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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 18, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 386. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 18, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
EXPECT HOUSE TO VOTE ON RAILROAD BILL TODAY
? ? ? . ?tr: ? j ??-?
City Council Gives
Account of Stewardship
The Juneau city council has caused I
to be prepared and today issues a re
port covering in detail the financial con-:
dition of the City of Juneau and the
record of the transactions that have
occurred during the incumbency of the1
present administration. The council
has also issued a statement .explana
tory of the report, which sets forth
the reasous which have actuated the
council in all that it has done.
It is the purpose of the council in
the near future to hold a public meet
ing. which all of the citizens of Ju
neau are invited to attend, and at that
time the city administration will be
glad to answer all questions regarding
any items in the accounts, or with re
spect to the administration of the city's
affairs in any particular.
Council's Statement.
The city council's statement follows:
"What we desire is that every trans
action of the administration which
may not be clearly understood, be
made as plain to any citizen, seeking
information as is possible. While, as
in all human undertakings, we have
no doubt fallen short of the highest
possible efficiency, and may in some
respects be subject to criticism for
our acts, we are conscious of having
acted with the sole purpose of accom
plishing the greatest good for the peo
ple of Juneau, and we do not shrink
from any ju^ criticism.
"We add here some comments re-1
garding certain of our expenditures,
not with the hope that they will meet
with universal approval, but merely
to explain our motives. No doubt
some readers will conclude that we
have placed the most favorable con
struction upon what wo have done, but
we believe that such construction is
neither more nor less than fair.
New City Hall.
The building of the new city hall
has been fully justified. The building
furnishes school facilities to 9S pupils.
There was no suitable building nor,
in fact, was there a building of any
kind available where these children
might have been housed and instruct
ed. Even with the increased accom
modations in the city hall, the old
school building is still overcrowded.
We were confronted with the necessity
of building the city hall or building a
cheap structure (discreditable to a
prosperous and progressive com
munity) on the school house block.
A building which would have accom
modated the same number of pupils
as now receive instruction in the city
hall, and having equal floor space,
would have cost not less than $5,000,
even if constructed in the cheapest
possible manner, and if so constructed
it would be necessary to remove it in
a few years, and it would not have
been a permanent addition to the city
improvements. The practical effect of
putting the money into the city hall has
been to decrease the cost of that
building by $5,000, and the money so
expended is a permanent asset of the
city. When the second floor of the
city hall is no longer needed for
school purposes, it is planned to de
vote a part of it to a dormitory and
-l,,k momKaeo r\f tho firo I
CiUU ruviuo tUl Uicuiuvio w? kuv M.v
department, and the remaining part to
a city library and reading room. A
representative of the Federal govern
ment has made inquiries of the city
looking towards leasing the second
floor of the city hall for certain of Its
departments, and a handsome revenue
could be obtained from this source, but
if the space were not required for
school purposes we believe that the ef
ficiency of the Are department and the
general welfare of the city would be
better subserved by using the space
as above outlined rather than convert
ing it into a source of revenue in dol
lars and cents.
The total cost of the city hall. $26.
070.38. including the cement sidewalk
around the lot. is proportionately less
than any building of similar character
in the City of Juneau.
School House Site.
As is generally known, it was the
Intention of the School Board to raise
funds to construct a new school build
ing on the present school block, based
upon a guarantee by the citizens of
Juneau to be taken care of afterwards
by bond issue whenever the authority
(Continued on Page Three.)
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?60.
Minimum?28.
Clear.
LAUNCH UNION IS
LOST WITH CREW
There is little doubt but that the
gas boab Union, plying out of Lituya
Bay Is lost, and. if true, William Ger
main. owner of the craft, and Strat
ton who helped him run the boat, per
ished with the wreck. The Union left
Lituya Bay 35 daya ago for Dixon Har
bor. which is only a 5-hour run. She
did not show up at Dixon Harbor
nor has she been seeu leaving Lituya
Bay, although relief and searching par
ties have scoured the country looking
for the missing boat and men. Short
ly after the Union left Lituya Bay a
storm came up and it is almost a cer
tainty that the boat never escaped. The
Union was a good sea boat, 35 feet
long, and formerly was on the Haines
Skagway mall run.
News confirming the disaster was
brought to Juneau by Sid Hooper and
A. A. Gabbs, of the mail boat Fox
who arrived with the Fox from Lituya
Bay at five o'clock this morning. The
men who lost their lives with the
Union are well known in Juneau.
The Fox made the trip to Lituya
to take a large prospecting party to
that section, making the round trip in
four days.
.Malcolm and Jack Campbell are at
Lituya Bay, but expect to leave for Ju
neau within the next three days.
DEMOCRATS WILL
CELEBRATE MAR. 4
'me Juneau Democratic Club held
a special meeting in Gross hall last
night for the purpose of making ar
rangements for the smoker that is to
be held on March 4, in honor of the
first aniversary of the inauguration of
President Woodrow Wilson. It was
a very successful meeting, one of the
most enthusiastic gatherings since the
organization of the club. The main
object of the meeting was placing the
entire management of the smoker in
the hands of the executive board. The
funds necessary were raised at the
meeting by contributions.
After disposing of this matter a dis
cussion on the disposition of Alaska's
insane patients took up considerable
time. Resolutions were passed plac
ing the club on record as favoring the
establishing of a permanent hospital
for the insane in Alaska. Dr. De
Vighne is chairman of a committee
appointed to forward a copy of the
resolution and bring it properly before
the department before the new con
tract is made with institutions in the
States for the care of Alaska's in
sane.
FIRE LADDIES PULL
OFF GREAT SMOKER
The Are bell rang last night, but
there wasn't any Ore except in the
bosoms of the Are laddies who had
gathered at headquarters for a good
time. The bell was used to call the
; boys in, and they gathered to the num
ber of half a hundred or more.
It was one of the most successful
smokers ever held since the depart
ment was organized. The Juneau or
chestra was in attendance and furn
ished excellent music for the occasion.
There was singing and story telling
and plenty to eat and smoke. George
Lovegrove. talented monologue artr
1st, added much to the enjoyment of
the evening by his work.
THANE PLEASED WITH
CHANGED WEATHER
General Manager B. L. Thane, who
visited Sheep creek yesterday In com
pany with \V. DeLong head of the pur
chasing department of the Alaska Gas
tineau Mining company, reports that
everything in that division is moving
along fine.
"If this sort of weather continues,"
said Mr. Thane, "we will soon have
power enough to Increase the work
ing force at both Sheep creek and Per
severance."
ROYAL FRUIT CO.
Phone 280.
has a large shipment on the Northwest
ern, including butter, eggs and prod
uce, also a line of fine glace fruits.
Our eggs are the finest on the mar
kct. Our customers are our best
advertisers. Ask them about our eggs
Free delivery. 2-14-tl
FEDERAL OFFICERS
CLOSE BAWDY HOUSES
District Atorney John Rustgnrd to
day gave instruction to Marshal H. L.
Faulkner to close every bawdy houso
on both sides of Gastlneau channel.
Marshal Faulkner says that every oc
cupant of such places will be notified
tonight to cease their unlawful prac^
tlces immediately, and that tho or
ders of the district atorney's office
with which he heartily concurs shall
be rigidly enforced.
Speaking of the indictments for
which prosecutions hnve been under
way in relation to this matter Mr.
Rustgard said: "I will ask the court
to impose a substantial sentence by
way of fine In one case against George
Rice and that sentence bo suspended
In the other three for a definite per
iod."
"I am not going to ask for a sen
tence of imprisonment in the present
cases because defendants have been
invited to conduct the resorts com
plained of and have been misled Into
the belief that they would be tolerat
ed. In any case that comes up here
after, however, I shall insist upon a
jail sentence as well as a fine?and I
want that distinctly understood.
"The marshal's office Is thoroughly
in sympathy with me in this matter
and we expect to stay on the trail of
thcso offenders until they are out ofj
the country.
"My policy nas aiways ueeu iu ic??c
all matters of this kind to the munici
pal authorities, primarily, because I
believe that the Federal authorities
ought, for the sake of harmohy, to
stay out of the affairs oyer which mu
nicipalities have Jurisdiction, and sec
ondarily. because the municipal au
thorities have much better facilities
for properly handling matters of this
kind.
"In dealing with the social evil my
office has the choice between only two
courses: either to eradicate the cribs,
or leave them alone. They have
caused such a stench in the commun
ity, brought ruin to so many young
men, wrecked so many homes, and
drawn to the city such a large crim
inal class that, the time seems ripe
for the Federal authorities to step in
and enforce the law.
"The red light district might be
minimized by proper discipline. This
could be done by municipal authorities
chasing a woman out of the country
if: first, she supports or entertains
a maquerau, second, if there is rea
son to believe she serves intoxicating
liquors, third, if she alolws anybody
about the premises who is not of ma
ture age or who is intoxicated, fourth,
! If there Is ever a complaint that any
body is robbed in her place, fifth. If
she solicits busines or insists upon as
sociating with respectable people in
public places.
"Of course, to enforce regulations
of this kind successful}- requires mu
nicipal officers of probity and high
intelligence and with plenty of deter
mination and firmness of character,
and such other qualities as distinguish
successful executive officers. It is ev
ident that the Federal officials cannot
go into any such cleansing process."
JUNEAU TEAM PLAYS
MEXICAN MINE TEAM
The Juneau Athletic Club basketball
team will meet the Mexican Mine team
Friday night at the Treadwell club.
A large crowd of rooters will proba
bly attend from Juneau. The Mex
ican mine team holds the champion
ship among the Treadwell teams.
CAPTAIN MALCOM
SERVANT OF CUPID
A quiet wedding occurred at Lituya
Bay a few days ago. Louis James
Green and Edna Lituya' were the con
tracting parties. In the absence of a
minister they put out to sea and board
ing the Chlopeck, prevailed upon Capt.
Jack Campbell to perform the cere
mony. Not possessing a Bible, Capt.
Campbell decoriously took his tide
book from the shelf and made it serve
in tieing the nuptial knot.
NOTICE
Owing to extended demands for our
rubber goods we have decided to con
> tinue the sale several days longer,
? with the same discount of 25%.
JUNEAU DRUG CO.
2-17-tf Opposite Alaskan Hotel.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
Fresh ranch eggs by the dozen or
? case.
Burbanks potatoes?the best?by the
pound, sack or ton.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
Have some fun! Tickle the Ivories
f at Burford's. 2-16-tf.
Seattle Nominates
Trenholme and Gill
SEATTLE, Feb. 18?The total vote
cast for Mayor in yesterday's primar
ies was 61,667. The vote for the throe
leading candidates was as follows:
Gill \,... 23.419
Trenholuie 11,862
Winsor 11,613
Six other candidates divided 14,869
votes. About 13,000 of the registered
voters did not go to the polls. It Is
estimated that 10,000 voters will reg
ister before the election in March.
Gill received 38 per cent, of the votes
cast.
Early Returns Indicate Trend.
SEATTLE, Feb. 18.?'Incomplete re
turns from Seattle'^ primary., election
yesterday leave no doubt about the
nomination of former Mayor Hiram C.
Gill and J. D. Trenholme for the office
of Mayor. The Indications are that
Gill has received about 23,000 votes
and J. D. Trenholme 12,000. Richard
Winsor, Socialist, is running a close (
third. The other candidates aro far 1
in the roar with Austin E. Griffiths (
leading.
Of the votes counted, GUI has re- 1
celved nearly 40 per cent, of the total 1
least. -In order to defeat him In the 1
J general election, Trenholmo will have ;
to receive from 75 to 80 per cent of
those that voted for other candidates
in the primary yesterday and a major- '
ity of the voters that did not partici- '
, pate in the primaries.
CIVIL CALENDAR
H S RIGHT Of WAY
Judg W. JennlngB of Jhe district
court 1 ~ a clcan-up of the criminal
calendar tnls morning by continuing
over all matters that have not come to
issue. The civil calendar was taken
up nt 2 o'clock this afternoon and cases
Bet
Kitty Change* Her Mind. / i
Kitty Brown, Indicted for selling
liquor without a license, changed her
plea of not guilty to guilty and will
be sentenced this afternoon at 4:30.
George L. Rice also changed hTs plea
of not guilty to guilty and will be sen
tenced at the same time. Chris. Bro
vlck, convicted of selling liquor to In
dians, will also be sentenced at this
time. 1
Forfeits Bond
Pedro Pett, out under cash bond of
$50 and Indicted for Belling liquor to
Indians, was called and not answering
the bond declared forfeited.
Wilbur Bulger Arrested.
Wilbur Bulger was arrested by the
marshal's offlco on complaint of J. H.
Mnloney for pointing a lire arm at com
plainant.
Sues Vanderbilt.
Charles Goldstein this morning died
suit against Jom W. Vanderbilt to re
cover alleged Indebtedness to the
amount of $173.84 for goods sold.
FIRE DESTROYS A
VANDERBILT HOME
JERICO. L. I., Feb. 18.?The country
home of Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt.
Jr., was destroyed by fire last night.
The loss Is placed at $1,000,000.
PRESIDENT ENTERTAINS
FOR SPEAKER CLARK
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18.?President
Woodrow Wilson gave a State dinner
last night at the White House in hon
or of Speaker Champ Clark.
EARTHQUAKE SHAKES
UP NEVADA CITY
RENO. Nov., Feb. 18. ? An earth
quake at 10:18 o'clock this morning
shook this city. Windows were brok
en and many walls cracked.
OTTO PRAGER POSTMASTER
OF WASHINGTON CITY
?+?1
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18. ? Otto
Praeger was today nominated for post
master of Washington City.
W. B. HOGGATT ENTERING
ALASKA FIELD AGAIN
The Jualin Alaska Mines Co. filed
articles of incorporation with Secre
tary Chrales E. Davidson today. W.
B. Hoggatt, former Governer of Alas
ka, but now of New York, is president
and J. F. Kirk is secretary of the cor
poration. the home of which Is named
as New York City. The capital stock
Is placed at $2,000,000.
LIGHTING FERRY WAY.
Linemen today and yesterday were
actively at work'stringing lights along
Ferry Way (Hooligan Alley) from the
erry float to Lower Front street. When
the juice is turned .on tonight It Is
expected that the thoroughfare will be
es white as Broadway.
i. ...
PRESH SEALSHTPT oysters at
Col'tptolT?'?. 10-9-tf.
When hungry, hit the trail for the
stampede, corner Front and Franklin.
2-12-tf.
JURY CONVICTS i
'FRISCO FUEL MEN;
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 18.?Super- J
intendent F. C. Mills, Vice-President ]
James B. Smith and Weigher E. H. ,
Mayer, of the WeBtern Fuel company, .
were found guilty by a jury last night ,
of defrauding the government of cub- (
toms duties on coal. ]
NEW YORK BRICKLAYERS i
GET INCREASED WAGES j]
NEW YORK, Feb. 18.?About 12,000
bricklayers of New York City have
eon granted an advance In wages from (
$5.60 to $6 a day. (
More Work for Railroad Men. (
WILMINGTON, Del., Feb. 18?Two ,
thousand employees at the Pennsyl
vania railroad shops at this place, who
have been working on reduced time '
for several months, have resumed full
time.
~
!
LLOYDS REDUCE I
SOUTH POLE RATES i
LONDON, Feb. 18.?Lloyds is Insur- ,
ing all Sir Ernest Shackleton's con- ,
tracts for South Polo expedition at 10 j
per cent premium. For the previous \
expedition the rate was 50 per cent.
AIR MEN MAY
RACE ROUND WORLD
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 18. ? The ,
Aero Club of America has given its ,
sanction to an aeroplane race around ]
the world, to be started from San ?
Francisco in May, 1915. The first prize
will be $100,000.
? ? ?
?FRISCO PAINTER KILLS
HIMSELF AND WIFE
? (
? " ? * - ? I
SEATTLE, Fob. 18,?The Admiral j
Evans sailed on her first Alaska trip:
last night. Among her passengers for
Juneau is George McCarthy, who will
be agent at that place for the Pacific
Alaska Navigation Co. Ho is accom
panied by Mrs. McCarthy.
The following aro the Juneau pas
sengers: H. Elsler, T. F. Kennedy, J.
F. Mullen, Geo. McCarthy and wife,
E. Nelson, T. M. Lambert, Geo. Bunt
ing, Miss Rose $elander, Geo. Moore,
Walter Nelson, Tom Merry, O. Drange,
Robt. Jackson, E. T. Wallen and eight
steerage.
ADMIRAL EVANS STARTS
FIRST ALASKA TRIP
SAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 18.?Hen
ning Willing, a painter in this city,
last night killed his wife and then
took his own life. A six-year-old son
notified the police of the tragedy.
SPECIAL MEETING.
There will bo a special meeting of
the'Juneau Commercial Club in the
council chambers Thursday evening,
February 19, at 8 o'clock, to consider
question of appropriation of Alaska ex
hibit in Panama-Pacific Exposition.
2-16-31. JOHN RECK. Pros.
BIG MASQUERADE FEB. 19.
Don't make any engagement that will
keep you away from tho Athletic Club
Masquerade Ball on Thursday evening.
Feb. 19, at Elks' hall.
A late ferry has been arranged for
to take tho people living in Douglas,
Treadwell and Sheep creek home af
ter the dance.
The Juneau Athletic Club gives
dances every Thursday evening. 2-16-4t
PERCY ROCHESTER
COMMITS SUICIDE
PORTLAND, Ore., Fob. 18.?Percy
W. Rochester, a dealer In cement and
sther building material in this city,
ind a pioneer of Seattle, was found
lead in his office last night, a suicide.
Mr. Rochester was widely known on
Lho Pacific Coast and was a prominent
Christian Scientist. Deceased was a
native of Kentucky and about fifty
rears of age.
Percy Rochester was a pioneer real
estate dealer of Seattle, and accummu
lated a fortune during the first
joom that took place there immedlate
y following the fire. He also was
jromlnent in politics, and was a mem
ner of the famous "Kid Committee,"
svhich contributed so largely to the
election of Judge James T. Ronald to
:he mayorality in 1892. He was a
jrother of the late Junius Rochester,
'or many years law partner of James
Hamilton Lewis and L. C. Gilman, and
>f G. A. Rochester, now a leading Se
>.ttle lawyer. He was prominent in
society, club life, and civic affairs all
:he time that he lived in Seattle. He
las resided in Portland for about three
rears. His friends were legion.
LOW TARIFF BRINGS
IN FOREIGN BUTTER;
WASHINGTON, Fob. 18.?Tariff re
luction has led to large importations
>f butter into the American markets.
The imports in Juanary reached 210,
)00 pounds at New York, a record flg
ire. ?
GOVERNMENT GETTING
FARM MONEY BACK
WASHINGTON, Feb. 17.?To dato
>16,000,000 of the $40,000,000 crop-mov
ing funds originally deposited last au
lumn in banks of agricultural sections
ias been returned. Several large Chi
sago banks, instead of waiting for
leflnite dates on which funds were to
be returned, are voluntarily returning
them in advance.
ROCKHILL MAY GET
RUSSIAN MISSION
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18,?It is Bald
that the President is considering the
appointment of William Rockhill, for
merly minister to China, ambassador
to Russia. It is conceded that an ex
perienced diplomat is required at St.
Petersburg. Two Democrats, Henry
M. Pindell, of Peoria, and Charles R.
Crane, of Chicago, have refused the
appointment. Rockhill is a Republi
can.
EASTBOUND RATES
ARE TO BE CUT
BOSTON, Feb. 18.?The Hamburg
American Line will cut the steerage
rate between Boston and Europe from
$27.50 to $22, os the latest move in the
trans-Atlantic rate war.
BALKAN NATIVES
MAY FIGHT AGAIN
?+?
NEW YORK, Feb. 18.?A Berlin ca
ble to the New York Times says the
German government has intimated to
M. VenlzeloB, Greek premier, that an
other war with Turkey is inevitable
unless ways are found of gratifying
Turkey's demand for a more equitable
settlement of the Balkan situation.
MOVEMENT FOR
SAFETY AT SEA
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.?The De
partment of Commerce will probably
make efforts to have an international
law adopted requiring steamships to
come to a full stop and remain stopped
until moving objects can be clearly dis
tinguished within an eighth of a mile.
MANUEL RELEASES
CLAIMS ON THRONE
LONDON, Feb. 18.?Ex-King Manu
el of Portugal has lost the $50,000 a
year income which he has been re
ceiving from the private purse of King
George of England, and he has re
nounced his claim to the Portuguese
throne in favor of Braganzas.
Whether you like Havana or domes
| tic cigars, you can get the kind you
like at Burford's. 2-16-tf
House Geminates Bond
Feature of Alaska Bill
Washnigton, Feb. 18. ? In the
committee of the whole House this
afternoon, by a vote of 88 to 87,
an amendment offered by Repre
sentative John J. Fitzgerald, of
New York, chairman of the appro
priations committee, eliminating
the $40,000,000 bond Issue provis
ion of the Senate Alaska railroad
bill was adopted, and a provision
Inserted providing that the rail
road shall not cost to exceed $35,
000,000 and appropriating $10,000,
000 to start the work. Fitzgerald
contended that the road should be
built from current revenues of the
government, and that the bonded
Indebtedness of the Nation should
not be Increased.
An effort will be made by the
supporters of the bill to have the
bond feature re-Instated. The vote
was so close on the amendment
that they are hopeful that they will
be able to accomplish it, but they
refuse to make predictions on the
point
Bill Will Pass Today.
The friends of the measure still con
tend that it will pass the House be
fore adjournment today, though at 5
o'clock it has not been disposed of.
With the bill adopted, It Is believed
that the Senate will insist upon the
retention of the $40,000,000 bond pro
vision, and it is thought the House will
consent in the end.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.?Detailed
consideration of the Alaska railroad
bill was resumed in the House of Rep
resentatives today with the administra
tion leaders confident that a final vote
is near at hand. The general debate
on the measure has closed, and amend
ments are being considered under the
five-minute rule.
Only one change has been made in
the Senate bill. This empowers the
President either to lease the road after
it is built or to have it operated by the
government.
President Again Comes to Front.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18?President
Woodrow Wilson today told Represen
tative Oscar W. Underwood, majority
floor leader in the House, that he
could be assured that the administra
tion supports the Alaska rairoad bill,
and that it desires early action.
JOHN ZUG IS
DANGEROUSLY HURT
SEATTLE, Feb. 18?John Zug, of
Fairbanks, government engineer for
the Alaska road commission and in
charge of its work in the Tanana val
ley, was run down and dangerously in
jured last night by an unknown auto
ist
CASTILLO IS
CAPTURED AGAIN
EL PASO, Tex., Fob. 18.?Castillo,
the bandit responsible for the Cum
bre tunnel massacre, who was report
ed having been executed with six of
his followers by Constitutionalist cav
] airy, was captured by American troops
I yesterday near Hatchita, New Mexico.
He was accompanied by six followers
! when captured. They will be brought
i here.
Castillo Puzzles Government.
! WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.?Three of
j the Executive Departments arc search
ing for precedents to guide the United
States in its treatment of the bandit
Castillo who was captured yesterday
in New Mexico.
Diaz Coming to New York.
HAVANA, Feb. 18.?Gen. Felix Di
az sailed today for New York.
Japan Not Supplying Arms.
NEW YORK. Feb. 18. ?Japanese
Prime Minister Yamamoto, replying to
a Now York Sun cable, states that Jap
an is not aiding the Huerta government
by supplying arms, but that a contract
for arms was made last June with a
Japanese private firm. He says that
no delivery has yet been made on that
contract. The United States govern
ment Is said to understand that one
delivery has already been made and
that another will be made during Feb
ruary.

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