and sale of com j
ncrcial paper under the now currency
aw is being discussed lu New York.
The lines of formation are based upon
:he great London discount companies,
which are leading factors In the dis
:ount markets abroad. Such a com
pany here would require $10,000,000
:apltal.
VEW JERSEY!jFACES
TRENTON, N. J., Feb. 12.?Control
ler Edwards of New Jersey sayB that
State Is facing a deficit this year of
52,300,000.
FAVOR SENATOR BORAH
FOR PRESIDENT NEXT
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12? It is be
lieved that the progressive Republican
Congressmen and citizens who are try- j
Ing to eliminate the Progressive party
by organizing tho Republican party
along progressive lines will support
Senator William E. Borah, of Idaho,
for President. It Is pointed out that J
Senator Borah has always been a pro
gressive, even going so far in 1896
as to support William J. Bryan for
President. At that time ho was a
free silver advocate. However, he
claims to be a Republican now.
CONGRESS MAY HIT
SHIPPING TRUST
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12.?The regu
lation of ocean steamship rates to pre
vent discrimination and to protect the
interests of small shippers is impera
tively needed, according to the forth
coming report of the House committee
on merchant marine and fisheries,
which was ordered to make an inves*
, tlgatlon into the so-culled shipping
trust. The report will strongly criti
cise the ship conferences or "pools,"
with the alleged purpose to control
cargo deliveries -and transportation.
MARCONI AND WESTERN
UNION IN DEAL
??fr?
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 12?A work
Ing arrangement has been effected be
;twccn tho Marconi Wireless Co. ol
America and the Western Union Tele
i graph Co. It Is conceded to be the
most important deal that has been ne
gotlated in telegraph, telephone anc
cable business in the history of th<
United States. The combination pro
vides for trans Atlantic and Pacific ser
vice that will be started with a blf
cut In rates. An outstanding featun
i Is the rate fight foreshadowed be
tween tho Marconi Wireless and th<
Western Union on one side and thi
Postal Telegraph and Commercial Co
bio companies on the other. Within thi
' next few months a complete tranu-At
; lantlc and trans-Pacific wireless sei
? vice will be started and will efTect a:
i entirely now telegraph and cable nei
' vice across the two oceans nnd th
r American continent.. It will also e:
tend from Alaska to Capo Horn.
[Railway Bill Goes
Over For One Week
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12. ? After a
day of brisk debate during the course
of which unfriendly amendments were
voted down the Alaska railroad bill -
went over last night untU next Wednes
day, February 18. The friends of the
measure time after time demonstrated
that they had an overwhelming ma
jority In the House, but Chairman Will
iam C. Houston, of the House commit
tee on Territories, said that the Pres
ident desired that there be the fullest
discussion possible and he deemed that
it was best for all concerned that
more time be allowed, so he would
make no further effort to force a vote
before adjournment The bill wtll
come up again next Wednesday, and
it is believed that there will be no ef
fort to prevent a vote then. Chairman
Houston said there is no question
about the final passage of the bill.
House Adopts One Amendment
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12?The House
of Representatives adopted only one
amendment to the Alaska railroad bill
yesterday. All others offered . were
voted down by the supporters of the
measure. The amendment adopted
was offered by Representative James
R. Mann, the Republican floor leader.
It leaves to the discretion of the Pres
ident the problem of handling the pro
posed railway after the government
buildB it.
In explaining his amendment Mann
said that he would leave the question
of leasing the road to private persons
or its operation by the government
to the President Ho pointed out that
the President might be confronted with
a situation in which the only available
lessees would be the Guggenheim in
terests or others who are heavily In
terested in Alaska, and that "in that
case he ought to be free to decline to
lease it at all." .
ocvcr.il mcmucrs niuibir mcawit,
The measure was vigorously attack
ed by several members both Democrat
J* ""'l Boniihllemv While moxt 0/
Republicans, the Democrats opposed
to it were put forward to make most
of the opposition speeches. Repre
sentatives John L. Burnett, of Ala
bama; Walter L. Hensley, of Missouri;
Oscar Colloway, of Texas, and Thomas
W. Hardwick, of Georgia, Democrats,
and Representative Soreno E. Payne,
former Republican leader and author
of the Payne-Aldrlch tariff bill, lead
the assault on the bill.
Representative Payne made the
strongest speech against the measure.
He characterized it as the "most rad
ical of a scries of socialistic propo
ganda adopted by the Democratic par
ty."
Underwood Champions Bill.
Democratic Leader Oscar W. Under
wood made the principal speech of the
day in support of the measure. In in
cisive and clear cut sentence that
characterize hiB utterances he disposed
of the arguments advanced by tho op
ponents of the measure in rapid suc
cession. "The suggestion that this
bill contains the germ of socialism,"
said Underwood, "takes me back 12
years to the time when we were de
bating the first Irrigation bill in this
House. The same cry was raised then,
but no one today will contend that the
government irrigation policy has been
a failure."
Underwood said that he would not
favor government construction of rail
roads in the States of the United
States, "because it is not necessary
for it to do so. We have the rail
roads and the power to regulate them."
Would Make Alaska an Asset
"Government action is necessary in
Alaska," said Mr. Underwood, "in or
under to make Alaska an asset in
stead of a liability."
> Houston Mas oonuui ui ??
Chairman of tho House committee
, on Teritories, Representative William
_ C. Houston, of Tennessee, had charge
I of the bill during tho debate, and his
? leadership wis ably seconded by Dem
_ ocratlc leader Underwood, who was
on the floor and ready with suggos
F tions when needed. Republican Lead
3 er Mann was in complete harmony
with Chairman Houston and Leader
3 Underwood in the management of the
a measure and in their support of it.
Amendments Defeated.
e All the hostile amendments that
were offered by those opposing tho
.. passage of the bill were rejected by
u emphatic majorities.
e D. G. Argall, who has been at the
c- Perseverance mine, left for the South
on the Mariposa.

xml | txt