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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 17, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager.
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Owe year, hy mall 310.00
Six months, by mall 6-OC
Per month, delivered I OC
ALASKAN INDIANS AND CITIZENSHIP.
THE ultimate destiny of the Indians of Alaska is full Americar
citizenship with its rights and manifold duties, including
the right to vote and participate in all the affairs of gov
ernment. This is the prize that should be held up by the white
race as an inducement for the Indians of the North to adjust
themselves to the fast changing conditions in this Territory. AH
assistance should be rendered the Indians in the work that they
have undertaken in their organization, the Alaska Native Broth
erhood, the purpose of which is better to qualify the members of
their race for citizenship when the time shall arrive to bestow it
upon them.
However, no real friend of the Indians should urge that the
franchise be granted to them until they are ready to use it in
telligently. The need for care in this respect is all the greater
because of the unsettled conditions. The status of our govern
ment is in process of evolution. The duties of citizenship in Al
aska for the next few years will require educated intelligence of
a high order. The road leading toward the future commonwealth
should be marked by those who have had experience in self-gov
ernment and self-restraint. The work that lies tf&fore us is not
that which should be performed by a race that is just emerging
from conditions of barbarism.
The welfare of both the white race and the Indians in Alas
ka demands that we should profit by the bitter experience of the
South from the premature enfranchisement of a race unaccus
tomed to self-government. The situation demands more of citi
zens than most of the Indians are qualified to render. It would
be a cruel injustice to them to place burdens upon them that they
are not prepared for.
Allen Weir, Washington's first Secretary of State, has con
tributed a last word to the discussion of the question as to the
proper age at which to marry, a problem that is still holding the
attention of many Eastern newspapers, preachers and sociolo
gists. Mr. Weir applies Artemus Ward's rule for setting hens.
Artemus said that "the best and in fact the only proper time to
set a hen is when she wants to set."
NEW NATIONALISM GONE MAD.
MRS. EVA MORLEY MURPHY, who announces her candi
dacy for the Progressive nomination for Congress in Kan
has, has adopted a platform for herself that should bring
joy to New Nationalists. She favors National prohibition, Na
tional woman suffrage, National workmen's compensation, Nation
al minimum wages, and National anti-child labor laws, etc.
All of these matters have heretofore been regarded as prop
er subjects for State control, and headway has been made in the
regulation of each of them by the separate States.
The disposition of some of our Progressive friends to take
every reform to the National government is not in the interest of
real progress. Progress is made faster by permitting the more
progressive States to take the lead and demonstrate the useful
ness of different methods. Those that prove satisfactory are
taken up immediately by other States, and amended in such way
as to make them applicable to conditions within their boundar
ies. By this method they spread from State to State.
The practicability of the workingmen's compensation law,
for instance, under State control has been demonstrated. The
law is now in effect in Washington, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin,
California and Oregon, and New York has just enacted it. That
it will be passed by other States is a foregone conclusion. It is
working perfectly in Washington, the first State to develop it in
its fullest measure. ?
In fact, it has been demonstrated in Alaska that workmen's
compensation can be worked out even without a State-wide
law. The Treadwell mines have a perfectly working industrial
insurance system in full operation in their business, and it is
giving so much satisfaction that there has not been a personal
injury damage suit against the Treadwell company for almost
a decade, notwithstanding that more than 1500 men have been
employed there all the time.
Every town in the country?not an exception between Ma
chias and Barrow?has a champion baseball team. There is not
a doubt about it. It has been decided during the winter beyond
question or cavil. Every radiator fan will present to you the
indisputable evidence if you will give him half a chance at
any time before the opening of the baseball season.
The Prince Rupert Empire says Whitehorse was named in
honor of "Stroller" White, who got his name from the "languid
way in which he starts on a stampede." That is about two horses
on White.
??? .
HOW FAIRBANKS
RECEIVED GOOD NEWS
This is the Fairbanks News' descrip
tion of the receipt of the news of
the pasasge of the Alaska rail
road bill by the people of the Tanana
metropolis:
"Everybody is happy. The Alaska
railroad bill passed the Senate this
afternoon and all Fairbanks is cele
brating, the whistles of the city hav
ing announced the glad tidings short
ly ofter two o'clock this afternoon.
"Simultaneously with the blowing
of the N. C. whistle, a fire alarm was
turned in at the city hall and the boys
of the fire department therefore had a
run in celebration of the big event
However, the alarm proved to be a
false one. as, when both rigs of the
department reached the N. C. wood
yard. where the fire was supposed to
be. all they found was a laborer pil
ing wood and not dreaming of fires,
railroads or anything else.
"The origin of the first alarm seem:
to be a mystery. It being the opinlot
of some that a practical joker wai
back of the entire proceeding. Th<
boys of the fire department Bay tha
it makes no difference to them ai
long as they made the run as a cele
bration, although they are of the opln
ion that the joker, whoever he wai
could have given them a much shortei
run had he wished.
"Shortly after the news from Wash
ington was received at the News-Mine
office and telephoned over town, thi
flags began to come to the fore. Th<
flag over the American Bank of Alas
ka was the first to come to light, th<
banner at the First National Bank be
ing a close second. Other prepara
tions for a celebration are still belni
made, and the city will therefore b
In gala attire all day tomorrow.
"Excitement is at its height all ove
the city. On all corners people ar
to be Been talking over the passage
of tho bill and many are the congratu
lations and handshakes which are be
ing passed among the business men
and the citizens in general. 'Pros
? perity for Fairbanks.' seemed to bo
- the general slogan.
: "Among those who are out with ap
? propriate decorations is the Sourdough
I Express. One side of their light rig \ ;
is covered by a painting representing jj ;
the new Alaska railroad coming into ? >
' the Fairbanks terminal station. j!
j " ' . j;
CLASSIFIED ADV. | !
'|l i :
r :
? WANTED?Active woman for all- ,
. around work in small boarding bouse. \
Phone 432, Douglas. Corbet Boarding ? ?
, | House. 2-17-tf. ! !
! WANTED?Lady to do neat, hind- | |
1 sewing, work can be done at home. P. ?1
0. Box 632. Give phone number. 17tf
^
WANTED?First class bakor. Ap- ?
ply Labor Department, Alaska-Gastin- ]!
eau co. ii-4-tf ;;
, (t
FOR RENT?Furished rooms and ?>
apartments, eltaer single or ensulto ??
for housekeeping. Apply at office, No. *[
1, Hogan's Flats. Phone 2-0-9. 11-11-tf < *
FOR RENT?Modern rooms with < >
bath, by the month, apply upstailrs f,
over Juneau * Drug Co., or at the ~
Grand theatre. 2-9-tf
FOR RENT?Masquerade costumes
or suits made to order. Mrs. Schwartz
enbcrg. Douglas Island. 2-9-12L
FOR SALE?Restaurant, bakery and
butcher shop at Tenake Hot Springs at _
a reasonable price. Apply John W. +
Blase, Tenakee Hot Springs. 2-9-12C ^
FOR SALE?Cheap, for cash, the < >
Owl Cafe, 396 Front street Long !!
lease, low rent, a monoy maker. Ap- J [
ply on premises. 2-14-6t ' *
FOR SALE OR RENT?New gas o
launch, 38 x 10, with good accommo
dutions for 4 men; 20 h.p. engine. Ap- J *
ply "Gas Launch," Empire office 2-5? < ?
Eat at the Stampede. Best meal in <
the city at the price. 2-12-tf
?<
Mr. J. Sumpf Is organizing a violin 4
class. All those wishing Instructions \ j
leave call at Doran's drug store; also ;;
mandolin and guitar. 1-26-tf. ? ?
Good board and rooms by the day, !!
week or month. Rates reasonable. St ? ?
George House, formerly the Simpson [ j
hospitaL 10-3-tf , ,
FRESH SEALSHIPT oysters at ;;
Goldstein s. 10-9-tf. ! !
| Alice M. Jordlson, teacher of mando- ? ?
i lin, guitar and banjo; studio 5 and 6 ? .
Garside building, or enquire Juneau j j
! Music Store. 2-4-tL J |
ROYAL FRUIT CO., SEWARD ST. ! !
Wholesale and retail fruit dealers. !!
Free delivery. Phono 280. 1-22-tf. ] \
VALDEZ HAND LAUNDRY?Flan- ; ?
nels a specialy. Goldstein Cabin, No. ! t
2. Mrs. H. Sharts and Dan Barlow.? v
l-io-tf. r
Well ventilated rooms and board at
the St. George House, formerly the
Simpson hospital. 10-3-tf
i
The Proper Time is Childhood
Many evil results come from a neglect of
children* eye* at an early reboot age.
When taken in time it i* often unnee**aary
to wear Kinase* long.
We do not recommend glasses if not needed.
fAoL- 7/<*na<Ux*i
fotnefaisl ant/ ct'ari
'i
J. F. ELFSTROM
Watchmaker
and Jeweler
i
With W. H. Case. All work guaranteed
U "" r
A. Benson sbpr^s ;;
Stand at Wills' Grocery Store ' '
r , 1 Phone* or 3-8-6 , ,
5 - ? ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED ? ?
r iiuiiiiiimi iiiinnmi
rll I I II I 1*1 11 l-Hl I-M-l -1 'I'M' l-t
::DR. H. YANCEi!
r ?? The
? ;; osteopath;;
h l Room* 5 and 6 Malony Bldfl.
0 ?? Consultation and Examination -?
h I! Free. Phone 262. "
I! Graduate American School of 1!
* ?jj Osteopathy, Klrkavllle, Mo.
0 ? ? Seven years' active practice.
Office hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 5 ..
r p. m.t or by appointment. "
0 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 I I
GLASSES FOR EVERY AGE 9
are procurable hero. For tho young- < >
stor who 1b a little weak In vlslop, <
for the parents whose eyes need J J
help, for the old folks whose sight <'
begins to show tho effect of ad- < >
vnnclng years. Come or bring tho JI
member whose eyes need assist-^
ance. < ?
I I CMARICKjj
. ^ Jeweler and ' >
J* Optician
i >
Phone 3-8-8 Strictly First Class
Juneau Construction Co.
CONTRACTORS
Store and office fixtures. Mission
Furniture. Planing Mill. Wood
Turning. Band Sawing.
Juneau, Alaska
11111111 111111111111IIII
The Alaska Grill ii
The Beit Appointed 1 ?
Place in Town j j
Best of Everything Served !!
at Moderate Prices
11111111111 i 11 ii 111111 n i
????????????????????????' >
THE BEST LOAF OF
BREAD
nzmzzzzzzzzzz?
it sold At ::
< *
San Francisco Bakery ii
G. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop. JI
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Sketches Free
Office, Room 7, Gnrside Block
Juneau, Alaska.
<?
< ?
i >
(?
< ?
McCloskeys |
<>
i >
<>
i >
< >
* ?
III111111II1111111111111 >
HAPPY HOME ::
CANNED GOODS ::
Highest Grade
Fruits and
Vegetables ; ?
Sold by all the
best grocers
Schwabacher Bros. & Co., Inc ?;
OAK OLSON, Representative j
Juneau ;;
m i: 1111111111111111111-!
CANADIAN PACIFIC RA
SaflinK from Juneau for Tort Simpson. Pri
Victoria i
PRINCESS MAQUINNA
Orphcum OuUdljjc C. P. R. TIC
Professional Cards
J. B. MARSHALL
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
REAGAN & REED
Attorneys-At-Law
4
15 Malony Bldg., Juneau .
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Robertson
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Oeoker Building *
Juneau .... Alaska 4
* A. H. HUMPHERIES
GENERAL TRANSFER
Heavy Hauling a Specialty
Phones?Office 258, Barns 226
Office, Valentine Bldg.
+ ??*
B. D. STEWART
MINING ENGINEER
U. S. MINERAL SURVEYOR
P. O. Box 168 ?? - Juneau
4
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and
SHEET METAL WORKS
121 Front St Phone 358
I ? *
.
I 4, +
Shampooing, Manicuring
and Facial Massage
at Your Home by Appointment.
MISS P. WAGONER, Phone 2322
:* +
+ MARSHALL & NEWMAN * <!
Plumbing, Heating and
Sheet Metal Works
JOBBING A SPECIALTY <
Phone 373; 139 Franklin, Cor 3rd. 3
4 4 <
<
+ + ;
A. J. PALMER, M.D. 3
Physician and Surgeon <
Phone 18, Sans Soucl Bldg. <
Douglas - - - - Alaska 3
4 4 <
i <
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO. ?
United 8tates Mall Steamer J
S. S. GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Hoo
nab, Gypsum, Tenakee, Killisnoo,
Chatham and Sitka, 2 a. m. Oct.
1, 7. 13, 19, 25, 31; Nov. 6, 12,
18, 24. 30; Dec. 6, 12, 18. 24, 30;
Jan. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29; Feb. 4, 10,
16. 22. 28; March 6, 12, 18, 24,
and 30.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee and
Baranoff Warm Springs, 2 a. m. j
Oct 25, Nov. 24, Dec. 24, Jan. 1
23, Feb. 22, and March 24.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Har
bor, Eagle River, Yankee Cove,
Sentinel Light Sto. Eldrid Light
Sta., Comet, Haines, Skagway, 2 J
a. m. Oct 5, 11, 17, 23, 29; Nov.
4. 10. 16, 22, 28; Oct 4. 10, 16,
22, 28; Jan. 3, 9. 15, 21, 27; Feb. |
2, 8, 14, 20, 26; March 4, 10, 16.
22, and 28. j
Returning, Leaves Skagway the
Following Day at 2 a. m.
, WILLIS K. NOWELL, MANAGER ;
ILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastServicc
ncc Rupert, Swanaon. Alert Bay. Vancouver ?
and Seattle
JAN. 8?23, FEB. 5 ;
KET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT, A*t
?
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Alaska Flyer : S. S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer
SAILS FROM SEATTLE FEBRUARY 18
ARRIVES IN JUNEAU FEBRUARY 22
SAILS SOUTH, from Juneau FEBRUARY 23
OOCK8 AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ottlce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
? ? 11 ' ? ' ' ? i t i ?? i 1.1 i ?.1,1 i r i i ,t i ,t ,t i i i i, I, t ,| I 1 I I I I I 1 I I I I I
ALASKA I
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
r Safety. Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle; Taeoens. Victoria and Vancouver. Through +
tkkoU to San Francisco
| MARIPOSA, North FEB. 2, 23. .SOUTH FEB. 9, MAR. 2 ::
? JEFFERSON, North FEB. 9, 19. .South FEB. 9, FEB. 19 -
; NORTHWESTERN, Southbound FEBRUARY 20 ??
; Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Aflt
I I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 I It II I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I III I I I I 1 I I 111 M I 11 III IN
h IA nT LI I A A11\ ALLEN SHATTUCK,
IN U KI n LAIN U
Steamship Company j?hn hens0N
* * * Douglas Agent
REGULAR FAST 8ERVICE BETWEEN SEATTLE AND JUNEAU
S. S. AL-KI, Southbound FEBRUARY 19
n* ? G 1.1.1 First Class $19.00
rare to Seattle second ciass $12.00
Pacific Alaska Navigation Company
ALASKA PACIFIC STEAM- ALASKA COA8T CO.
" " 4 ? J A lnalrn DahIa
SHIP CO. j<
Puget Sound-California Routo/j?,
Scuttle-San Francisco, con-ffl
ncctlng with S.S. Yale and^
S.S. Harvard for Southern
rollfnrniji Pnrtfi.
I'UgCl DOUUU-Aiaono
i from Tacoma and Seattle for
N Ketchikan, Petersburg. Ju
[) neau, Douglas, Treadwell, Ya
[ kutat, Katalla, Cordova, Val
dez, Ellamar, Port Wells, La
louche, Seward, Cook Inlet
Dolnts and Kodlak.
Saillngi from ) ADMIRAL EVANS, We?t FEB. 20
JUNEAU) ADMIRAL SAMPSON, South FEB. 17
Right reserved to change sailing d ates without notice.
S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agent
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 31
SEATTLE, TACOMA,
Victoria Vancouver, Belllngham, Everett, Olympla, Port Townsend, ' j
South Belllngham, Eureka, 8anta Barbara, Mexico, 8an Francisco, < >
Anacortes, Los Angeles and 8an Olego. 3 3
C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. H. Brandt, G. A. P. D 3!
112 Market 8treet, San Francisco. 113 James 8treeL Seattle ,,
c c cpnifAWF North Feb. 8, 19, and Mar. 2. |[
orUAAINE. South Feb 9( 2Q and Mar 3
Right Reserved to Change Schedule. 8. HOWARD EWING, Local AgL J
FERRY TIME 8CHEDULE STARTING JAN. 14, 1914.
Boat I.vit. Juneau
for Douirla* and
Trwulwcll
6:30 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. ni.
5:00 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
?9:30 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Leaves Trend well
for Douiclas and
Juneau
7:10 a. m.
8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
11:25 a. m.
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
5:40 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:55 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leave* DoukUu
For Juneau
7:15 a. m.
8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
11:30 a. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:45 p. m.
7:00 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
10:00 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
SHEEP CREEK TRIPS
Lv*. Sheep Creek
for Tread well,
Douglas Juneau
7:00 a. m.
1:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
Lvs. Juneau for
Sheep Creek
6:30 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
5:00 p. m.
Leave* Douglas
for Sheep Creek
6:45 a. m.
1:15 p. m.
5:15 p. m.
Lv*. Treadwoll
for Sheep Creek
6:50 a. m.
1:20 p. m.
5:20 p. m.
On Saturday and Wednesday nights II p. m. trip will go to Sheep Creek. Leaving Tread well for Juneau
at 11:40 p.m. Leaving Douglas for Juneau at 11:45 p. m.
IIII11111111 11111111
THE WHITE PASS & YUKON ROUTE
THE KOUTE OF COMFORT, SPEED, SERVICE, SAFETY . .
During tho winter season of 1913-14 our regular train service will bo maintained North and < >
South bound betweenSkaguay and white Hone, every Tueaday and Friday. < ?
WINTER 8TAGE 8ERVICE J |
betwoen White Horse and Dawson will bo in regular operation, affording our patrons the < >
maximum of Comfort and Safety. i >
Tho White Pass & Yukon Route will maintain an efficient freight and passenger stage ser- , ,
vice from White Horse. Yukon Territory, via Lake Kluane, to the , ,
CHISANA GOLD FIELD8
Tnla is tho only sale and sano route to the new diggings, and we will gladly answer all in- , ,
qulries. Wo will also oprrato a freight service up tho White River, and carry a full line of , ,
groceries and food at mouth of White River, Those supplies can bo obtained by pros pec ton , ,
at reasonable prices. For full information apply to , ,
J. E. Dempsey, Traffic Manager, 612 Second Ave., Seattle, Wash. ? >
H. Wheeler. Supt, Mail Service Dept. White Horse, Y. T < '
?i I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ill I I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 111111II11 HI '
The Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx
CLOTHING
Suits from &15.oo to SSO.oo
Alaska-T readwell
Gold Mining Go.
Treadwell
Alaska
- L

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