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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 16, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
- v '.v - ? ? ' ' . . ??:
VOL. III., NO. 384.
JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY; fEB. 16,1914.
PRICE, TEN CENTS
GUGGENHEIMS TO BUILD MORE RAILROADS AND SHIPS
" v ' ' r- - ' ' ? ? , ?
What Alaska-Gastineau
has Done in Past Year
???
?==- <
The Alaskka Uastineau Mining
Co. disbursed during the year
1913. for construction, develop
ment and equipment the sum of
$2,500,000. Of this immense
sum the gross payroll paid In Al
aska. umouuted to $1,079,000.
Material and supplies were
purchased from the merchants of
Juneau during the same period
amounting to more than $500,000.
The average number of men
employed each month through
out tl?$ year on construction and
development was 762.
The greatnest number of men
employed during any one month
was 960.
4 ?4
The constructive and development
program now being carried out by the
Alaska Gastineau Mining company was
decided upon and authorized in July.
1912, and there has been no cessation
from the activity since operayons be
gan. The essential features of this
program included the development of
th.? Perseverance mine, building of the
mills, and development of the neces
sary power to run both the mines and
the mills.
Such development and construction
entailed the following work in the
three divisions which may be describ
ed as fololws:
The Perseverance Division: Devel
opment of the mine by means of drifts,
shafts, oreways, ore chutes, haulage
system, etc., to that stage where the
mine could economically deliver 6,000
or more tons of ore per day.
The construction of a mine camp
with boarding houses, dining room,
compressor plants, warehouses, store
rooms, machine shop, etc., necessary
to the successful operation of the mine.
The building of a transportation sys
tem three miles in length. Ten thous
and feet of this transportation system
being a tunuel known as the Sheep
creek Adit tunnel. This transporta
tion system Is to handle 6,000 and more
tons of ore per day and deliver the
same from the mine at the Persever
ance to the mills at Sheep creek.
The construction of an experimental
plant and the operation of the same
in order to determine the exact metal
lurgical treatment of the ore. This
had to be accomplished in sufficient
time so that the design of the actual
mills could be completed during the
year 1913.
Power Supply Division: The build
ing of pipe lines, flumes, power houses
and the construction of a concrete dam
for the purpose of storihg water over
the short periods so that the whole
project wculd develop an all-year-round
power of at least 6,000 horsepower
which will be transmitted for use in
the operations of the mine and mills.
Sheep Creek Division: Construction
of 6.0C0 tons per day milling plant
and all of the necessary machine shops,
boarding houses, woodworking plant,
townsite, warehouses, stores, etc.. ne
cessary to the economical operation of
such milling plant.
Began in July, 1912.
Activity toward completing the en
tire program began in July. 1912, short
ly after it was decided upon, and it
lo to he finished and Dut in operation
by December 31. 1914. The report of
General Manager B. L. Thane for the
year 1913 will show that great strides
have been made along the lines of
development and construction decided
upon.
Perseverance Division.
At Perseverance, during the year
1913, a 500-man dining room, club
house, butcher shop, mine office, store
room, warehouse were completed. Al
so a new bunk house for 120 men, dry
room for the mine crew, additional
machine shop capacity, new staff
house, several new cottages were con
structed. also auxiliary hospital: al
so a new compressor building was con
structed and the first of the 3000-cubic
foot synchronous motor-driven, Nord
berg compressors was installed.
The camp is all equipped with mod
ern steam heating plant and all mod
ern equipment in the way of cooking
devices for the kitchen and bath rooms.
(Continued on Page Three.)
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?40.
Minimum?34.
Precipitation?.65.
Cloudy.
.! SMITH'S fATE MAY
HANG ON TANGO
The prosecution of B. Smith, indicted
for selling liquor to ludi&ns was fin
ished and the "case given to tfco jury
before noon today. The fate of the
defendant may or may not rest on the
fact that Tommy Wilson, the intelli
gent native Alaska Indian to whom he
sold liquor, cannot dance the tango.
Attorney Z. R. Cheney put up a good
light toward demonstrating that the
chief witness for the government, Ton*
my Wilson, is entitled to be classed as
a citizen.
The court's instructions to the Jury
were very explicit on the matter of
citizenship and the requisites held to
be necessary are of a high order. The
question will be decided by the Jury
as to whether or not Tommy Wilson
measures up to the demands.
Questioned by the court he said that
Wood row Wilson jvas president of the
United States; that Theodore Rooso
velt hud been president; that William
H. Taft was the President Just preced
ing Wilson; and that George Washing
ton was the first President of the Unit
?ed States. He'also confessed to read
ing magazines and newspapers.
During the progress of the trial Tom
i my Wilson was closely questioned to
bring out whether or not he had abai>
do nod his tribal relations; also what.
if any. social relations he had with
civilized people. He was shown to
have abandoned his right to an inter
?est In an alleged tribal house volun
tarily. disclaiming any tribal rights or
relations whatsoever. It was brought
out that he attended social functions
such as dances. He said that be
danced the waltz and two-step, but.
alas, confessed his inability to nego
tiate the tango.
The Jury consists of the following:
H. S .Graves, Jerry Cashen, John Day.
Fred Anderson. K. O. Johnson. S. G.'
Holt. Fred Hebert, Robert Keeny, M.
E. Russell, George Simpkins, R. G.
pay. and Frank Doverspike.
The government called John Shakes.
Tommy Wilson and George Shakes,
and the defense has called Tommy Wll-1
son, Chester Worthington. head of the
Native Alaska Brotherhood, and W. G.
Beattie. superintendent of Indian
schools for Southeastern Alaska.
DISTRICT COURT NOTES.
Demurrer Over-ruled.
Judge R. W. Jennings this morning
over-ruled the demurrer to the indict
ment in the case of George L. Rice.
New Trial Denied.
Th ? motion of Attoruey A. B. Calla
han for a new trial in the case of
"Rm}"_ Frank Lewis, convicted of rob
bery, wad denied by Judge R. W. Jen
nings this morning.
Ashby Against Hyde.
Judge R. W. Jennings this morning
denied the motion of plaintiff in the
case of Ashby against Hyde, for a re
consideration of the decision made in
the matter.
Sam Jackson Arrested.
Sam Jackson, indicted in 1912 on
the charge of selling liquor to Indians
and out of custody on his recognizance,
was arrested on a bench warrant this
morning and will go to trial soon.
RIG 80-LAP ROLLER
RACE ON TONIGHT
Tonight, Thomas Johnson of Doug
las meets Jacob Clark of Juneau for
the native championship of Alaska, at
Jaxon's rink. Three reels of pictures
and 80 laps of roller racing for 25c to
balcony. Skates same price as usual.
| Racers will receive 50 per cent, of
gate receipts and side bet. Race starts
after pictures, 9:30 o'clock.
J.H.S. Band Rehearsal* Tonight.
The J.H.S band will hold their reg
ular, Monday night practice in their
rehearsal room at the city hall this
evening at 8 o'clock. There Is still
sime new music yet to be rehearsed.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
Fresh ranch eggs by the dozen or
case.
Burbanks potatoes?the best?by the
pound, sack or ton.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
M. K. Kroeger, representing a Port
land brewing company, is in Juneau.
I WEATHER CHANGE
j BRINGS MORE POWER
Tho heavy rains of the past two or
three days have made a material
change for the better as regards min
ing operations In the vicinity of Ju
neau. All of the heavy operators have
been handicapped for the past sevor
al weeks for lack of power and In
jseveral Instances portions of crews. 1
iand even whole crews were laid off j
temporarily. t
? J'hree shifts are again working on .
thv big Ebner tunnel since the rain \
commenced to increase the flow of '
Gold creek. Downie D. Muir, who is 1
: superintendent in charge of the work !
i reports that good progress is again
being made on the work. The tunnel c
is now extended more than bdlf a mile. -
' It is not anticipated that there will f
' be another great shortage of water ?
! during the winter. Mr. Muir thinks I
j that there Is more water flowing in
Gold creek now than at any time sinco
; last September.
The lack of power has borne quite
heavily on tho Alaska Gastineau's op
erations, and if the present weather
conditions continue it is likely that
many men temporarily laid off will be
> put back to work. Labor Agent L. J.
Reedy said that thus far he had had
no calls from any of the divisions for
men. v
I - J
POPULAR LINER BEING 'c
GREATLY IMPROVED ju
The Seattle Railway and Marine c
News, writing of the Improvements:
that will make almost a new craft of t
the Pacific Coast Steamship company's L
popular liner City of Seattle, says: i
"Two new Scotch marine type boil- J
I ers are being Installed and steel sides
are being built between the main deck
and the Baloon deck in place of wood
en sides- as heretofore. The dining
room is being enlarged to seat S6 per- ^
sons. The second class quarters have '
I O
been re-arranged on the main deck
forward with large, well-ventilated
space. The pilot house and deck offi
cers' quarters have been raised one j
deckhand on the boat deck an -obser
vation room has been constructed.
Two new sets of double winches are
being Installed, one aft and one for
ward, these to facilitate the handling < ,
of cargo. New masts and booms will; s
be Installed, capable of handling six- y
ton lifts with ease. The arrangement, ?
of the first class accommodations has a
,not been altered, but the vessel Is be-: 1
lng furnished throughout with practi
cally all new fittings and the cost ojf; f
the work on this one vessel will ap- t
proximate $100,000."
? ? ? : g
INTERIOR MEN GOING t
INTO BUSINESS HERE
* I
Work was commenced this morning;
toward the erection of a new building!
on Front street on the Jaeger property
just below the Alaska laundry. The ^
land is under lease to J. Homer of .In-! (
noko and A. N., Sfockof, formerly, of (
Fairbanks. The,lessees are.p^tt^ j
their own building and,.yr)U estpb}|sh |f
a billiard parlor in It as soon as it is [1
completed. ;%
The location is very favorable and. .
the place should do a successful busl- f
uess. .
- . . . 1
PORTLAND LINE MAY \
BEGIN THIS MONTH <]
Word hau been received thnt owing (
to the Alaska business offering at Port- ,
land the Pacific Steamship company (
will begin its weekly sailings from
Portland about February instead of
waiting unti) March 1st. In. addition:
to its service from Portland, the new
steamship company proposes to oper-!
I ate two steamers from Seattle on the ^
Southeastern Alaska run and one from
Portland to Puget Sound and British (
Columbia ports. (
ALASKA WEATHER SCORES
AGAINST EAST AGAIN J
The weather map for February 7th, j
received by I. J. Sharick, shows that '
Alaska has scored again on the East
for weather. On that day the Juneau
temperature was two degrees above
freezing. The weather was as cold 1
or colder than that obtaining here at |'
all Atlantic coast points north of Wash-1'
ington, at all Central Western points'1
north of the Ohio river, as well as '
throughout Western Texas clear down '
to the Mexican line, nearly all of Mex
ico, all of Northern Arizona, and all
sections north. All Puget Sound cities
showed weather conditions as cold as 1
they were at Juneau, also all Oregon <
towns as far as Coos Bay. ' i
Whether you like Havana or domes
tic cigars, you can get the kind you !
like at Burford's. 2-16-tf 1
American Schooner is
Wreck on Bird Island;
l . ? V 3 -u- J- ? 1 )
. *5,. > >Ar- . ? ? ;
' A i "
Gov. J. F. A. Strong received a c&
>legram today from United States Mar
thai Brennrnan, of Valdez, conveying
he news of the wrecking of the Amer
can schooner W. H; Dlmond on Bird
sland, Feb. 2. The &looner is a com
)leto wreck, but her crew was saved
md Is at Unga.
The cablegram to Gov. Strong, re
:elved this morning,- and signed by
Marshal Urennoman, at Valdez, was us
ollows:
"Have today received.the following
. .telegram from United States Commis
, sloner Driffield. Unga: 'Have ship
wrecked crew of ten from schooner
Dlmond, wrecked on Bird Island, of
' Shumagln group, the second instant.
- The schooner Is a total > loss. All
1 bands saved."*
TUe .W. H. Dlmond Is of 390 tons
- rose register and 376 tons net register.
166.feet long, 35.5 feet beam, and was!
> built in 1881 at San Francisco from
I which port she Is registered.
Mexican Newspaper Bitterly
Arraigns President Wilson
' ^ ? * .
M'" CICO CITY, Feb..16.?Despite tho
ran ig of American Charge ^"Affaire*
<els< O'ShauRhnessy. the*. RT* Impar
lal jsterdny contained a>;three col
inn irst page story benrlr^f the head
ing 'The Word of Wilson Lacks Hon
ir As He Does HlmscK." i
The article bitterly arraigned the
American President.
The j?rtlcle} has greatly incensed the
Americans %ho-arje living in this city.
Henry Lane Wilson to Visit Mexico.
MEXICO CITY, Fob. 1G.?It 1b re
ported here that Henry Lane Wilson
will return to this city shortly for a
visit
IURY CONVICTS
DETECTIVE AGENTS
HOUGHTON, Mich.,-Feb. 16.?Four
letective agency guards were found
;ullty of manslaughter Saturday for
Lllling Steve Putrlch, a striking miner.
WORST STORM IN
- YEARS IN EAST
NEW YORK. Feb. 16. ? A snow
torm,,envelopes the East that is the
vorst that has occurred in years. The
now 8.torm came out of the Southwest,
md extends from Baltimore to the Ad
rondacks.
Nine lives were lost last night when
our barges broke adrift in Ix>ng Is!
tnd sound.
The total fatalities during the cold
ipell that has the country In its grasp
las reached 28.
'RISONER WAS WELL
ARMED AND IRONED
?*?
Late Saturday-Knight a bibulous pll
prim- from Sheep 'creek, after accumu
atlng a jaig of' considerable propor
lOHEyJald down Oil the;side walk of!
ower., Front ' Wb?t> for -a'i comfortable
iloep. The heavy" downrpour of rain
iad no terrors tot htm; but Officers
ilcBride and Alderman came^along
ind took him into- custody. When
searched at the city jail he was found
0 be in possession of a revolver nearly
1 foot long. It waB a Colt, manufact
ired at least 45 years ago, and was
l&igned for percussion cap and muzzle
oading ball. The ancient fire arm was
ied together with bits of string. The
veapon looks formidable at a dls:
ance.
-ESTER McCONAGHY
i' ? " VISrtlNG'IN JUNEAU
Lester McConaghy, of the North
veBtern Fisheries company, Seattle, ar
?ived on the last trip of the Northwest
)rn and is visiting his brother Capt. J
Charles McConaghy, and sister, Mrs.
E. W. Pettlt, of Juneau. Mr. McCona
;hy expects to leave for his home on
;he Princess Maqulnna.
t
KLAWACK MANAGER
VISITS-"CHANNEL TOWNS
Tom Barry, manager of the com
pany storo ati'Klawack^ arrived, in Ju
lcau on'the Northland, ycsterdap and
s visiting friends in Jufieau and Doug
hs. Yesterday he spent a part of the
lay with Mayor M.' J. O'Connor of
Douglas.
ROYAL FRUIT CO.
Phone 280.
las a large shipment on the NorthweBt
;rn, including butter, eggs and prod
ice, also a line of Itnerglace fruits.
Our eggs are the finest on the mar
ket. Our "customers are our best
advertisers. Ask them about our eggs.
iTee. defl Very. 2-14-tf
NEW YORK STATE i
TREASURER SUICIDES.
BUFFALO, N. Y., Fob. 16?John J.
Kennedy, of this State, committed sui
cide yesterday. He had been worrying
for several days about his Impendingj
appearance before the grand jury to |
testify concerning his knowledge of
giaft scandals.
GEORGE R. NOBLE
COMING BACK SOON
Advices received from George R.
Noble, now In New York, state that
he Is now in New York conferring with I
large financial Interests relative to the'
transfer and disposal of the*ihlnlngi
properties held by himself and asso-'
elates near Juneau; and that while1
business matters have detained him in 1
New York longer than was expected,!
the business has progressed so far j
that Indications point to his early re-1
turn to Juneau.
PRES. RECK CALLS
SPECIAL MEETING
President John Reck, of the Juneau
Commercial club, says that Juneau
must get behind Gov. J. P. A. Strong
and Delegate to Congress James Wick
ersham In tho matter of securing an
adequate appropriation to have Alas
ka properly represented at the great
Panama-Pacific Exposition.
In order to get action on the matter
President Reck has issued a call for
a meeting of the Commercial club to
be held in the council chambers Thurs
day night at 8 o'clock sharp. Every
one Interested in the welfare of Alas
ka is urged to come out. A full at
tendance of the club Is desired.
FIRE LADDIES WILL
MEET AND SMOKE
The Juneau fire lads will smoke-up
tomorrow night. Their little social af
fair is to be held in the headquarters
tomorrow night at 8 o'clock and will
be for firemen only. The last event
J was a big time with invitations out to
| prominent business men and citizens.
G. A. BALDWIN ARRIVES, ALSO
FURNITURE FOR HEIDELBERG
Grant A. Baldwin, for many years
a prominent citizen of Haines, who re
cently bought in with George Burford
in the new Heidelberg billiard parlors,
arriyed from Haines on the Georgia
last night.
All of the tables and fixtures for the
new branch of tho Heidelberg estab
lishment arrived on tho Northwestern
and the work of installing the same
will soon be under way. It is expect
ed to have a grand opening at the
Heidelberg within tho next few days.
PIONEERS' MEETING.
Juneau Igloo, No. 6, Pioneers of Alas
ka, will hold a regular session in Odd
Fellows' hall tomorrow nlghL It is
expected that there will be a large at
tendance.
Big Syndicate to Extend
Rail And Ship Lines
PENNSYLVANIA HAS
HO]Jj\MPAIGN ,
WASHINGTON, Fob. 16. ? What
promises to bo the bitterest political
flght Pennsylvania has had In years
has been already Inaugurated In con
nection with the contest for thfe United .
States Sonate-. The candidates are j
Senator Boles Penrose, Ropubllcan;
Representative A. Mitchell Palmer,
Democrat, and Gilford Plnchot, Pro
gressive. All three parties will con
duct an active canvass for the elec
tion. Former President 'Roosevelt has
been booked for a two weeks' cam
paign for Plnchot.
ONE KILLED AND FIVE
HURT JJY. AUTOMOBILE.
' ' f '* -,
lJ0S ANGELES, Feb. 10. ? Dave
Lewis, a contestant for the Vandcrbllt
cup In the automobile races that are
underway here, lost control of his au-1
tomobile this morning, and running
into the crowd, killed Louis G. Smith j
and wounded Ave others.
+ . 0
GOVERNMENT TO INVESTIGATE
CAUSE OF UNEMPLOYED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 16.?A Federal J
Investigation will be made Into the ,
condition of, the unemployed and the -
cause In the larger cities of the coun
try-by the industrial relations commts- j
slon.
4 #
SUFFRAGETTES CAUSE
A SEVERE PANIC,
BLACKBURN. England, Feb. 16.?
Suffragettes at daybreak this morning!
fired a cannon that was captured by
the British from the .Russian in the |
Crlmlan war. The whole city was:
shaken by the explosion, and a panic,
followed.
WORLD OWES FORTY-THREE
BILLION DOLLARS
ANTWERP. Feb. 16.?The Bureau of
Universal Statistics gives the public:
debt of the world at $43,000,000.000,,
and the population at 1,900,000,000. |
COUNT AOKI, AGED
JAP STATESMAN, DEAD
i TOKYO, Feb. 16. ? Viscount Aokl, j
the Japanese statesman, died here yes-,
I terday.
AL-KI SAILS FOR NORTH
WITH MANY PASSENGERS ^
SEATTLE, Feb. 16.?The Al-Kl sail- j
ed for Alaska Saturday night with 42 j
passengers for Juneau, as follows: j
Mrp. M. H. Trlesdple, Chris Jensen,
Alex Cumming8, C- E. Smith, W. Y. j
Hammll. C. J. Johnson. C. L. Brown,
A. H. Williams, Chris Olson, A E. John
son E. J. Klrchoff and wife. H. O. Han
son', Miss Klrchoff, N. Arndzen. E. A.
Nelson. J. C. Paradise, William Tay
lor, F. W. Uriah. Olaf Arness, H. Am
stedt. and twenty-one steerage.
PRESIDENT WASHINGTON
REBECCAS VISITING HERE
Mrs. Campbell, president of the
state of Washington Rebeccas, arrived
on a recent boat for the purpose of
inspecting the Rebecca, lodges of this j
section. Last week she visited with
the Douglas lodge and last Saturday
night the Jupeau Rcbeccaft gave a ban
quet In her honor at Odd Fellows' hall.
The Alaska Rebeccas are In the Wash
ington jurisdiction.
This Is the first time an oificer of
the State of Washington Rebeccas has
visited Alaska. While in Juneau Mrs.
' Campbell is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
\\r# w. Casey. According to present
plans Mrs. Campbell will leave for the.
South on the Admiral Sampson tomor
row.
BIG MASQUERADE FEB. 19.
! Don't make any engagement that will
keep you away from the Athletic Clu
Masquerade Ball on Thursday evening.
Feb. 19, at Elks' hall.
A late ferry has bepn arranged for
to take the people living In Douglas.
Treadwell and Sheep creek home af
ter the. dance.
The Juneau Athletic Club gives
dances every Thursday evening. 2-16-4t
Have some fun! Tickle the Ivories j
at Burford'fl. 2-16-tf. j
SEATTLE, Feb. 16.?President R.
W. Baxter, of the Alaska Steamship
company, announced today that as soon
as the Alaska railroad bill is signed by
the President, the Alaska Syndicate
will expend millions in building spurs
and branches of its Alaska railroad
and additional steamships to handle
the traffic that will develop with Al
aska. He said the plans and arrange
ments for the beginning of the work
are already under way, and that the
actual work of construction will begin
at once with the opening of spring.
GILL MAY LEAD
IN PRIMARY
?f
' * k
?SEATTLE, Feb. 16?Seattle's primary
election will take place tomorrow, af
ter an exciting and bitter campaign.
It is now generaly conceded that for
mer Mayor Hiram C. Gill will lead in
the race. The contest for the selec
tion of a candidate to run against him
is a neck and neck race with J. D.
Trenholme, Austin E. Griffiths and
Itichard Wlnsor, the Socialist, all with
in winning distance. The other six
candidates, it is conceded, have no
Bchance to win.
ARMY TO SURVEY
NOME HARBOR
WASHINGTON, Feb. 16. ? Under
provisions placed in the rivers and
hnrbors appropriation bill through the
efforts of Kepresentative Will E. Hum
phrey today, a survey will be made of
Nome harbor by army engineers.
"The provision is broad," explained
Humphrey, "and engineers may report
on the construction of a breakwater or
for dredging Snake river so that ves
sels may enter, or any other form of
improvement that will aid navigation."
MRS. BRYAN PREVENTS
BREAKING OF PLEDGE
? ?
NEW YORK. Feb. 16. ?Observing
her husband, when proposing a toast,
Saturday night at the Author's League
banquet, about to partake of cham
pagne which he had mistaken for wa
ter, Mrs. Bryan, wife of Secretary of
State William J. Bryan, sprang from
her seat and put her hand over the
glass. Mr. Bryan noticed the error
and exchanged glasses.
POLICE AND MOB MIX;
100 ARE INJURED
?+?
SOUTH BEND. Ind., Feb. 16.?One
hundred persons were injured when a
squad of police attempted to aid the
sheriff to enforce an order of court
yesterday directing that Rev. Stanis
laus Gruza be placed in charge of St.
Casinurs Polish Roman Catholic
church.
FAIRBANKS MAN IS
CHARGED WITH BIGAMY
FAIRBANKS, Feb. 16?A deputy
United States marshal left here with a
warrant for the arrest of M. E. Bon
dlxen, an aged veterinary surgeon,
who is charged with bigamy. He was
married to Martha Nelson on the 7tb,
and both left hero saying that they
were going to Point Barrow. It is
charged that he married a Swedish
girl at Chena seven years ago. that she
is still living and that there has been
no divorce.
TWO LONDON FAMILIES
ARE WIPED OUT
..LONDON, Feb. 16?The murdering
of two whole families by the husbands
and fathers followed by suicide yester
day shocked the people of London,
Walter Johnson strangled his wife and
three children and then hanged hjm
self, and James Standcn shot his three
sleeping children and then took his
own life.
TOM SHARKEY GETS BAD
AND GOES TO JAIL
NEW YORK, Feb. 16?Tom Shark
ey, former prizefighter, was sentenced
to jail this morning for a month for
maintaining a disreputable house.
When hungry, hit the trail for the
Stampede, corner Front and Franklin.
2-12-tf.

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