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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 21, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. III., NO. 511. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1911. PRICE, TEN CENTS
' I *
Gen. Villa Ready For
Attack on Torreon
YERMO. Chihuahua. March 21.?
Geu. Villa's army is on the outskirts
of Torreon and the guns of his artil
lery are being placed preparatory for
an attack on the city. Gen. Villa stat-;
ed last night that he expected to cap-;
ture the Federal stronghold within a1
week.
Gen. Villa's army now numbers 12.- i
000 men. well armed and well supplied
with ammunition. More are being ad
ded to his forces all tho time.
Reinforcements Going North.
MEXICO CITY March 21?Gen. Hu
erta is sending all available troops to
Torreon to reinforce the army at that
place. It is realized here that a great
deal depends upon the outcome of the
fighting that will take place within the
next few days at Torreon. 1
Lind and Rogas Confer.
PARIS. March 21.?Secretary of
State William J. Bryan today announc
ed that John Lind and Mexican For
eign Minister Rojas have held a con- '
ference at Vera Cruz.
NO QUORUM FOR
COUNCIL LAST NIGHT ?
Captain J. T. Martin, chief of police '
of the city of Juneau did not get an '
opportunity to have his resignation 1
acted upon last evening for the reason
that there was no quorum present,
and his request to be relieved of the '
duties of office could not be granted ]
by the City Council.
Mayor C. W. Carter called the coun
cilmen to order and ordered roll call. <
but could not secure the required num
ber on account of the absence of
Councilmen Huribut, Pullen and Ged
des. His honor then adjourned the ,
meeting until Wednesday evening at ,
$ o'clock. At this point in the pro- (
ceedings Mr. Martin asked to have his j
resignation accepted, but was informed .
by the Mayor that he could only ac- ,
cept and file it for action by the coun- ,
cil at the forthcoming meeting, in (
connection with this action Mr. Car- j
ter paid Capt. Martin a nice compli
ment for his conduct as an officer and ,
said that it was with sincere regret .
that circumstances necessitated the
change, but he hoped the police offi- j
cer did not retain any hard or ill feel- ,
ing toward the council, and assured
him that the council membership felt ,
only the highest respect for him.
City Attorney Marshall added that
Capt. Martin, as chief of police did
not confine himself alone to the du- <
ties of the office but had done- many (
things for the promotion of the moral s
welfare of the city: he had gone out
of the routine of his dut'es to serve j
the city, and no matter how long Ju- )
neau remained a municipality, it j
would never have a more consciencious
and efficient officer than Capt. Mar- ,
tin. whose resignation had been pre
sented. (
Mayor Carter then told Capt. Mar
tin that he was to continue as chief
of police until such time as the coun- ,
cil acted upon his resignation. After ;
mutual thanks, the council adjourned. ?
SPRING BEGINS WITH
VERNAL EQUINOX TODAY
Today la the first day of spring. ,
The vernal equinox occured this morn- t
Ing at about 2 o'clock. Juneau time. ;
when the center of the sun passed ]
the equator on its northward jour- ,
ney. As a matter of fact, however, |
we have bad 12 hours or more of sun- ;
shine each day for several days. There i
has been enough of Old Sol north of
the equator for its rays to be visible
for more than 12 hours at Washing
ton since last Wednesday. On that
day the son rose at the National capi
tal at 9 minutes past 6 a. m. and set '
at 9 minutes past 6 p. m. At this lati
tude the preponderance of sunshine
over darkness will increase rapidly
until the summer solstice which will
occur at Juneau this year at about 9
p. m.. June 21st. making that day the
longest of the year.
MOTION PICTURES TO BE
AT THE NEW LOUVRE
W. S. Scribner and L. L. Clay, the
new proprietors of the Louvre, have
decided upon a marked innovation for
their place of business. They are go
ing to add motion pictures to the es
tablishment. The pictures will be
shown at the rear of the bar, and ar
rangements have been made to se
cure carefully selected films for the
place. The show will be free.
COMMITTEE SECURES
BASEBALL GROUNDS
The committee appointed to secure
baseball grounds has completed its
work and will report at the meeting
of the Baseball Association which has
been called by Chairman B. L. Thane
for next Tuesday evening in his of
fices. Mr. Thane states that if the
association ratifies tho work of the
committee and he believes that it will,
that the entire business will be cleaned
up at the Tuesday night meeting, and
withlng twenty-four hours active work
of preparing the park can be under
way. It is considered unwise to make
known the plans that the committee
have decided upon until the associa
tion has passed on the matter.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p.m.:
Maximum?43.
Minimum?37.
Precipitation?.03.
Cloudy, rain.
MAY WALK THROUGH
MOUNTAIN APRIL 1
The Sheep Creek tunnel will likely
be finished, and Col. Jackling may
walk through the mountain from
Sheep Creek to Gold Creek, before
April 1. If the present rate of pro
gress continues it will certainly be
finished before that time?there is a
distance of 350 feet separating the
crews working from the Perseverance
end and Paddy O'Nlel's experts. There
remains eleven days in which to do
the stunt. For the past three days
O'Nell's men have averaged 2S feet
each day, while the Perseverance crew
is making 13 feet each day or a total
of 41 feet. In order to finish by April
1, the two crews must average close
to 32 feet. It is the hope to have it
ready for Col. Jackling to walk through
and inspect when he comes from the
South. He will arrive on March 28
and is scheduled to leave April 1 or
?>
To Start on the Big Dam.
"If this weather holds out," said ,
General Manager B. L. Thane, of the
Alaska Gastineau Mining company this
morning, "we shall soon be pouring
:ement again on the big Salmon creek [
inm. I have ordered 500 tons of ce
ment shipped April 5, 1000 tons April
15. and 500 tons April 25. This will
enable us to get the warehouses com
pletely stocked while getting every
thing in running order.
'BRONCHO". FEATURE IS VERY 1
GOOD AT THE GRAND.
"Blue Grass Romance"?An exciting
Civil war feature was certainly the
most heart-touching play ever pro- 1
luced at the Grand Theatre. It is a 1
photoplay that every mother, father
ind son should see. The father is;,
compelled to send his own son to be^
shot?having been captured spying on.
the Confederate army. The father be
ing a general in the cause of the south, j,
Come tonight, as this is the last j
time we will show this film. We guar
antee tonight's bill?It is very good. 1
"Gaumont Weekly."?With all the
nterestlng events from the world. Al-'i
ways good.
"A Kimona Tragedy." A comedy I j
that is sure to please. I (
<
Sunday's Program.
A complete change of program for j
Sunday. All first-class photoplays, es- ,
>ecially selected for the Sunday night (
ihow.
"Till the Day Breaks." Very exclt
ng Solox drama. Don't miss it. A
tuman and compelling story of hero
sm and sacrfice.
"Saved From Sin." A story that is; J
rery enjoyable.
"Blackened Hills." Thrilling and
Iramatlc. A story of love and villany.
American make.
"The Commuter's Cat." Thanhaus-;
t>r comedy that will make you all feel |
is though you had passed an enjoy
tblo evening.
PETE CONLEY IN TOWN.
* I
Pete Conley, one of Paddy O'Neil's
?ight bowers in the Sheep Creek tun
lel work, was in town today to see 1
Mrs. Conley, who has been in the hos- '
jital since last January, having met j'
with an accident on her way to the :
lospital to see her husband, who was1 (
it that time confined in that institu- !
tlon with a broken collarbone.
NOTICE OF ELECTION.
TO THE ELECTORS o fthe City of .
Juneau. Division No. 1, Territory of (
Alaska. NOTICE is hereby given that
pursuant to Ordinance No. 135, of the ?
City of Juneau, passed and approved
by the Common Council on February
20. 1914, a general election, for the i
purpose of electing seven Councilmen
and one School Director, for the City
of Juneau, as provided in said ordi
nance. will be held on Tuesday, April'
seventh, nineteen hundred and four
teen, between the hours of nine o'clock
a. m., and seven o'clock p. m. of said
day;
That the voting place for the above
stated election will be in Fire Appara
tus Room in the new City Hall build
ing, located at the corner of Fourth
and .Main Streets, in the City of Ju
neau, and that the entrance to said
room Is on the Fourth Street side of
said building;
That the qualifications of electors
at said election are as follows: Any
citizen of the United States, whether
male or female, and any person who
has filed a declaration of intention to
become such, is entitled to exercise
the elective franchise in the City of
Juneau: Provided, such person shall
be found of the full age of twenty-one
years and shall have been a bona fide
resident of the Territory of Alaska
for one year and of the City of Ju-^
neau for six months next preceding
the date of election.
Dated at Juneau. Alaska, this 18th
day of March. 1914.
E. W. PETIT.
Municipal Clerk of the City of Juneau
3 18-tf.
LADIES HAIR GOODS, remodeling
of switches, puffs, etc., in modish
styles at "The Vogue Shop". Opp.
Orpheum Theatre. Mrs. Albert Berry.
3-20-Tues. Thu, Sat.
STRAWBERRIES?more of them
coming on the Jefferson?make your
reservations early.
ROYAL FRUIT CO., Phone 280.
SWAN PLANS POR
HIS TWOCOMPANIES
W. F. Swan, president and general
manager of the Swan Navigation com
pany, and superintendent of the Port
laud Steamship company, with offices
in Seattle, is In Juneau In connection
with the business of the two compan
ies.
"The Portland Steamship Company,
formerly the Pacific Steamship Com
pany, will operate threo vessels on the i
Alaska run," said Mr. Swan this morn
ing?"the J. B. Stetson, Quinault and
tho Thomas L. Wand. In connection
with them, the Swan Navigation com
pany will operate two steamers out
of Seattle?the Rochelle and a steam-1
er yet to be selected. These take the.
place of the Bertha and tho Jeanie, :
which wero operated by the Swan Nav- '
igatiou Company last year.
"The Portland Steamship company, I
of which N. F. Titus is general mana
ger, has already contracted to trans- i
port 9,000 tons of freight to Southeast- I
em Alaska. <
"Tho J. B. Stetson will sail froni
Portland tonight; tho Thomas L Wand,
on her second trip, March 25th, and
tho Quinalt, April 1st. After that date
there will be weekly sailings.
"In addition to being freight steam
ers the J. B. Stetson and Quinault have 1
accommodations for passengers?the '
former for 40 and the latter for 20.
"Tho steamers of both companies 1
have a freight carrying capacity of '
about 1000 tons each per trip." \
Mr. Swan, who is an old-timer in
Juneau, where he was for many yenrs
agent for the Pacific Coast Steamship 1
Company, hns been meeting old friends
in Juneau since arriving on the Ad- |
miral Sampson. He wilt be here for
several days yet.
T. J. Patterson to Locate Here.
T. J. Patterson, vice-president(of the |
Swan Navigation company, will bo (
here soon to establish Alaska head- j
qunrtcrs for tho Swan Navigation com- |
pany and the Portland Steamship com- t
pany. He will be located permanently j
in Alaska with offices at Juneau. Mr. j
Patterson was for many yenrs in
charge of the United States cable of
fice at this place. * '
COMING AND GOING
ON STEAMER AL-KI . (
The Al-Ki arrive*! from the South i c
yesterday evening with the following J (
passengers for Juneau: Mrs. Marie ,
Blase, J. \V. Davis, Henry llokin, C. B. (
Allen. C. E. Drake, W. Butler, Louis |
Mai, H. C. Hungerford, W. Ruchog. J. j
W. Kilgore, M. Anderson, P. E. O'Brien t
J. Ferguson, C. Nelson, \V. Hark Ins. J. (
Jewells, J. Jackson, Nels Austad, Lee c
Jreini, James Dahl, J. M. Grant, E. 0. t
Clancy, W. Murry, Owcu Vale, S. W. r
Miller, Albert Elliott. W. Van Wych,
It. C. Adams, W. Weight, J. Bukerky, ?
Mrs. H. Thresderoft, and 17 second!
:lass.
Going South.
The following took passage on the 1
Al-Ki for the South last night: W.
ind child, Stanley J. Snow and wife. '
C. Stokes and wife, Mrs. H. P. Hanson 1
I. W. Jockson, F. D. Carter, G. W. '
Adams and wife, C. C. Davis, It. W.
Pepin. W. H. Barnhill, J. P. McCarthy. J
Mrs. S. A. Mess, O. R. Shotter, J. Zacli
Ison. Robert Walker, C. L. Glover and 1
16 second class.
I
WEI DELEICH CASE IS
STILL UNSETTLED
The case of Weldelelch against <
Townsend et al is still unsettled. For t
the second time the jury trying the i
:ase has failed of arriving at a ver- i
ilcL The first jury trying the case ]
stayed out thirty hours and was r
lischarged. The jury trying the case <
the second time was out 35 hours and f
was discharged about 9 o'clock last t
night. The matter was continued un
til Monday, pending efforts that are
being made by opposing counsel to
settle the matter out of court. The
tiction Involves title to land near the (
Chief Johnson house.
TEARING DOWN OLD
LOG CHURCH BUILDING .
The work of tearing down tho old (
log church building commenced this
morning. The site of this old land
mark will soon be occupied by a hand
some business structure to bo erected f
for the Eagle Brewing company,.of
which S. Zynda is tho head. I
PASSENGERS ARRIVING I
ON THE JEFFERSON |
The Jefferson, arriving from the :
South this morning brought the follow
ing passengers for Juneau: Capt. i
John Johnson, L. T. Caughlin, H. Kim
ball, Mrs. Stromberg, Mrs. Hanselman.
Mrs. Phillips, I. McDonald, F. Forosco,
G. R. Shuck, O. Buttonhoff, N. Dan- <
brick, Arthur Fox, Florence Tascher,
Allen Hulrn, Eben Johnson, P. E.
Swanson, J. Janscn, A. Oines, S. E.
Jeannet, D. J. Connolly, C. A. McCool,
M. S. Edmunsen, George Malof, Jas.
Kingston. J. T, I?aton, J. Hemra, J.
Zavcdsky, B. O. Isaacson, C. Dunham,
P. Hindvln, H. E. Chastain, and six
teen second class.
LEAVING FOR SKAGWAY
The Jefferson, leaving for Skagway
this afternoon took the following pas
sengers for Lynn canal: For Skagway
?S. H. Reynolds, H. J. Naughton, E.
L. Anderson, W. J. Connor, D. C. Mc
Donald, A. Baxter, John McLellnn, \V.
H. Ireland, M. Baker. A. C. Youmans,
A. Morris, Miss Eva Cole. Frank Bren
an. Archie McDonald. 3 second class;
For Haines?C. B. Williams.
FOR RENT?A modern flat of two
rooms. Fitted with bath and kitchen
range. Apply to A. M. Goodman, Al
askan Hotel, between 5 and 7 o'clock,
evenings. 3-20-tf.
WILSON TELLS HOW
BEING CHIEF SEEMS
WASHINGTON. March 21.?One of
the moat remarkable occurences that
ever took place In Washington was
that Inst night when President Wood
row Wilson described to the asaembled
members of-the National Press Club In
a long, frank and conversational talk
"how It feels to bo President." The
talk revealed tin Intimate picture of
Wilson, the man. With a breadth of
vision and lutellect so vast as to star
tle hlB auditors nt times there was dis
closed a sympathy, kindliness and hit
manliness that drew all those present
to him in a manner never before ex
perienced toward a President.
The speech of the President wns
made at the request of the club and
ivaB not intended to be reported or
made public," though those who heard
It sny that If It could be given to the
ivorld in such a way as to carry with
it tho impression that it made upon
tils hearers it could not fall to ndd to
:hc fame of the author.
ANDERSON PAYS FINE
A FEW DAYS AGO
Charles Anderson, arrested a few
lays ago by Capt. J. T. Martin, city
marshal, and given a trial on two
charges, one for using obscene lan
guage and the other for resisting an
officer, was adjudged guilty of both
>ffcnscs by Municipal Magistrate E.
tV. Petit, to whom he paid the fines <
mpos'd, yesterday afternoon. He was
?ror. ptly discharged. .
EXAMINATION FOR SKILLED
LABORER AT KETCHIKAN 1
?+?
\V. C. DIbrell, lighthouse inspector,
ias given notice that there will be a
?Ivll service examination at Ketchikan
March 30th for the position of skilled
aborer In the 10th Lighthouse Dis
rict, (Alaska.) Application blanks .
nay be secured from the lighthouse
nspector, Ketchikan.
2IG FORECLOSURE SUIT
IS BEING HEARD TODAY
The foreclosure proceedings In the
jase of Lewis Porter Hammond, tnis
ee for the Central Trust and Savings
:ompany against the Jualpa and Last
Chance properties In the Cold creek
ralley are belug heard In the District '
:ourt this morning. The total amount '
nvolvcd approximates $180,000. The '
Ylaska Gastineau Mining company in
erest8 hold bonds for which the pro
:eedlngs are brought and the marshal's
ale that follows will probably clear
lp the title to tfeaf laud. Z. R. Cheney J
epresents the plaintiff.
DATE OF CAUCUS MAY
BE SET MONDAY NIGHT
DOUGLAS. March 21.?At the meet
ng of the city council, which will be .
lcld .Monday evening it Is probable
hat the time will be set for holding
i public caucus for the purpose of
Meeting candidates for the municipal
)fficcs to be voted on April 2. No
nterest in local politics is being mani- '
ested at the prAent time, but it is
inticipaied that after the caucus some
ictlvity may be manifested.
DR. HECTOR AND FAMILY ?
LEAVING ON JEFFERSON
DOUGLAS, March 21.?Dr. De Pip
>rno R. Hector and family will leave
>n the south sailing of the Jefferson
or their new home in San Diego.after
i year's residence in Douglas. The
Doctor shipped his household goods on
i few days ago. His practice in this
:lty will be taken over by Dr. Mid
ord, who was formerly a resident of
his city.
TONIGHT AT THE ORPHEUM
?+?
"Broken Ways,"?A strong Biograph
Iranin.
"French Artillery Maneouvers."?A
nilitary picture by the Pathe Co.
"Four Days," and "The Discovery"
ire two good comedies, featuring John
Sunny and some of the Essany corne
lians.
Sunday and Monday's Program
Ab usual, a Btrong bill will be pre
sented. as follows:
"Pathe Weekly"?The best weekly
issued and always good.
"International Spies." A military
play, taken in England and France.
It shows how the spies make their
L'scape by securing the plans of the
mined field.
"The Ferrets." A romance of the
underworld by the Solig Co.
"Going Some." This is-an extreme
ly laughable comedy, based on an elec
tion bet and a picture that both Dem
ocrats and Republicans will enjoy, the
former because they won, and the
latter because they lost. It is a laugh
from start to finish and will be the
closing of a good show. Democrats,
show your Republican friends that you
are "Going Some."
SPRING AND SUMMER, 1914.
This is an invitation for you to call
and inspect the season's new designs,
the spring suitings and other fabrics
in the tailoring line.
It is an offer to furnish you with
clothes made in your own home town,
made by competent workmen; clothes
not made in Eastern sweatshops.
Cordially,
?3-4-tf. F. WOLLAND.
RUTH PRESTON. Teacher of piano.
138 Franklin. 3-19-tf
Typewriters for rent. See W. H.
Case. 3-17-tf.
Have some fun! Tickle tho Ivories
at Burford's 2-16-tf.
SEATTLE IS READY
FOR CELEBRATION
SEATTLE. March 21.?Seattle Is all
ready for the great celebration of the
passage of the Alaska railroad bill to
night. Gov. Ernest Lister, Mayor Hi
ram C. Gill, officers and members of
the Chamber of Commerce, the Arctic
Club and other organizations will par
ticipate In the celebration. There will
be a parade with many novel features,
a big bonfire and fireworks.
Sweepstakes Dance a Great Success.
SEATTLE, March 21.?The Sour
doughs' Alaska Sweepstakes ball at
Dreamland rink last night was a huge
success. The great house was filled
to overflowing. The proceeds will be
telegraphed to Nome today.
ALAMEDA IS COMING
WITH MANY PASSENGERS
SEATTLE, March 21.?The Alamcdn
sailed for Seattle last night with the
following passenger list for Juneau:
J. R. Jones, E. R. Jaeger, Henry
Cassles, Mrs. H. Davis, S. J. Ball, R.
O'Neill, C. R. Cook, William Robin
son, G. W. Runner, Frank McCoy, Miss
K. Walsh, Mrs. Llnnell, I. Anderson,
H. L. Wallenberg, M. O. i'eabody, G.
Sands, Theo. Mohr and wife, P. It.
Bradley, Mrs. G. Johnson, Mrs. lielina
Mattson. W. Winn and wife. B. Winn. '
Nick Mathicson, Christian Ransuin,
Mrs. A. Cordingly, Sain. Radovick, M.
Tomanovick. Frank Kunsisto and wife,
P. Nordanhurg. E. Henton, W. Iielnn
and wife, Miss I. Hclna, M. S. Sutton. t
F. F. Bush, Miss Sclma Selgfrled, Jack ,
Sey, Chns, R. Wade, C. A. Vangodcen,
and seventeen steerage.
ROYAL FRUIT COMPANY
OPENS ANOTHER STORE
' ?+?
James Protopapas, manager of the
Royal Fruit company this morning op
ened- a new retail store on lower ?
Franklin street. In the Hogan build
ing. Mr. Protopapas says that he will
continuo business both wholesale anil
retail, at his Seward street store, but
found It necessary on account of lack
of room to secure another store to han
rlle the growing trade.
CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 1
?+?
The Commercial Club celebration '
committee will meet in the office of
the C. W. Young company tomorrow
ifternoon at 2 o'clock.
I
C. D. GARFIELD'S NIECE WEDS
Special Deputy Collector of Cur- i
toms C. D. Carflald recently received
news of the marriage of his niece, i
Miss Ruth Church of Seattle, to Lieut.
O'Brien. of the United States army, i
Lieut, and Mrs. O'Brien left immed
iately for the Philippines, where Lieut.
O'Brien's regiment is stationed.
TAKU CANNERY CREW ARRIVES
?+?
W. O. Carlson, son of the head of j
the Taku Harbor cannery, with a crew i
of several men and supplies debarked :
nt Taku Harbor from the Jefferson on
the last trip up. t
LOUIS T. COUGHLIN HERE
Louis T. Coughlin. formerly a pop
ular purser on the Pacific Coast com- 1
pany lines arrived on the Jefferson 1
today to take the position of head i
wharfinger for the company at Ju
neau. He has established himself at
the Orpheum hotel.
REAL ESTATE BARGAINS.
tj*
Lot 8, Block 119, beautiful view for!|
residence. $800.00
Lot 4, Block 24; n fine corner for II
fin apartment building. $4,500.
Lot 2, Block 113 with house. A bar
?aln for $4,000.00.
Lots 7 and 8, Block 9. This Is one
of the best double corners In the city j:
One half of lot 2, block 9, Good lo-l
cation for offices. Fair building. 11
Lots 3 and 4. Block 0, with 3 Rood .
buildings.
Lot 5, Block 1. graded. Good busl- f
ncss location. |
One half Interest in lot 5. Block 4,
with good buildings.
Lots 21 and 22. Block 1, Pacific
Coast addition. Splendid business lo
cation.
I have some good bargains In water
front property.
You can arrange terms on all of the;
above.
Ciill at Juneau Iron Works, Phone.
3-4.
NO CHINA EGGS
?+?
but guaranteed strictly fresh. FRESH
SEATTLE QUEEN BUTTER. 30 cents j
per pound at the Royal Fruit company
leading dealers in fresh fruits and |
vegetables and the company which re- J
duces the cost of living. Free delivery. I
Phone 280. tf. j
Mothers.
We carry in stock a complete line
of baby foods, toilet and nursery nec
essities. Telephone us your smallest
wants. Phone 3.
3-21-tf. DORAN'S DRUG STORE.
FAMILY BOARD for acceptable par
ties?Apply by letter "F" Empire of
fice. * 3-21-tf.
FOR RENT.?A modern four-room
furnished flat. See Mrs. J. C. Houli
hnn at St. George Hotel or Phone
G04. 3-21-36.
Stanley J. Snow and wife, who have
engaged In business in Juneau took
passage on the Al-Kl for tho States.
The surprise of the 20th century Is
due to arrive In Juneau in. 11 days.
PRESIDENT WILSON 1
CAN'T COME NORTH
WASHINGTON. March 21? Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson let it be known
today that It will be Impossible for
him to visit Alnska this year. He has
been Invited by various Alaska organi
zations and by Alaskans who have
called upon him to visit the Territory
so frequently that he felt that he
should make this statement, though,
he said, lie would greatly like to see
the Territory and to meet the people '
there.
ANOTHER COLD WAVE
SWEEPS OVER COUNTRY
WASHINGTON, March 21?Anoth- \
er cold wave is sweeping over the (
country. It is Intensely cold at all (
points east of the Rocky mountains. .
The weather bureau forcasts that it |
will continue so for several days.
rACOMA INTERURBAN
IS ROBBED AGAIN
?t? f
SEATTLE, March 21.?Tho Tacoma <
Interurban train was held up at. the t
south side of Station One last night
ind robbed. The robbers escaped.
Boy Holds Up Schooner. I
SEATTLE, .March 21?Harold Wells t
x masked boy aged 20 years, held up n
ind robbed the crew of the Bering '
Sea cod fishing cruiser Fanny Dutard,
which was lying at the pier. Wells
was arrested as soon as he came on
shore. <
? ? 1
MEW YORK SUN TO (
HAVE NEW BUILDING 1
?4>? t
NEW YORK. March 21?Tho New
S'ork Sun newspaper is said to be '
lbont to begin the erection of an 18
itory office building on the site of
:he present Sun building.
t ( t i
NEW YORK PEACH 1
CROP IS RUINED J
NEW YORK. March 20.?Reports 1
from the big peach district of central
New York are that the peach crop
lias been practically ruined by tho re
cent zero weather. It Is estimated
thnt 75r/f of the trees have been dam
aged. ^
CONVICTED WESTERN FUEL
MEN ARE SENTENCED 1
SAN FRANCISCO, March 20.?Vice- '
President Smith and Superintendent !
Mills, of the Western Fuel Company. (
convicted of conspiracy to defraud the
government of money due for duty on
coal, were this morning sentenced to '
erve one year and a half at hard la
bor each, in the San Qucntln peniten
tiary. Meigher Mayer was given one
year in the County jail.
? ? ? I
SEATTLE PIONEER DIES.
SEATTLE, March 21? Charles F. ,
Clancy, a pioneer liveryman and broth
er of Frank and John Clancy, of this '
city, died today of concussion of tho
brain.
ViCTIM OF HOONAH
STABBING AFFRAY HERE \
Joe Edwards, of Hoonah, who is em- J
ployed with the Hoonah Packing com
pany was the victim of a stabbing af
[ray last Thursday and was brought j
>o the St. Ann's Hospital in Juneau
yesterday. The weapon entered the
back between the ribs and inflicted a '
very painful wound. Mrs. Edwards
accompanied her husband to Juneau,
rhis afternoon .Mr. Edwards is report
d to he resting easy. Mrs. Edwards s
[leclincd to make any statement as to '
the cause of the difficulty or the iden- f
tity of the party who attacked her bus- I
band.
? ? ? I
* *
I
MARINE NOTES
I I -
-!? 1 ]
The Northwestern left Valdcz this |
morning at 9 o'clock and should arrive ,
in Juneau early Monday.
The Jefferson, returning from Skag
way should sail south about noon to
morrow.
The Alameda, sailing from Seattle
last night should arrive in Juneau
Monday night.
The Georgia will sail for Skagway
tomorrow morning at 2 o'clock.
The Humboldt will be due to arrive
from the South, March 26.
The Admiral Evans will be due to
arrive from the South, March 28.
The Al-Ki arrived from tho South
yesterday evening and sailed on tho 1
return trip this morning.
The Swan lino freighter Rochelle
arrived front Seattle last night.
MASONS. ATTENTION.
Stated communication of Mt. Juneau
Imdge, No. 147, F. & A. M., Monday
evening, March ?23, eight o'clock. Odd
Fellows Hall. Work in the F. C. de
gree. Sojourning brethren cordially
invited.
? E. D. BEATTIE, Sec'y. 3-21-2t.
Capt. John Johnston was a return
ing passenger on the Jefferson from
the States. He expects to remain in
Juneau for several weeks.
Henry Malone and Mrs. Malonc are
enroutc to San Diego aboard the Ad
miral Evans.
Every nation welcome, except Cnrrie.
at the Stampede. 2-19-tf
England Sends Troops
To North Ireland
+
I
ULSTER WAR BEGINS.
LONDON, March 21.? The
war In Ulster Is on. The first
blood has been shed. A soldier
entering Carragh camp was shot
this afternoon. .He is hailed as
the first victim of the revolt.
London Is preparing for trou
ble. It Is estimated that 80,000
Ulstcrmen will rise against home
rule.
i- +
LONDON. March 21.?The govern
ment has'begun to place regular troops
n North Ireland In sufficient strength
'.o deal with any situation that might
irise. The Prime Minister announced
hat the troops are not being sent to
:oerce, but to maintain order and es
tablish peace in the event that any ef
fort is made to break It. "The United
Kingdom will be governed under the
law," lie said.
Three Thousand Troops In Ulster
BELFAST, March 21.?Three thou
land troops with machine guns and
ither accoutrement have arrived at
he various towns in Ulster.
Troops Going to Ireland Mutiny.
LONDON, March 21?Two compan
es of a Dorcetshire regiment stationed
it Belfast mutinied this morning. A
lergeant, explaining the action, said
'We will have no home rule here."
Army Officers Resign.
DUBLIN. March 21.?Many of the
jfficers of the 16th Lancers and 4th
Iussars, ordered to Ulster, have ten
lered their resignations from the
irmy. It is believed that the order to
ransfer the troops will be cancelled.
SENATOR JONES AFTER
TOLLS INFORMATION
WASHINGTON, March 21.?Senator
tVesley L. Jones today Introduced a
?esolution call Inn on the President to
mme (he Nations protesting against
he tolls exemption clause. It was re- ?
erred to the foreign relations com
mittee.
30VERNMENT TO RETIRE
FROM REINDEER BUSINESS
WASHINGTON, March 21? The
Federal government plans to go out of
he reindeer business In Alaska as
'ast as It can train Alaskans for In
lividual ownership. The reason for
his Is especially to encourage inde
pendence among the Natives, accord
ng to a statement given out by the
joard of education today.
'RESIDENT WILSON NAMES
STATE DEPARTMENT MEN
?>f?
WASHINGTON, March 21? Presi
lent Woodrow Wilson yesterday nom
inated Robert I.anslng, of Watertown,
N. Y? to be counsellor of the State
Department, and Cone Johnson, of
Texas, to bo solicitor of the Depart
ment
More Honors For Goethals.
WASHINGTON, March 21?Secre
ary of War Lindley M. Garrison has
mnounced the appointment of Col. G.
^V. Goethals, Governor of the Panama
'anal zone,'to be head of the depart
ment of operation and maintenance,
ind Henry Hodges to be engineer of
;he maintenance department of the
Panama canal zone.
INSANE FORT GIBBON
MAN SHOOTS COMRADE
?4*?-*
FAIRBANKS, March 21.?While on
sentry duty yesterday at Fort Gibbon
Private bowman went violently In
sane and shot Private Steelman twice
put not fatally.
PROVIDENCE MAY HAVE
A SUBWAY SYSTEM
-4?
PROVIDENCE, R. I., March 21.?
A plan for a system of subwayB In
Providence has been presented to the
board of aldermen. The cost Is esti
mated to be $13,000,000.
FRENCH COMMITTEE PROBING
FORMER CABINET OFFICERS
PARIS, March 21.?Cnillaux and
Monis, recently resigned from the ca
binet and both former premiers of
France, were questioned last night by
a Parliamentary investigation commit
tee why they hindered the trial of
Henry Rochette, the fugitive banker,
who defrauded Investors of millions.
COMMITTEE FAVORS MINE
EXPERIMENTAL STATIONS
WASHINGTON, March 21.? The
House committee on mines has report
ed favorably the Taylor bill creating
10 mining experiment stations. One
of them is to be located in Alaska.
Each station Is allowed $25,000 annu
ally.
WANTED?A two-room cabin, fur
nished or unfurnished. Phone Hotel
Cain. Room 305. 3-21-26.
George R. Shotter, of Hoonah, left
on the AI-KI for the South.
Miss Eva Cole took passage on the
Jefferson this afternoon.
Royal typewriters. See W. H. Case.
?3-17-tf.
You'll find the cosmopolitan crowd
at the Stampede. 2-19-tf.

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