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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 03, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 396. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 1914. . PRICE, TEN OENTS
Lane and Goethals
Plan Alaska Road
? 4
CONFEREES HAVE AGREED '
Washington. Mar. 3. ? The j
conferees on the Alaska bill
have reached a tinal agreement
on the Alaska railroad bill. They
are now framing an entirely
new bill partly from the Senate
bill and parity from the House
bill.
4 4
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3? Secretary
of the Interior Franklin K. Lane and
Col. George W. Goethals conferred at
length yesterday regarding the con
struction of the Alaska railroad. They
concluded that much of the machinery
used in the construction of the Pana
ma canal can be used in the Alaska
work.
Congress to Act This Week.
WASHINGTON. Mar. 3.?It is ex
pected that both houses of Congress
will act on the report of the confer
ence committee before the close of the
day. It is believed that the report will
be agreed to and that the Presldnt will
immediately approve the measure.
The fact that Secretary of the In
terior l-ane is already making organi
zation plans for the actual work of
building the railroad is taken to mean
that the administration will accept the
amended bill, though, it is believed,
that it preferred the Senate ibll to the
amended measure.
DEMOCRATS SMOKE
TOMORROW NIGHT
Arrangements are now complete for
the big Democratic smoker and jolli
fication tomorrow night in honor of the
anniversary of the niauguratlon of
President Woodrow Wilson. It is to
be held in the Grand theatre begin
ning at 9 o'clock. Tom Cole will be
master of ceremonies.
The evening program will begin with
an address by Gov. J. F. A. Strong.
George Lovegrove will follow with en
tertaining monologue and music. J.
3. Marshall will deliver a short ad
dress to be followed by a wrestling
bout between Joe Fischer and an un
known from Douglas island. J. A. Hel
lenthal will deliver another brief ad
dress which will be followed by mov
ing pictures. There will be pipes a
plenty. Reservations have been made
for the Democratic club but the gener
al public is invited to attend.
JUDGE OSTRANDER'S
DEATH SHOCKS JUNEAU
The receipt of news of the death of
Judge John Y. Ostrander yesterday
caused a shock to the many people of
this city who learned to know and to
like him when he was a resident here
and during the frequent visits he has
made here since that time. Every
where were heard words of profound
sorrow.
Judge Ostrander was nearly 60 years
of age. and a pioneer of Washington
Territory and State. He was reared
in Olympia. where his father. Dr. N.
Ostrander. was a leading physician of
the early days. Later he practiced law
at Colfax. Whitman County. Wash.
During the first Cleveland administra
tion he was register of the land office
at Seattle. I^ater he practiced law
there in partnership with Joseph W.
Gregory, specializing in land law. He
was a strong character, the soul of
honor and integrity and an able law
yer. He is survived by a widow and
many relatives in Olympia and other
sections of Washington, and by un
countable friends.
THIRD ORE BODY NOW BEING
ENCOUNTERED AT KENSINGTON
J. R. Whipple, assistant general man
ager ot the Alaska Gastineau Mining
company and of the Kensington Mines
company, returned from a trip of in
spection to the Kensington mines and
brings back some very satisfactory
news. The ore bdoy, which it was hoped
would be found in the Johnson lead,
running parallel to the Eureka and
Kensington leads, has been encounter
ed by Superintendent B. B. Nelding in
the Kensington crosscut tunnel, which
has been extended into the Johnson
lead.
The ore encountered is very satis
factory but the extent of it is not as
yet known. A great deal depends on
the extent of the deposit It is approx
imates that of either of the other leads
the Kensington mine will have enough
ore In sight to warrant the erection of
a plant to work on an economic basis.
The Bull Moose Chile Con Carne is
hard to beat, 15c, at 396 Front st.
?2-26-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?40.
Minimum?33.
Precipitation?.75.
Cloudy and rain.
MODERN BUILDING TO
1 REPLACE ANCIENT LOGS
Juneau's historic log church build
ing at Third and Main streets, is doom
ed. The ancient structure is to be
torn down to make room for the erec
tion of a handsome new buslucss block
tor the Kaglo Brewing company. S.
Zynda, proprietor of the brewery and
owner of the property announced this
, morning that active work will begin
just as soon as the architect can com
plete the. plans. Yestonlay engineers
'busied themselves establishing the
lines of the property. The building
will be completed this spring.
The new structure will stand im
mediately In fronm of tho present
brewery buildin, and will be 50 x 50
: feet, three stories and basement, mak
ing four stories all told. The basement
will be of solid concrete. The first
:or main floor will contain the offices]
of the brewery, bottling department
jand washroom for the brewery. The
second -and third floors will be ar
ranged for either offices or lodgings.
The old log building holds many
cherished memories. It was the first
church building of the community in
the early days. Within its walls sweet
little babes in nrms, now charming
young ladies of Juneau society, re
ceived their chirstening.
*? .
RAILROAD BILL MAKES
ALASKA PROMINENT
E. E. Flcmming, one of the principal
owners in the Glacier Fisheries com
pany who arrived on the Admiral
Sampson early yesterday and is stay
ing at the Hotel Cain, says that every
body in Seattle is getting excited over
the passage of the railroad bill and
they are all anticipating great devel
! opments to the Territory and increased
business for Seattle as a result.
"The Glacier Fisheries company's
floating cold storage plant, the Glory
of the Seas, will probably return to
| her post at Idaho Inlet about May 1."
said Mr. Fleraming. "The company
expects to put up about the same pack
as last year." x
SKAGWAY BOWLERS
TO PLAY JUNEAU
?
The Skagway team, which holds
the lead in the telegraphic internation
al bowling tournament that is in pro
gress now. will play the Juneau team,
that holds second place in that con
test. on the Elks' club alleys tomor
row evening. The Skagway bowlers,
at the head of whom is W. C. Blanch
ard. will be accompanied to this city
; by a number of rooters. They leave
Skagway on the Mariposa tonight.
The Juneau team that will meet the
[Skagway aggregation is composed of
J. E. Barragar, Sim Frieman, Earle
Hunter. Dr. E. H. Kaser and Milton
Winn.
The Juneau team in the internation
al bowling tournament will roll the
third series of games in that contest
tonight at the Elks' club.
YOUNG COUPLE WED
AND KEEP IT QUIET
Miss Mildred Erickson and Russel
G. Casey, popular in Juneau's young
er society set, were quietly married
at the Presbyterian manse Saturday
night. Rev. J. B. Stevens officiated.
The wedding was kept a profound se
cret and even the father of the groom
was not aware of what had taken place
; until yesterday afternoon.
Both of the young contracting par
i ties were reared in Juneau. The
bride is the daughter of Mrs. Peter
Gravrock, and the groom is the son j
of W. W. Casey. They will make their
home in the cottage Mr. Casey recent
ly built.
FEDERAL MINE INSPECTOR
LEAVING FOR INTERIOR
Sumner S. Smith, Federal mine in
spector for Alaska, has booked pass
I age on the Alameda for the Westward.
He is starting on his annual tour of
! Alaska and expects to return In July.
' He will go direct from Cordova to Mc
J Carthy's and then into the Chlsana be
fore proceeding to Fairbanks. At
Fairbanks he will in^eet Territorial
Mine Inspector William Maloney- and
they will then cover the lower Yukon
country and Seward peninsula togeth
er. After returning in July he expects
jto go again to the Wcstwyard and In
[ spcct the Valdes and Seward country.
Mrs. Smith will be a passenger on
the Southbound Mariposa tonight en
route to Oakland to spend the sum
mer.
NO ATHLETIC CLUB
DANCE THIS WEEK
The Juneau Athletic Club will omit
its regular Thursday night dance this
week. The next of the popular dances
' of this organization will probably be
next week.
LAYING FOUNDATION
FOR MAIN BUILDING
Yestorday the construction crews
began pouring cement into the forms
that are set for the massive concrete
foundations for the big steel struc
ture that is to be the main building
for the first unit of the Alaska Gastln
cau Mining company's ore reduction
works at* Sheep creek. By the time
the steel reaches hero for the super
structure the concrete wili be firmly
set and there will be no delay in the
progress of erection.
The steel for the coarse crushing;
plant for this unit of the works Is now
in transit and has reached Seattle al
ready. It will be at its final dcstlna
tion in a short while and the struc
ture will be erected immediately on its
arrival.
Tunnel Ready April 1.
"The Sheop creek tunnel will bo
finished by April 1," said General Man
ager B. L. Thane this morning and I
am well pleased at the progress made
all along the line. During February
the big tunnel was extended 500 feet
although there was a shortage of air
for the aiachines on account of lack of
power to operate the compressors to
sufficient capacity.
"If the weathor holds out as i?t pres
ent indicated we shall be nhle to re
sume construction on the Salmon creek
dam ar.d I expect we will be pouring
cement by April 1."
Col. Jackling Coming.
Mr. Thane says that Col. Jnckling
expects to leavo Seattle for Junenu
about March 20. It is quite proble
that he will steam up the coast in his
new yacht, the Cyprus.
INSURANCE COMPANY
SENDS THE CHECK
By the last mail C. T. Gardner was
in receipt of a check from the North
ern Life Insurance company for set
tlement in full on his insurance policy
for the accident he sustained while
skating last month. He informs the
Miner that the company made no de
lay in settling up on recoipt of the
certificate of the physician attending
him during the time he was incapaci
tated. This speaks well for the In
surance company and will no doubt
make them friends in this region. ?
Ketchikan Miner.
MISS KEMPTHORNE IS
ILL AT HER HOME
??? .. .u.. -. ....
Miss Edith Kempthorne is ill at her
home. As a consequence the musical
which she was to give tonight at the
Odd Fellows' hall has been postponed,
and her classes in music must be giv
en a few days' vacation.
THE CORDOVA BRINGS
LADYSMITH COAL
The Cordova arrived in port at 3
p. m. today with five hundred
tons of Ladysmith coal for the city
bunkers.
SEYMOUR EATON, of the Cincin
nati! Enquirer, writes: "The man who
succeeds must fill his job so full that
he bulges out a little at the top when
people can see him."
The successful store must do the
same thing only In a different way.
The goods must be on hand, the prices
must be right, tho service must be
commendable, tho trading must be
square?the kind of square that has
four equal sides and four right angles.
And this is what the JUNEAU "DRUG
CO. is aiding to do. Try us and see.
Opp. Alaskan Hotel, phone 250.?3-^-tf
NOTICE TO VOTERS
?+?
The registration book for qualified
voters of the City of Juneau, Territory
of Alaska, for the year nineteen hun
dred fourteen, are now open In the
Municipal Clerk's office In the city
hall, and will remain open until Sat
urday, April fourth, nineteen hundred
fourteen at four p. m. All those desir
ing to vote at the regular April elec
tion should register, for the reason
that parties not registered wilt hot
bo permitted to vote.
E. W. PETTIT,
Officer of Registration.
Juneau. Alaska, Mar. 2, 1914.
i First publication Mar. 2, 1914.
CONCERT POSTPONED
The Liszt Musical to be given by
Miss Kempthorne on Tuesday Is un
avoidably postponed. Miss Kemp
thorne Is unable to give lessons tor
a few days. 3-2-tf.
ROYAL FRUIT CO.
has another large shipment of fruit
and vegetables that arrived on the Ad
miral Sampson. We are selling, spe
cial for this week, Washington Cream
ery and Seattle Queen butter at 35c
a pound!! Over 2,000 dozen eggs sold
at three dozen for a dollar. Fresh
ranch eggs. No cold storage, at any
price. This shipment will be closed
out at this price. We make large sales
and small profits. Prices permanently
low. 3-2-tf.
FRESH SEALSHIPT oysters at
Goldstein's. 10-9-tf.
Tho Bull Moose has a free reading
, room In connection. 396 Front at.
j ?2-26-tf.
CITY CO-OPERATES
WITHGOLDSTEIN
At a special meeting of the sit)
counscll, held last night, a contract
was entered Into between the cltj
and Charles Goldstd* whereby the lat
ter Is to advance $5(W pay for the cosl
of installing the city rock crusher os
the site chosen for It and the formoi
is to furnish crushed rock to Mr. Gold'
stein at 35 cents per yard. It Is est!
mated that he will require upwards ol
1600 yards of crushed rock for the new
concrete Goldstein building at Second
and Seward streets. At the same
meeting auother contract was made
whereby the city Is to sell 600 yards
of sand now lying on the school prop
erty to Mr. Goldstein at 75 cents per
yard. The rock cruBher will bo in
stalled and oporated under the direc
tion of the city engineer.
Under this arrangemont the city
gets the rock crusheMnstalleil without
an outlay of cash and Mr. Goldstein
Is assured of getting an early start on
the construction of his new business
block. The sand sold was saved from
the excavation made on the school
property by the present administra
tion and 1b piled up on the school
grounds. It 1b a distinct advantage to
got this sand and Mr. Goldstein ex
pects to begin delivery of both sand
and rock by the midle of April. Tha
building will probably commence to
take form early In Maiy.
CHANGE NIGHT ,'.T ORPHEUM
The Orpheum thentre will offer a
complete change of program tonight
with the following first class photo
plays:
"Three Friends," a strog Blograph
dra Ith n good story.
"i Across the Continent," Is
a fl Edison production, pre
senting a detective's chase through
many large cities and scenes and In
cidents in each.
"Freckles," a Vltagraph comedy, and
a good one, with John Bunny and Flora
Finch, all to the merry.
"A Pair of Boots,"' and -iHow the
Duke of Lelsuro Reached Home." two
good Selig farce comedies, complete
an excellent program.
Save your coupons.
Watch for the Great Steeplechase.
NOTICE.
The Juneau Ladles* Musical Club
will rehearse at the usual hour on
Tuesday eveuUig. i&arch 3rd, instead
of Wednesday evening as had been
planned. MRS. E. H .KASER, Secy.
NEW NOTARY.
M. P. Hurd, enroute to the Chisana,
has been appointed a notary public
by Gov. J. F. A. Strong.
HOWARD MALONE.COMING
In a recent letter Tloward Malone
states that he expects to leave Chltina
for Juneau soon after March 10;
LEAVING ON MARIPOSA.
The following have taken pussago
on the Mariposa sailing South to
night: Mrs. Sumner S. Smith, Mrs. J.
F. Anderson, F. G. Dorman, Otto Wu
orenpaa and wife, Miss L. Gltmore,
Mtb. E. H. Gowran, Miss Dawn Gow
ran.
ARRIVALS BY GEORGIA.
The Georgia arriving from Sitka bad
the following passengers for Juneau:
from Sitka ? G. A. Getchell, Charles
Pearce, E. R. Young, Ed. Nordlund,
John Bobek, Peter Kosten; from Ten
akee?W. Flemming A. Pearson; from
Gypsum?E. J. Carlyle, C. D. Knap^>;
from Hoonah?E. Buschman. .
AL-KI BRINGING CROWD.
The Al-Ki, sailing from-Scattle Sun
day at noon, has 120 passengers for
Juneau.
4 ?.
I ? I
MARINE .N-OTE8
I I
4 4
The Mariposa left Cordova Sunday
at midnight and should arrive in Ju
neau between 8 and 10 o'clock tonight
The Alameda is expected from the
Couth at 12 o'clock tonight.
The Spokane is expected from the
South tonight or early tomorrow.
The Princess Maquinna is expected
from the South tonight or tomorrow.
The Humboldt is scheduled to ar
rive from the South March 7.
The Al-Ki did not get away from
Seattle until Sunday noon and is ex
pected here Thursday afternoon.
The Jefferson is scheduled to arrive
from the South March 9.
The Admiral Evans is scheduled to
arrive from tho South Mardh 9.
The Admirnl Sampson is scheduled
to arrive from the Westward Mar. 9.
The Cordova is expected to arrive
tonight.
The Georgia arrived from Sitki
last night and will leave for Skagwa)
.tomorrow at 2 a. m.
The-ilochollo has sailed for Douglai
and Lynn canal.
Fred V. Berger, the expert rifle
shotgun and revolver marksman, wil
leave on tho Mariposa for the South.
TAMMANY TAKES
I THE HEMLOCK
r NEW YOIIK, Mar. 3.?Thirty-thfco
t members of the Democratic State Cen
' tral committee, most of whom were
, Tatumany men and one of whom was
k Charles F. Murphy, unanimously voted
. to put Gov. Martin H. Glynn's re-or
. ganlzat'on plans for the committee in
. to efTect. William Church Osfcornj an
> ti-Tammany and a strong administra
tion supporter, who hod been selected
by Gov. Glynn, after consultation with
, President Woodrow Wilson, National
Chairman William P. McCombs and
Mayor John Purroy Mitchell, for
chairman of the committee was elect
ed to the position to succeed George
M. Palmer, without a dissenting vote.
The plans that wore approved con
template the complete elimination of
Tammany from the councils, of the
State organization.
PAUL D'HEIRRY DIES
AT CHITINA HOME
VALDEZ, Mar. 3.?Paul d'Heirry,
United States commissioner at Chit
lna, fromerly editor of Valdez, for
many years an Alaskan and at one
time assistant attorney-general of
Washington, died suddenly this morn
ing at Chltlna of desease of the heart.
? ? ?
LONG DISTANCE SWIMMER
DIES IN LAST EFFORT
SEATTLE. Mar. 3.?Arthur Cavill,
former holder of the world's long dis
tance swimming record, Bought to
swim across Seattle harbor from West
Seattle to the city Sunday and died
of exhaustion when within 200 yards
of tho goal.
NEW HAYTIEN GOVERNMENT
WILL BE RECOdNIZED
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3.?Secretary
of State William J. Bryan announced
last night that tho now Haytien gov
ernment will be recognized Immed
iately.
DISSOLUTION OF SHIPPING
TRUST NOT PRACTICABLE
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3.?The House
committee appointed two years ago to
Investigate the shipping trust has re
ported that domestic and foreign ship
ping interests are so combined by
agreements and pools that any at
tompt to dissolve them would cripple
trade:
HOLDING COMPANIES
TO BE ABOLISHED
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3.?It Is con
ceded that the elimination of holding
companies will constitute a vital part
of the administration's anti-trust pro
gram. Railroad managers are already
studying this subject, which has, how
over, attracted little attention In the
Industrial group.
BAILEY FIGHTS AGAINST
FREE CUBA SUGAR
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3. ? Former
Senator Joseph W. Bailey, of Texas,
announced this morning that permis
sion will be asked of the United States
Supreme Court to file In tho name of
the State of Louisiana an original suit
to restrain the government from ad
mitting Cuban dugar free of duty. The
suit will be to test the validity of the
act of Congress.
DANCE THURSDAY NIGHT.
Owing to the postponement of the
weekly dance given by the Juneau Ath
letic club at Elks' hall Thursday night,
March G, tho Juneau orchestra, which
will be augmented to the full strength
of that organlation will give a dance
?hat evening.
The orchestra will be under the di
rection of Prof. J. Sumpf which Is aj
guarantee that the music will be up-to
its usual high standard. If you don't
dance como and enjoy the music. Ad
mission, $1; ladies free. 3-3-3L
GRAND.
The same good pictures tonight:
? "Her Ispiration," a good touching
drama. 4
"Petticoat Detective," a good play,
that will make you smile.
"The Consequences," a good strong
drama by the Victor.
"A Dry Town," a good laughable
comedy.
New pictures tomorrow.
FOR SALE?A complete restaurant
and boarding house outfit; $150 will
i handle this, apply 396 Front st 3-2-4t
> H. E. Townsend. a popular tonsor
ial artist, returned on the Admiral
t Sampson, and will remain in Juneau.
. Mr. Townsend spent the winter at his
> old home In Tacoma.
H. C. Yeomans, a Seattle traveling
l man, staying at the Occidental, has
' taken passago for the South on the
Mariposa.
i G. E. James is a returning passen
ger on the Alameda.
Miss Georgia Caro, who has been 111
, at the home of her parents for a week,
1 Is well again, and returned to school
yesterday.
, ? 1
STORM HOLDS EAST
IN ITS GRIP
NEW YORK, Mar, 3.?The North)
Atlantic States are In the throes of
another blizzard that is worso than any
of the storms of this winter, which
has been more severe than any In
years.
The suffering In this city has been
Intense. Eleven persons have perished
within the limits of Greater New York
In the last 24 hours.
Thirteen' Dead at Philadelphia.
PHILADELPHIA. Mar. 3.?Thirteen
deaths have occurred In this city and
nearby towns within the last 24 hours
that urc directly attributed to the
storm that has been raging.
Trains and traffic of all kinds are
suspended.
Vice-President Marooned.
PHILADELPHIA, Mar. 3. ? Vice
President Thomas R. Marshall was
marooned for 14 hours yesterday and
la3t night near Ndw Brunswick. N. J.,
on account of the snow storm which
delayed the train on which he .was
traveling.
HEAVY VOTE BEING
POLLED IN SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Mar. 3.?Voting is heavy
In all section of Seattle today and the
Indications at noon are that the vote
will be as large as that of two years
ago when George F. Cotterlll was elec
ted Mayor over Hiram C. Gill by a
few less than 1,000 votes. The sup
porters of both Trenholme and Gill
arc working hard to get their vote to
the polls.
WAS SENATOR TURNER'S
RESIGNATION REQUESTED
?*?
SEATTLE, Mar. 3.?The delay In
the announcement of the Senatorial
candidacy of former Senator George
Turner tnken In connection with the
promptness with which his successor
on the international commission was
nominated hns lead to the belief in
many placcB that his resignation was
requested by the administration.
SEATTLE BOYS DROWN
IN LAKE UNION
?+?
SEATTLE, Mar. 3.?Walter and Clif
ford, sons of C. F. Schroeder, a local
manufacturer, aged nine and 20 years,
respectively, were drowned Sunday
when the boat in which they were
sailing on I^akc Union was capsized.
RICH CHICAGO MAN
KILLED BEFORE MARRIAGE
?
CHICAGO, Mar. 3.?Casclus M. Fair
man, a wealthy business man, who
was engaged to marry MIbs Elizabeth
Davidson, of Omaha, was found mur
dered in the railroad yards yesterday.
Miss Davidson Investigates.
CHICAGO, Mar. 3.?Miss Davidson
arrived here this afternoon and insti
tuted an Investigation into the Murder
of her fiancee, Casius M. Fairman.
CHIEF WITNESS KILLS
PRISONER IN COURT
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Mar. 3.?Wesley Si
mon, while on trial for the murder of
Emmett Carroll, was shot and killed
yesterday during a recess of court by
Henry Zugg. the chief witness for the
feudists opposed to the prisoner.
THIRTY-TWO REGISTER
THE FIRST DAY
Yesterday, the first day of registra
tion for the regular annual municipal
election, resulted in the recording of
32 names, several of whom were wom
en, who are now preparing to exercise
the elective franchise for the first time
In Juneau. The first woman to regis
ter was Mrs. G. J. Swenson. City
Clerk E. W. Pettlt, who is registra
tion officer, finds difficulty in getting j
responses to the query regarding ago
and Is often forced to smile and fill In
"legal age." -
SENATE FAVORS NO
FREE CANAL TOLLS
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3. ? Senator
Henry Cabot Lodge has announced
that a canvass of the Senate disclosed
that a majority favored a repeal of
the clause in the Panama canal act
giving free tollB to American ships en
gaged in coastwise traffic.
Bert Sperry made the trip to Ken
sington and return on the last trip of
the Iowa.
?ft
Tim Vogel, well known mine opera
tor of Porcupine, leaves for his home
in Halnos this week.
Robert Scott, well known traveling
man, arrived on the Adimlral Samp
son from the States.
President Wilson Says
Situation is Delicate
? i>
GREAT BRITAIN WAITING
11
London, Mar. 3.?Sir Edward
Grey, Secretary of State for For- *
eign Affairs, announced today
that no immediato action could
be taken In connoctlon with the
deadlock over the Investigation
into the death of Benton. He
explicitly stated that If Great
Britain failed to get satisfaction
through the United States the
British government reserved
the right to procure reparation
when it was able to do so.
+ ?
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3.?President
Woodrow Wilson revealed last night
to those with whom he discussed Mex
ican affairs that he fully realles the
gravity of the situation growing out
of the Benton, Bauch and Vergara af
fairs as they are coupled with Gen.
Carranza'8 denial of the right of the
United States to look after the inter
ests of foreigners in Mexico.
The President spoke deplorlngly of
the possibility of being forced to armed
Intervention, and pointed to the size
and power of the United States as be
ing sufficient warrant for pursuing a
patient course.
Yet, those who heard the President
talk, wero impressed with the evident
fact that he has been thinking a great
deal of the possibility, if, indeed, not
the probability of ultimate Interven
tion. It is believed that If it shall
come to that there will bo no weakness
in the execution of the work.
Mexicans Still Expect Intervention.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3?A dispatch
received from Mexico City says "the
opinion that ultimate Intervention con
stitutes the only solution of the Mex
ican situation Is held so widely in Mex
ico that it is startling."
PRED AYER WINS
RACE ON NERVE
NOME, Mar. 3.?Fred Ayer literally
dragged his dog team to victory yes
terday winning the Solomon Derby
from Nome to Solomon and return in
six hours and 30 mlntes. He was hard
pressed at the finish by Jack Johnson,
who was a close second, with his Si
berian wolves. Johnson was just two
minutes behind Ayer.
Ayqer made the pace so fast that his
dogB were practically exhausted at the
finish, and it was only through the
strength, endurance and nerve of their
driver that they won the guelling race.
RECREANT HUSBAND
IS WIFE'S EXECUTOR
NEWARK, N. J.. Mar. 3.?Charles J.
Manning 1b named as sole heir and
executor In the will of his wife, who
was shot by Miss Hazel Herdman.
Mrs. Manning's estate consist of
property in Montclalr valued at $10,
000 and $2,400 willed to her by her
father, which she received a few days
before she was slain.
PINCHOT ANNOUNCES
SENATORIAL CANDIDACY
MIDFORD, Mar. 3.?Glfford Pinchot
today announced his candidacy for the
United States Senate to succeed Sen
ator Boise Penrose. Ho will make
the race as a Progressive and asks for
the nomination of that party. It has
been known for some time that he
would become a candidate.
Pinchot's Announcement Cauiet No
Surprise.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 3. ? The an
[ nouncement of Pinchot's candiacy for
tho Progressive Senatorial nomination
has caused no surprise. It has been
known for some time that he would
be a candidate for the place, and pre
liminary campaign work has been done
with that understanding.
Representative A. Mitchell Palmer
announced his candicay for the Dem
ocratic nomination for Senator some
time ago.
Penrose, Palmer and Pinchot will all
have opposition within their own par
ties for the Senatorial nomination but
it is believed here that they will bo
the nominees. Tho full strength of the
?*nini8tratlon will be exerted in behalf
of Palmer after the primaries. Sever
al of the Cabinet officers will make
speeches for him, and it is claimed by
Palmer's friends that President Wood
row Wilson will make at least two or
three speeches for him.
Mrs. E. H. Gowran and daughter,
Dawn, are leaving for Seattle on the
Mariposa tpnlght.
Miss P. M. Patterson and Miss Cath
erine Young, trained nurses, arrived
on the Admiral Sampson and expect
to secure positions here or nearby.
They have apartments at the Occi
dental.

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