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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 28, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
. _
VOL. HL, NO. 394. JUNEAU^ ALASKA, SATURDAY, FEB. 28, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Mutual Concessions Bring
Conferees Work to Close
?? -
WASHINGTON*. Feb. 28. ? The
House conferees have receded from
the amendment adopted by the House
to the Senate Alaska railroad bill
which requires the President to pur
chase any connecting line desired be
fore work on the new railroad system
shall begin.
Previously the Senate conferees
agreed to eliminate the bond issue
provision of the Senate bill and reduce
the appropriation to $35,000,000. This
was the real stumbling block and the
amendment that kept the conferees
apart. The change now accepted and
made a part of the bill as previously
agreed upon was made by the House
when it adopted the Fitzgerald amend
ment by a vote of SS to 87.
The House made the first conces
sion when It agreed to leave all mat
ters with reference to the guage of
the railroad to the President.
The adjustment of the differences
over the manner of providing the
funds practicaly ended all the differ
ences between the conferees. As the
bill now stands appropriations for the
railroad must be made annually until
the road shall havo been completed.
There will be a final meeting of the
conferees Monday. The bill will then
go to the Senate and House for final
action.
JUNEAU DEMOCRATS
PLAN BIG TIME
The Juneau Democratic Club has
bought the Grand theatre from W. D.:
Gross for Wednesday evening. Mar.
4, with the privilege of taking posses
sion after 9 o'clock. Here it is
planned to hold the big smoker and
jollification in honor of the anniver-'
sary of the inauguration of President,
Woodrow Wilson. The executive board
of the club met in the offices of Ep- ?
steyn. Gilmour & Co. last night and i
arranged a tentative program that will
be completed in detail next Monday, i
It has been decided that Thomas'
Cole is to be master of ceremonies |
and there will be plenty of entertain-!'
ment. There will be short addresses 1
by Gov. J. F. A. Strong. J. A. Hellen
thal and J. B. Marshall. There will be 1
instrumental music and singing, a !
wrestling match between Joe Fischer;
and an unknown giant from Douglas
island. George Lovegrove, talented
entertainer and other volunteers will
be on hand. There will also be mov
ing pictures and pipes. Father and i
brother and fellow Democrats are as
surred a good time.
THE ORPHEUM HOTEL
CHANGES MANAGEMENT
John T. Spickett announces that the
Orpheum hotel has been leased to Mrs.
Mary Van Geer, formerly of Porcupine.
Ontario. Mrs. Van Geer comes well 1
recommended as a woman thoroughly ;
familiar with the hotel business and
will conduct the Orpheum as a first
class place in which to stay.
The Orpheum Is a new hotel, steam
heated and with hot and cold water
In all the rooms. It has been popular;
ever since it was opened by Mr. Spick
ett less than a year ago.
EXCELLENT PROGRAM TONIGHT
AND SUNOAY AT GRAND
The photo plays at our theatre are
very good tonight and Sunday, as fol
lows:
"King Baggott in a Strange Case."
very Interesting, an Imp drama.
"The Mother's Son." a picture you
all should see. very touching play.
"Indian Isnmael." a good "101 Bis
on" drama, the kind that always
pleases.
"Mister Fixer." and The Rivals" are
the laughable Keystone comedies.
Come to the Grand, always good pic
tures.
SEWARD-IDITAROD TRAIL
IN GOOD CONDITION
The Seward-Iditarod trail is in good,
condition for travel, according to a
letter received from Albert Wile, who
left Juneau on the last trip of the
Admiral Evans.
Mr. Wile wrot from Seward and said
he was to leave for Iditarod Feb. 26.
The Bull Moose Chile Con Carne is
hard to beat, 15c. at 396 Front st
?2-26-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?37.
Minimum?2S.
Precipitation?.06.
Cloudy; snow and rain.
COMMERCIAL CLUB
ASKS EOR $200,000 j
j President John Iteck and Secretary |
Ike Sowerby of the Juneau Commer- (
cial Club arc busy signing a memorial |
to President Wilson and Congress for i
an oppropriation of $200,000 to be used <
for the collection and maintenance of t
an Alaska exhibit at the Panama-Pa
ciflc Exposition in San Francisco next (
year. <
A copy of the memorial is being (
sent to President Wilson, to members s
of the Cabinet, and to every member <
of the Senate and House of Represen- '
tativs, as well as to other persons in ^
the States. A copy of the memorial 1
with a resolution attached, asking the
people of Alaska to endorse the action \
of the Juneau Commercial Club, and t
join with them in the request to the t
end that Alska may be represented at 1
the great exposition, is also being sent a
to every commercial organization, 2
town and hamlet in Alaska, with the a
idea of getting concerted action.
The Juneau Commercial Club has a
taken on new life and energy within
the past few weeks and is preparing s
to carry on an aggressive campaign
in the interests of the Territory as a
whole and of Juneau and vicinity es- f
pecially. In line with this the flrut g
step will be getting new members and
securing the active interest of all tbe
old ones. Many who are connected 2
with new enterprise in the city are t
awaiting to be Invited to Join and be- 1
come a part of the civic force that p
makes for good in any community. f
? ? ? e
LEAVING ON THE " [
ADMIRAL EVANS t
The Admiral Evans, sailing for the
South last evening, took the following j r
passengers fror. Juneau: Mrs. Alice t
Xoblitt, N'eat Whyt. M. G. Rogers and e
wife. X S. Rogers. Margaret Rogers,
Julia Rogers, J. W. Douglas, I. Schoen- fi
feld. Mrs. Gath, A. C. Wilson, Miss
V'elver, E. P. Walker, W. H. Edwards,
Alta Dare, M. B. Flemming, H. B. Rob
erts. Mrs. F. W. Sisco. L. M. Forrest, fl
Chrissle Johnson, Helen James, Pete c
Kostch, O. S. Lee. P. C. Stoess, U. A. h
Gates, J. B. Turner, Hans Anderson, o
and G. A. Thayer. c
? ?? P
NOTHING NEW KNOWN il
OF NEW DIGGINGS ]<
?r
A letter rece ived by W. W. Casey t
from a former employee named John a
B. Smedley writing from Chatlnda, a
potsolllce in the Cishana section, says:
"There is nothing new here but the:
town is still growing. Little prospect- j
ing has been done although they are d
going out to the creeks now. There e
is nothing to warrant anyone in com- p
Ing here now as there is nothing do- c
Ing at all. The town has half a dozen i
stores, one saloon, two barber shops
and several bunk houses. Grub is 30
to 35 cents per pound. A postofflce
has been established and it is called t
Chatinda. Kettleson Is postmastor. d
There is nothing more known about I
the camp than there was six months c
ago. Pay has been found on the s
James, Whitman, and McClellan c
ground and that is absolutely ail.
There have been stampedes to various j
creeks but nothing came of them."
The letter Is dated January 27, 1914.
? ? ? (i
MASONIC MEETING 1
?*? 8
A called communication of Mt. Ju- c
neau Lodge. Xo. 147. F. & M. A. M? t
will be held Monday evening at eight t
o'clock at Odd Fellows' hall. Work In i
the E. A. degree. The craft cordially
invited. E. D. BEATTIE, Secy.
2-2S-2L
AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION!! j
You may save a doctor's bill by hav- i
ing a hot water bottle in the house.
We have a two-quart, pure gum rubber s
hot water bottle at $1.50. guaranteed
for two years, but which will probably I
last longer. Let us send you one.
Phone 250, JUNEAU DRUG CO. (
?2-27-tf.
? ? ? ,
OWLS. TAKE NOTICE. I
There will be an organization meet
ing of the Order of the Owls, held on
the first Sunday in March, at Gross <
hall, at 8 o'clock p. m. All members ]
of the order are requested to be pres- I
ent. OSCAR WALLEN.
?2-24-5t. Organizer, i
WANTED?Girl or woman for gen
eral work in small boarding house. In- <
quire Mrs. Hackett. 448 Front street, ]
Phone 223. 2-26-3L i
The Bull Moose has a free reading I
room in connection. 396 Front st. i
?2-26-tf. i
I ' I
JUNEAU HIGH WINS <
IROM SKAGWAY
-? -
JUNEAU 20
SKAGWAY 5 I
r
The Juneau high school baskotball ,
team defeated the White Pass Athletic
Club team of Skagway last night lit c
one of the fastest gaves witnessed 8
here. The game took on rnoro the 1
nature of football srimmago than is
customary to witness. The Juneau 8
lads are younger than their opponents ^
of last night but they aro a husky 1
bunch and fully as strong which, added
:o their excellent team work and ac- e
:uracy in makltig baskets, wOn them v
:ho game. n
For Juneau every man on the team
lid excellent work and it would be 9
lithcult to choose any one member as
leserving of special praise. The
same perhaps may truthfully be said
>f Skngway except that their team &
vork was not so pronounced and they a
vere not so accurate in shooting bas- "
cots. "
At the end of the first half the game ?
vas 11?2, with the home lads on c
he long end. The Skagway team, not
lismayed, went into the second half S
ike a bunch of wolves, but were uh
ible to hold their own, making but
: while Juneau added 9 more to their
icore. 81
- - - U
The line-ups or the two teams-were ??
is follows: n
Skagway? Bledsoe, Sparks, Kos- K
luth (Capt.), forwards: Rapuzzl, Mc- F
Kenzie, guards; Ask, center.
Juneau?Kashaveroff, Wilson, Bur- c
ord, forwards; McKinnon, Casey,
mards; Horner (Capt.), center.
Skagway at Douglas.
The Skagway team will play the R
Jexicnn team in the Douglas rink
onight and It promises to be a very
nteresting performance. It is ex
acted that a large crowd will attend j
rom Juneau. Under the clrcumstanc-1fI
s the game scheduled between the I tl
)ouglas and Juneau high school teams :111
o have been played In T?r.eau tonight tl
as been postponed. D
The Skagway lads wlh y and ar- 9'
ange another game with the Junenu "
earn for next Monday night in Ju- ''
leau. 8l
? ? ? si
kDMIRAL SAMPSON tC
LOAD TO TOKEEN
* . j si
Advices received at the local of-.-*'
ces of the Pacific Alaska Navigation ; ki
ompany are that the Admiral Samp- j fa
on went into Tokeen to leave a crew;
f 100 men, a lot of freight and ma
hinery for the marble works at that
ilace and that the hour of her arrival T
ti Juneau would be cabled later. The
seal office expects the Sampson to ar- 1?
ive tonight. The Sampson brings 100 ui
ons of freight for Juneau, also mail it
,nd passengers. if
? tt
DIVORCE SUIT FILED. hi
Harry Vanerman has filed suit for si
ivorce from his wife Rifka B. Van- ni
rman on statutory grounds. The cou
le were marriod, according to tlie hi
omplaint, in November, 1912. P<
? ? ? a
MARY E HART COMING NORTH ft
Mary E. Hart, who has been lec- at
urer on the Spokane for several yearB cl
luring the excursion season for the)J'
'aclflc Coast Steamship company, will, tl
ome North on the next trip of that'
teamer, according to information re- t<
:elved by her friends. w
? ? ? CI
I. P. ROGERS QUITS NORTH BANK tl
J. P. Rogers, for many years sup- b
rintendent of the Whito Pass and 7.1
Tukon Route railroad, but for the last It
everal years general superintendent
if the North Bank road between Spo- tl
:ane nnd Portland, has resigned, effee- a
Ivo March 1st. He was well known si
n Juneau. w
?-?--? li
ORPHEUM ATTRACTIONS 1 it
The program for tonight at the Or- a
theum theatre will consist of the fol-i p
owing four good photo plays: g
"When Soul Meets Soul," a fine Es- p
tanay, Egyptian dramatic production. 0
"A Mother's Strategy," a beautiful t
Aibln drama. a
"Steak and Onions," a good Selig p
'arce comedy. s
"Bill Mixes with His Relations," a a
?ood Essanay comedy, will complete F
:he program.
Sunday Night 0
The special Sunday night program t
will open with a regular Pathe Week- f
ly, containing an unusually good pic- f
ture series of the World's events. 1
"The Chase Across the Continent," a
Is a fine Edison drama with many r
eventful incidents.
"The Counterfeit Bill," Is a splen- a
lid Vitagraph, detective play in which r
Maurice Costello carries the leading t
role.
"Planting the Spring Garden," a J
first class comedy, with Hughie Mack
ind Flora Finch, will complete this
sxcellent program. c
GERMAN ADMIRAL
HITTINGAT DEWEY
BERLIN, Feb. 28. ? Admiral Von
31odrlchs, replying to the Btatemonta
undo by Admiral Dew'ey.regarding the
?lanlla afTair, said that Admiral Dew
y gradually talkod himself into a'pas
lon when they discussed the sltua
ion. He says Dewey satd to him:
Why, I sh'all atop^eVery vessel what-,
over may be her colors, and if she
loes not stop, I shall fire at her. Andj
hat means war, do you know It, sir?
'The second time that Admiral Dow
y used the phrase, 'If Germany wants
i-ar she can havo It'hero,' etc., I took
ay leave."
? * 4 ?
10THER AND DAUGHTERS
DIE IN SPOKANE FIRE
SPOKANE, Fob. 28. ? Mrs. Stella
larios and daughters, Helen and Gale,
god four and seven years, perished
rhen their home was destroyed by fire
tils morning. The mother was burn
d to death while trying to save Her
htldren.
II'OKANE SAILS FOR
ALASKA AT NOON
SEATTLE, Feb." 28.?The Spokane
ailed for Alaska at noon- today. She
ad the following passengers for Ju
eau: C. H. Gallagher, Phillip Galla
her, William Musphy, J. O. Morgan
. J. Granby, James McDonough, Rob
rt Benson, James Aunessex, Marlon
avis, H. 0. Hanson. 0. Hanson, P.
. Lyon, Andrew Ness.
For Douglas?Chris. Brown.
ESTRICTIONS NOT FOR
MINING CLAIMS
Surveyor General Charles E. David
>n today received cablegram advices
ora Commissioner Clay Tallman of
le general land office that the depart
tent had decided on February 19, in
le case of the Juneau mineral en
?ies 01487 and 01488, surveys 946 and
17, respectively, t^ the offect that the
mitatlons and conditions found in the
Jaska homestead acts relating to
tore frontngo and reserve shore
>aces betweon claims do not apply
>, nor effect mining claims in Alaska.
This is a direct reversal of the ln
ructions sent by circular letter of
ily 7, 1913. to the land offices of Alas
i, and will be received with popular
ivor throughout all Alaska.
STATEMENT
0 the People of Juneau:
If it were not that I know why a cer
dn Juneau newspaper has attacked
1 for the second time I would Jhlnk
strange that any newspaper or other
istltutlon in a growing town would
?y to drive from their midst a now
uslncss house bringing to the city
bw capital, new - enterprise and a
;ock of goods that would do credit to
ay large city.
I came here from Tacoma, where I
ave a metropolitan store, not as a
?ddler with a few hand bags, but with
line of goods of the latest styles and
ibrlcs that cost many thousand dol
irs, and I came to remain in Juneau
ad become a business man of the
Ity. I came here because I regard
nncau as the most promising city in
io making in the West.
It seems a very Bhort-slghted policy
> me that: a newspaper should set out
1th a determination to create a boy
?tt and prevent me from locating and
ius becoming a rent-payer, tax-pay
r, patron of the other merchants and
usiness men of the town, and a citl
an. It seems strange to me that bus
iess men would tolerate such a thing.
However, I know what Is troubling
ie paper now. It is the same thing
s when it attacked mo before. It
ought advertising from me when I
-as here last fall, and notwithstand
lg that It charged five cents less per
ich for the advertising that I gave it
tinn I paid Tbe< Empire, I dropped it
nd gave my business to the latter
aper, because I discovered that I was
citing better results, from The Em
ire. I was solicited by the manager
f the paper almost dally for adver
ising until a short time before I left,
nd he constantly quoted me a lower
rice than I was paying. When he
aw that I did not Intend to give him
ny business he attacked me in his
aper.
I had barely arrived in Juneau mo
ther day when a representative of
he paper approached me and nsked
or\ndvertislng. He first apologized
or the attack that tvbs made upon me
ast December. I refused to give him
ny business. Last night he nttacked
no again.
I wish some one who knows more
ibout such things than I do would tell
ne the difference between such prac
ices and blackmail.
(Signed) A. GREENBAUM.
runeau, Feb. 27, 1914. ??*
Mr and Mrs. Neal Van Houten leave
in the Sampson for the Koyukuk.
SEATTLE BETS ON
GILL TO WIN OUT
SEATTLE, Fob. 28.?The betting It
Seattle.on the Mayoralty eloctlon fu
vors 0111. Some wagers have beet
laid that ho will receive 5,000 major
lty. OddB are offered that ho will win
The contest Is one of the hottesl
ever had In the city of Seattle, and
the feeling is becoming lntonso. For
the first time In his political career
Gill Is appealing to the progressive el<
foment of the people. Ho promises to
clean Seattle up and make It a better
city morally than it ovor before has
been. He also pledges his support to
the municipal street car lines.
On the other hand, those support
ing Trenholme have attacked "Gill
ism" which they say is a synonlm for
vice and reactlonlsm. They point to
the fact that the preclnets of the
First, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth wards,
where the "vice syndicate" always has
controlled, gave Gill old tlmo major
ities In the primary.
Both sides expect to win. The Tren
holme supporters explain the betting
odds against their candidate by say
ing that moBt of those with betting
money are for Gill now as they were
two years ago when odds were offerod
that Gill would receive 5,000 major
ity.
AL-KI LOSES BLADES
AND PUTS BACK
SEATTLE, Feb. 28?The Al-Ki
which Railed for Alaska Thursday eve
ning, returned to port last night in
a crippled condition. She lost two
propeller blades while crossing the
Gulf-of Georgia. A new wheel will be
put on today and she will sail for the
North again tonight.
SKAGWAY FIR8T AND
JUNEAU 18 SECOND
The bowling in the international
contset last night made no change In
the relative position of the leaders,
though Dawson made the big scoring
for ttao evening.
Last night's record follows:
DawBon, 2503; Skagway, 2458;
Whltehorse, 2444; Juneau, 238G; and
Treadwell, 2243.
The standing of the teams with one
third of the games played is as fol
lows?Skagway. 4925; Juneau, 4788;
Whltehorse, 4763; Dawson, 4758; and
Treadwell, 4407.
The record of the Juneau bowlers
last night follows;
Freiman, 528; Barragar, 517; Dr.
Kaser. 474; Winn, 435; Hunter, 432.
High score, Barragar, 205; high av
erage, Frieman,. 176.
DEBLONDEAU NON-SUITED
This morning Judge R. W. Jennings
dismissed the suit of J. H. DeBlondeau
against Marshal H. L. Faulkner,
which has been on trial in the district
court before a Jury for the past few
days.
Hellenthal & Hellenthal, attorneys
for the defense, late yesterday after
noon interposed a motion to dismiss
on the ground that plaintiff as agent
for the owner of the property Involved
and for which suit was brought for
damages alleged to have sustained by
reason of unlawful seizure, did not
have authority to bring suit, and had
no cause for action. The decision non
suiting the plaintiff was read in the
court this morning.
Weldeleich Case Coming.
This afternoon the Jury is being se
lected to try the case of Weldeleich
against Townsend, which case will go
to trial Monday morning. Town prop
erty with Indian title situated near
the Chief Johnson property is involv
ed in the action.
Jim and Jimmy Clark Case Is Pro
gressing.
This affetaioon at 3, the case of Jim
and Jimmy Clark against Sheldon ov
er certain tract of land embraced with
in the survey of the Sheldon home
stead was taken up. Jim and Jimmy
Clark are Indians and claim title by
prior right of settlement and occupa
tlon to the land In question.
GOOD PICTURES AT JAXON'S RINK
Some extra good pictures will be
run at Jaxon's rink during the skat
ing tonight Admission to gallery, 1(
cents.
BIRD SEASON CLOSES.
?+?
Game Warden Adam Schneidei
says that the open season for all klndf
of birds will close Sunday (tomorrow)
night, March 1.
ROBBERS MAKE BIG
* HAUL IN PARIf
???
PARIS. Feb. 28.?Over J200.000 h
cash was stolen from a postofllce vai
this morning in this city. The rob
bers escaped.
McBride Declares Tor
- Immediate Railway line
L
MARINES READY TO
I GO TO MEXICO
PENSACOLA, Fla., Feb. 28?The
, United States transport Prairie with
' 700 marines on board Is all prepared
i to sail for Mexico on a moment's no
tice.
Bryan Agrees to Villa's Proposal.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28. ? Secre
tary of State William J. Bryan, act
ing for the United States and Great
Britain, last night accepted the last
proposal of Gen. Villa for the viewing
of the body of William S. Benton.
British Consul Percival at Galveston
will represent England In the official
party that will go to Juarez. It haB
not been announced who will repre
sent the United States.
? Colquitt Still Talks Fight
AUSTIN. Tex., Feb. 28.?Gov. O. B.
Colquitt again telegraphed to Secre
tary of State William J. Bryun last
night asking what method should be
followed In order to apprehend those
responsible for the killing of Vergara.
He added: "I do not want to invade
Mexico with a military force.' '
Taft Against Mexican Intervention.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28?Address
ing the National Geographical Society
last night former President William H.
Taft declared against Intervention in
Mexico, saying "no efforts should be
spared to prevent such a catastrophe."
I FOLK QUITS ONE JOB
BUT TAKES ANOTHER
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28. ? Former
Gov. Joseph W. Folk resigned last
night as solcitor for the State De
partment to become counsel for the
Interstate Commerce Commission.
EDITOR M'NAUGHTON
IS SERIOUSLY ILL
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 28.?W. W.
McNaughton, sporting editor of the
San Francisco Examiner and one of
highest authorities on sporting mat
ters in the United States, is danger
ously ill.
LONE BANDIT ROBS
RESTAURANT PATRONS
???
SEATTLE, Feb. 28.?A lone bandit
last night held up eight patrons of a
restaurant at Lester in the Cascade
mountains.
BISHOP ROWE BACK
AND ENTHUSIASTIC
?+?
SEATTLE, Feb. 28?The Right Rev.
Peter Trimble Rowe, Bishop of Alas
ka, returned to Seattle from Washing
i ton last night. He is enthusiastic ov
j er the outlook for Alaska on account
of the progressive attitude of the ad
: ministration with which he is great
I ly pleased.
M'COMBS IN LINE
FOR U. S. SENATOR
?+?
NEW YORK, Feb. 28.?It is believ
ed that William F. McCombs will yet
decide to become tho administration
candidate for United States Senator in
| New York. It is admitted by every
body that he will receive the nomina
j tion if he asks for it.
DANDITS SECURE $5,000
IN CALIFORNIA MINE
GRASS VALLEY. Calif., Fob. 28.?
Bandits robbed the North Star mine
yesterday taking amalgam containing
$5,000 in gold.
ANARCHY PREVAILS IN
REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL
MADRID, Feb. 28. ? The govern
ment has been informed that a condi
tion of anarchy and revolution pre
vails in Portugal.
i ? ? ?
' PRESIDENT GRAY HEADS
1 WESTERN MARYLAND ROAD
NEW YORK, Feb. 28?Former Pres
ident Gray of the Great Northern has
accepted the presidency of the West
ern Maryland Railroad.
i ? t t
1 JUDGE W. B. STOUT
BREAKS HIS LEG
HAINES, Feb. 26. ? Judge W. B
' Stout fell on the steps of the Presby
terian church last Sunday and broke
1 his leg. ?
l t t
" FRESH SEALSHIPT oysters a
Goldstein's. 10-9-tf.
VICTORIA, B. C? Feb. 28.?Prem
ier Sir Richard McBride, addressing
the Provincial Parliament last night,
said: "I believe the time has come for
the building of a railroad through
Northern British Columbia to Yukon ?
Territory and Alaska, and I may say
that the authorities at Washington and
Ottawa have both gone so far as to
heartily indorse some project of co
operation between the governments of
the United States and the Dominion
of Canada in the building of such a
line."
TAFT AGAINST NEW
JUDICIARY THEORIES
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28?At a meet
ing of the Congressional judiciary com
mittee hearing on the reform of Ju
dicial procedure in the United States
former President William H. Taft de
nounced the recall of judges propo
ganda also the recall of judicial de
cisions. He opposed the election of
Judges by the people.
PERKINS CRITICISES
PROFIT-SHARING PLANS
NEW YORK. Feb. 28.?George W.
? Perkins, criticising profit-sharing
| plans, says that the paying out of
lump sums each year tends to widen
rather than to narrow the breach be
tween employer and employee. He
favors tho plan by which the employ
ee's share of profits might be held in
the business "for a reasonable time,"
thus making the employee a part own
er in the business.
GERMAN STEAMSHIP
LINES ARE FUSING
?+?
BERLIN, Feb. 28. ? A provisional
agreement has been reached between
Albert Ballln and Phillip Heincken,
representing Hamburg-Amerlka and
Norddeutscher Lloyd lines, for a fu
stion of the interests of the two com
panies so far as North Atlantic trade
Is concerned.
CARNEGIE CREATES
NEW PEACE FUND
?+?
NEW YORK, Feb. 28.?Andrew Car
negie has given $2,000,000, Iqcome of
which 1b to be used through churches
for promotion of international peace.
The gift is In addition to the $10,000,
000 foundation established by Mr. Car
negie, Dec. 14, 1910, "to hasten the
abolition of international war."
ROCKEFELLER GIVEN
TIME TO DECIDE
CLEVELAND, O., Feb. 28.?The
Cleveland tax commissioners have
made an extension of time in which
John D. Rockefeller may file return on
personal property, claimed by the city
to be $900,000,000; the 50 per cent,
penalty for failure to file return on
time will probably be waived.
RAILROADS MAY
RE-FINANCE SELVES
NEW YORK, Feb. 28. ? The New
York American says: Improvement in
the bond market has caused three rail
roads to take up the subject of new
financing. They are the Erie, Balti
more & Ohio and Chesapeake & Ohio.
CHURCHES GROW AS
FAST AS COUNTRY
?+?
NEW YORK, Feb. 28. ? Statistics
show that church membership of the
United States increased 618,000 dur
ing 1913, a gain of 1.8%. This is at
a rate of 20% in a decade, and at fully
as great a pace as the growth In pop
ulation.
DICK CROCKER HITS
MURPHY HARD BLOW
NEW YORK. Feb. 28. ? A letter
written by Richard Croker, former
leader of Tammany, to John Fox. for
merly president of the National Dem
ocratic Club of New York, who
recently passed away, which has
t just come to light, says that he was
not surprised at the election of Mit
chel by a large diajority. He adds:
"Murphy was a big handicap to Mc
Call. The Hall never can win under
, Murphy's management. I hope a good
man will get in and drive all 'them'
grafters and contractors out."
REMOVAL NOTICE
Mrs. F. A. Stevens will move on
March 1st from 131 Front street to
t Room 1, Malony biulding, on Seward
street 2-24-6L

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