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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 04, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. ML NO. 424. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, APRIL -1, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Gen. Villa is Sole
Hero of Torreon
TORREON, April 4.?Gen. Villa Is
the single hero of the battle at this
place. Had he not been In absolute
command, the Constitutionalist at
tacking force would have fled at the
first repulse. He fairly forced his men
back to the fight and kept them at it
almost day and night until the end.
Hero la Modest
When the newspaper correspondents
today asked Gen. Villa for a statement ;
he said:
"Tell the public that after eleven
days' fighting, the Federals evacuated
Torreon, leaving their dead and wound
ed behind. That is all."
Villa Takes Command.
JUAREZ. Mex., April 4.?It is an
nounced officially today that Gen. Vil
la has left Torreon to take charge of
troops at San Pedro which has been
attacked by Federalists who have fled j
from Torreon.
SEWARD SOCIETY ELECTS
ANOTHER SET OF OFFICERS!
The Seward Society, the Juneau
High School organization yesterday
afternoon elected the following offi
cers for the ensuing term:
Walno Headrickson, president; Cy
ril Kashaveroff. vice-president; Miss
Gladys Tripp. Secretary; Burdette
Winn, treasurer: William Peterson,
attorney-general, aud Harry' Sabin,
marshal.
The meeting was short, and only
business matters transacted.
ANOTHER LAWYER THINKS
VERY WELL OF JUNEAU
Harry Smith, formerly a practicing
lawyer of Tacorna. who has been in
Juneau for some time since returning
from the Chisana via Whitehorse. will
locate in this city. He thinks the out
look in Juneau superior to that of any
city in the West Mr. Smith is at the
Occidental Hotel.
NEW PICTURES TONIGHT
AT ORPHEUM THEATRE
"The Maoris of New Zealand" is a
picture of life in New Zealand as lived
by the original natives of the Island.
?The Maoris.
"Belinda"?The story, or plot and
counterplot is a comedy by the Vita
graph Co.. with Norma Talmage as
"Belinda" and is the first of the "Bel
inda" series.
"The Broken Idyll" is a pretty story
story of ranch life.
"Unprofitable Boarders" is a good
comedy by the Edison Co.
Sunday and Monday.
The following strong bill will be
presented:
"Pathe Weekly."
"Ann." A strong drama featuring
Mable Trummelle with the Edison Co.
"Innocence" and a roaring comedy
making a strong show.
START SKAGWAY WAGON
ROAD MAY THIS YEAR
According to advices just received,
the preliminary survey for the propos
ed government wagon road from Skag
wcy to the Canadian boundary line at
the summit of White Pass will be
made in May of this year. District
Attorney John Rustgard has just re
ceived a letter from the office of the
Attorney-General, stating that a con
ference had been held between Dele
gate Wlckersham. and Col. W. P. Rich
ardson. of the road commission, and
the Attorney General's office in which
it was planned to go ahead with the
work. As soon as the survey is made
the White Pass people will be called
upon to relinquish their title to the
old wagon road franchise and right of
way.
The Skagway road is planned to con
nect with a wagon road on the Canad
ian side of the line, leading to Lake
Bennett and to Whltehorse. The Can
adians are also discussing the plan of
building an automobile road, reaching
all the way to Dawson.
JEFFERSON TAKES
MANY SOUTHWARD
???
The Jefferson, leaving for the south
yesterday evening, took the following
from Juneau: For Seattle?Mrs. L.
DeGroff. Miss A. Vanderbilt, E. Davel
er and wife. H. D. Manning. Felix John
son. J. R. McKay. Miss Nina Jorgen
sen. A. Carroll. Miss Hall. Fred Les
ter. Helen Lester, J. E. McDermott.
W. E. Greer and wife. William Glen
denning: For Ketchikan?F. H. Han
son. H. Elster, T. Mancaran. J. F. Pugh
Marian D. Ridley, Mrs. A. Olson. Mrs.
Murray. R. L. Schmidt. S. J. Ball: For
Wrangell?O. L. Peterson.
NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS.
Having no lease on the premises
I occupy, the landlord raised my rent
to a prohibitive figure and I was com
pelled to vacate. By calling Phone
2-4-2 all my customers will have their
clothes taken care of.
D. M. BOTHWELL. 4-3-2t.
Every nation welcome, except Carrie,
at the Stampede. 2-19-tf
Augustine & Kyer chocolates. 75
cents and $1 a pound; always fresh;
weekly shipments from Seattle. Ju
neau Drug Co. Phone 250. Imme
diate delivery. 4-3-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?59.
Minimum?36.
Clear.
McBRIDE PROMISES
GOOD STRONG TEAM
Chairman J. C. McBride, of the Ju
[ nettu Baseball Board of Managers,
announced this morning that the
board had decided nt a meeting last
night that there would be one good
strong team maintained throughout
the season of 1914. He also stated
that several good players are now j
being negotiated for, and that the |
board had other good players in mind
which if secured, would placo Juneau!
in good condition to contend for base
ball honors during the coming season. |
It is expected that further announce-!
ments as to the personnel of the team
will be made soon. The Board of Man
agers is very well satisfied with the
present outlook according to Mr. Mc
Bride. and everything is running
along smoothly.
Thirty-two men are working on the J
new base ball grounds in Thane park,!
l^ast Chance basin, under the direc
tion of H. T. Tripp, and good progress!
is being made.
BUSY WEEK AHEAD
FOR PRESBYTERIANS
The annua! meeting of the Presby
tery of Alaska will convene Monday
morning at nine o'clock in the Pres-:
byterlan church.
The Presbytery will open with de
votional excises, to which the public'
is invited. At 9:30 the Presbytery
will be formally constituted, a new
moderator and other temporary and
permanent officers elected.
Monday evening there will be a
popular service in the Native church
presided over by Rev. Edward Mars-;
den, of Saxmnn. The address will be
given by Rev. George J. Beck, of Kake. |
Subject of the address: "The Spirit-1
ual Life."
Tuesday evening there will be a
popular service in the Presbyterian
church at eight o'clock. Rev. Mars
den will speak at this service on the
subject "Evidences of Christianity
among the Native Peoples." Rev.
Waggoner, of Klawock, will also ad
dress the meeting from the theme:
"Phases and Problems of the Native
Work."
There will be a reception at the
Manse this evening to which both the
members of the Presbytery and the
congregation are invited.
THE PORTAL CAMP AT
SHEEP CREEK ABANDONED
The Portal Camp at Sheep Creek
has been abandoned since the com
pletion of the tunnel, and Paddy
O'Xell, who had complete charge of
the tunnel crews and many of his men.
will take a well earned vacation. Mr.
O'Neil will travel for two months at
the expense of the Alaska Gastineau
Mining company. Those of the crew
who desire to continue work will be
absorbed in other crews and be es
tablished at some of the other camps
of the company near at hand.
PORTLAND BUSINESS
MEN COMING NORTH
A letter received by one of Juneau's
business men, from the Portland
Chamber of Commerce states that
some of the prominent business inen
of Portland, accompanied by tho chair
man of the Chamber of Commerce's
Alaskan committee. W. G. McPhersou,
I will come up to Juneau on one of the
I boats leaving there soon.
MRS. STEVENS WITHDRAWS
FROM SCHOOL CONTEST
At the request of the trustees of
the Presbyterian church, Mrs. John
B. Stevens, wife of the pastor of the
Presbyterian church this morning
I withdrew from the contest for mem
I bership of the school board.
Mrs. Stevens, when interviewed con
cerning her withdrawal, stated that
she would have been pleased to ac
cept the position if elected, and re
grets the loss of a possible opportun
ity of public trust and service?but
that the trustees of the church deemed
It Inadvisable.
Mrs. Stevens had been endorsed for
the school board by the Draper Club,
and a campaign In her behalf was
well underway when the trustees of
the church requested that she with
draw. She deferred to their judgment
and retired.
DR. KEM.PTHORNE AT TRINITY
Rev. Mr. Kempthorne will preach In
Trinity Episcopal church tomorrow ev
ening at 8 p. m. Everyone is cordially
welcome. There will be special music,
including Offertory solo by Miss Crys
tal Snow.
MASONS ATTENTION.
Called communication of Mt. Juneau
lodge. No. 147, F. & A. M., will be held
Monday evening. April 6th, eight
o'clock, at Odd Fellows' Hall. Work
in the M. M. degree. By order W. M.
Sojourning brethren cordially invit
ed.
E. D. BEATTIE, Secy.
Mothers.
We carry in stock a complete line
of baby foods, toilet and nursery nec
essities. Telephone us your smallest
wants. Phone 3.
3-21-tf. DORAN'S DRUG STORE.
FOR RENT. Three room cabin. Part
ly furnished. Call phone 3483. 4-3-3t
PIONEER CROSSES
THE GREAT DIVIDE
Col. William Winn Is dead. Tho end
canto suddenly at 5 o'clock yesterday
afternoon at the family home and has
caused a distinct shock throughout the
community. Col. Winn was 60 years
of age and apparently In the best of
health. Those who saw him on the
street earllor In the day remarked
that he was looking better than usu
al. Heart disease Is assigned as the
immediate cause of death. For tho
, past two years he was not considered
strong and the winters have been
spent In the milder climate of Cali
fornia. Recently Col. Winn, Mrs. Winn
and their son Burdetto returned to
Juneau from spending the winter
I there.
Besides his devoted wife, deceased
leaves four sons, John, Milton. Grav
er C.. and Burdctte, the latter of
whom was born In Juneau, and a
brother James, also a resident of Ju
neau and a brother and . sister in Wis
consin.
Col. Winn was one of the earliest
settlers of Juneau, arriving here In
1889, with Mrs. Winn and their three
small boys, John, Milton, and Grover
C., all of whom grew to manhood in
Juneau and became identified with
the community's interests.
Coming from Wiota, Wisconsin,
when Juneau was but a straggling vil
lage, Col. Winn with the prescient oye
of a prophet, looked to the future and
determined to make the place his
home. He engaged in business for, a
number of years and acquired i
erable property in what is <n the
best part of the business section of
town as well as mining interests. He
has always been active in the com
munity's affairs and his sons were
trained with the idea of seeking their
own good through the good of others.
Col. Winn's funeral will be held to
morrow at 2:30 o'clock from the Pres
byterian church. Interment will be In
Evergreen cemetery.
BURGLARY WAS NOT
COMMITTED INTENTIONALLY
~ -
U. S. Commissioner J. B. Marshall
dismissed the complaint of burglary
against John Christenson and dis
charged the prisoner from custody on
his promise to pay and repair the dam
age dono to property by his unlawful
acts. The evidence submitted, tended
to show that the prisoner, who broke
into the office of the Surveyor Gener
al and wrecked a typewriter, besides
doing other damage, and walked off
with a box of cigars and other arti
cles, had no criminal intent and did
not realize what he was doing.
JAPANESE RESIDENTS ARE
REGISTERED FOR ELECTION
?+?
George Hoshizaki and E. Ishhoon,
Japancso tenants of E. Valentine, and
connected with a local laundry, have
registered for the forthcoming muni
cipal election. They each had first
citizenship papers issued several years
ago. It is said that their votes will
be challenged If offered on election
day. The first named registered March
14 and the other March 24.
During the past 48 hours, there has
been a heavy registration, up to last
night. 890 names being recorded by
the registration office. This number
has been materially increased during
the business hours of today and it is
probable that when the books are
| closed at 5 o'clock this afternoon the
1300 mark will have been comfortably
| passed.
COURT HOUSE BRIEFS.
?+?
D. A. Epstoyn, assignee has filed
suit against T. \V. and Alfred Eggen.
of Douglas to recover $228.90 alleged
to be balance due for goods furnished
to John B. Stevens & Co., of Tacoma.
Manuel Sonano was this morning
bound over by U. S. Commissioner
J. B. Marshall on tho charge of selling
liquor to Indians. In default of bail
he is in jail.
Fastest service on earth?Lightning.
Stampede.
ROOM SET ASIDE
EOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
The large auditorium on the Soutl
or East Bide of 'he second floor o
the City Hall building, which at th<
present time Is divided by a tempor
ary partition wall into two schoo
rooms, will become the home gf th(
new city library, If the action takei
at last night's meeting prevails. Coun
oilman W. H. Case spoke of the ef
forts of tho Draper Society of Juueat
to establish a public library In the cltj
and Introduced a resolution commit
ting the City Council to tho plan o
turning this portion of the bulldlm
over to the library as soon us It cai
be relieved from its preBont use. Ir
llko manner the other half of tho sec
oud floor Ib to become the dormltorj
and club room Tor members of tin
Juneau fire department. The rcsolu
tions making this disposition of thai
portion of tho building received th<
unanimous support of nil the mem
hers present.
The greater part of last night's ses
sion was taken up with the auditing
of accounts and small routine mattori
that wore left over from prevlouf
meetings.
Just DOIore adjournment, .MUvur v
\V. Carter reviewed in brief the wort
of tho present Council and paid glow
ing tributes to the heads of each ol
the standing committees for tho ex
eel lent manner In which they had con
ducted the burdens lnid upon their
and commended them warmly for tht
patriotic sacrifice of personal Inter
cats for the general good.
Councilman J. B. Marshall addressed
tho body at the close of Mayor Car
ter's remarks, speaking particular!)
of the injustice that was being done
the C. W. Young Co., and Mayor Car
ter through the circulation of erron
eous reports with especial reference
| to the meeting of the Council at whicli
, bids were opened for the plumbing
land heating plant of the city hal
building. He read from the recordt
the names of those present; the bldt
that were received and told in dotal:
how the specifications were made more
! clear and definite at the request ol
certain bidders cm the work. Tho C
; W. Young Co. bid was shown to b<
I ?1692 less than the highest bid and
(?975 less than tho next lowest bid
There were five members present
land each of them.voted to award the
i contract to the C. W. Young Co.
The Council will not meet again un
I til after the election whldh occurs
. next Tuesday.
CASEY IS TO RUN
EOR SCHOOL BOARD
?* <*** -|- *
Friends of W. W. Casey induced hirr
to become a candidate for member ol
the school board today, after the an
nouncement of the withdrawal of Mrs
John B. Stevens was made public.
Mr. Casey was a member of the first
school board In Juneau and served a:
such for several years. He was t
member of the board at the time th<
old school house was built, and is re
garded by the old-time residents o
Juneau as one of the best school di
rectors that ever served in the city
ALASKAN HOTEL ARRIVALS
i The following arrivals are reg
1 istered at the Alaskan Hotel: C. E
| Merritt and wife, Ketchikan: B. A
Russell, P. E. Jackson. J. E. George
City: C. K. Dye, Portland; R. E. Chas
tain, Tacoma; B. F. Watson, Alaska
The Tavern will serve Ice crean
[Saturdays and Sundays from 12 nooi
| to S p. m. Family trade will recoivi
attention on phone orders to the Hotc
j Cain. 4-3-2t.
B. M. Bohrends Co. announce the ar
rival of their complete line of Wool
tex coats and suits. 4-3-2t
? ? ?
Good cook, strons woman, want:
, position In mlnlnR camp. Waitress al
| so want3 position in camp. S. Sumi, F
?O. Box 101. 3-30-6t.
TAX DODGERS
Extract from the Minutes of the Council
sitting as a Board of Equalization on June 9,1913:
"E. Valentine appeared in person and as
the agent of Mrs. Lillian Irwin and asks that a
reduction be made on Mrs. Irwin's property as
part of same was outside the incorporate limits
of Juneau."
"Also asks reduction on valuation of $2,000
on Lot 3, in Block-3."
The taxes mentioned in the last paragraph
amount to $40.00. In addition to this Mr. Val
entine owes $730.00 in taxes on other properly.
He made no objection to the assessment except
on one piece of property as above shown, and
can not now complain. But he does refuse to
pay his taxes and has not paid them. In most
of the States men who refuse to pay their taxes
ARE DENIED BY LAW THE RIGHT TO HOLD
OFFICE.
(Advertisement.)
CHINA BOY KILLS
' VANCOUVER WOMAN
i VANCOUVER. B. G\, April 4.?Mrs.
f Millard, wife of Charles J., chief tick
i ct agent for the Canadian Pacific here.
? was murdered and her body was burn
1 ed in the furnace of her home. Jack
3 King, a Chinese servant, aged 17 years
i confessed that ho committed the crime
? during the absence of the dead wo
? man's husband. He had been out of
i the city for two dnys.
- WICKERSHAM ADVOCATES
f FISHERIES LEGISLATION
> ?t?
' WASHINGTON, April 4.?Delegate
1 James Wickorsham, of Alaska, told the
' House Committeo on Territories that
' the world's supply of salmon would be
- ruined if the fishing methods that prc
' vail in Alaska were extended to tho
1 other Pacific coast districts. He advo-,
' cated the passage of a bill regulating;
"fthe fisheries.
-?? ? T * fct?*^*1 r- > i
? LONDON CITIZENS PROTEST
? AGAINST ULSTER COERCION
' LONDON, April 4.? One hundredj
thousand people assembled in Hydej
' park today to protest against the co-j
' arclon of Ulster. Fourteen meetings
' were held. They were addressed by
Peers and members of Parliament.
. . .
WELL KNOWN FAIRBANKS
LAWYER PASSES AWAY
FAIRBANKS, April 4.?J. C. Kellutn.
I a well known lawyer, mining operator;
and citizen of this city, died here yes
, terday.
. GRANDDAUGHTER
GETS HIGH HONORS
i JACKSONVILLE, Fia., April 4.
; Gen. Bennett H. Young, commander
I In-chief of the United Confederate Vet
i erans Association, has selected Miss
i ('urine Hampton, of Columbia, S. C..
I granddaughter of the late Senator
t Wade Hampton, of South Carolina, a
f Lieutenant-General of the Army of the
. Confederacy, to be chief sponsor for
? the Confederacy at the coming meet-1
I ing of the old soldiers of the south at
. this city.
? FARM WAGES MOVED
UPWARD DURING YEAR
1 WASHINGTON. April 4?The up
ward tendency of farm wages has
been noticeable in many sections of
the country during the last year. The
average increase, taking the country j
as a whole, has been two and one-half J
| per cent.
GERMANY DISTRIMINATES
! AGAINST STANDARD OIL
BERLIN. April 1.?It Is frankly ad-l
mitted by the German War Minister;
t that the German government is dis- j
criminating against American petrol
eum if it Is the product of t^ie Stand-1
ard Oil company, or Its affiliated con
cerns. This admission was made to.
f the American Chamber of Commerce:
at Berlin, which had protested against
the discrimination against American!
oil to the Chancellor.
I INSURANCE HEAD GETS
MUCH COMPANY MONEY
* -
SAN FRANCISCO, April 4.?Charg-|
. <'s that E. F. Green, former president;
. of the Pacific Coast Casualty company'
- embezzled $30,000 from the company
. were made to the district attorney's!
office last night by the State insur
i ancc commissioner.
B TWO TICKETS IN
1 FIELD AT SKAGWAY
Two municipal tlckctB arc In the
field at Skagway. The Taxpayers'
!? party, which has controlled municipal
affairs for the last four years, nom
inated Senator J. M. Tanner, Henry
b Friedenthal, Oscar Sclmcr, James Ken
I- uedy, A. 0. Blanchard, William Bat
?. son and George Ma pee.
The Nonpartisan Union convention,
" composed largely of women, last even
? Ing endorsed Kennedy, Blanchard,
! natsou and Magce and nominated Wll
; lard R. Hlllery, Howard Ashley and
! J. Hardy to oppose Tanner, Frieden
| thai and Selmar.
Dan McKay is the nominee for
j school clerk.
.% !
* !
MARINE NOTES
: [ jj
j The City of Seattle is expected In
? Juneau about 6 o'clock.
] The Humboldt, should arrive from
? the south Monday night or Tuesday
] morning.
The Admiral Sampson Is scheduled
to sail from Seattle tomorrow.
The Admiral Evans sailed for the
! Westward this morning.
; The Jefferson sailed for Seattle yes
. terday evening.
; The Georgia returned from Skag
' way today.
Marcus Stroud has accepted the po
\ sitlon as messenger at the cable of
? fice formerly held by W. S. Martin.
] Our good name on the label; our
? good quality in the package. Juneau
] j Drug Co., Opposite Alaskan Hotel.
.J Phone 260. Immediate delivery. 4-3-tf.
RUTH PRESTON, Teacher of piano.
:: 138 Franklin. 3-19-tf
Royal typewriters. See W. H. Case.
;; ?3-17-tf.
;; LADIES HAIR GOODS, remodeling
" of switches, puffs, etc., In modish
|| styles at "The Vogue Shop". Opp.
? Orpheum Theatre. Mrs. Albert Berry.
[ 3-20-Tues. Thu, Sat
CREDIT IS DUE
TO PRESIDENT
SEATTLE, April 4?Will H. Parry!
who had chnrgc of the Alaska bureau'8'
exhibit at Washington during the Al
aska railroad fight, said, in the course
of a report on the work of the com
mittee:
Our chief dependence nnd strength
throughout the fight was the friend
ship of President Wodrow Wilson and j
Secretary of Interior Franklin K. Lane. J
And, Charles (5. Helfner, be Is said to'(
his credit, is the man who, above all!
others, enlisted the support of the |
President. He brought his attention to I
the proposition before the Baltimore 11
convention.
f 1!!
NOME SWEEPSTAKES RACE
POSTPONED UNTIL 13TH
_____ '
NOME, April 4.?The Nome
sweepstakes race was postponed
today until April 13th, on oc- ;
count of the melting of the snow.
I ?
MILLIONAIRE LUMBERMAN
DIES IN CALIFORNIA 1
PASSADENA, April 4.?Frederick :
Weyerhnuser, the millionaire Wlscon
in and Washington and Oregon lum- '
b( rinan died here this morning.
MURPHY HOES NOT MEET *
COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
NEW YORK, April 4.?Charles F. J
Murphy admitted today that he did |
iot meet Chairman William Church ,
.(shorn, of the Democratic State Cen- ,
tral Committee, or Gov. Martin H. ,
Glynn at the recent meeting of the
committee at Albany. He entered the!
committee room and took a seat in tlio |,
second row from the rear, and hurried ]
away as soon as the meeting was over.' (
His sole participation in the meeting!
was to clap his hands with the others
after Gov. Glynn completed his speech
and again after Chairman Osborn
spoke.
Explaining his failure to participate
in the proceedings of the committee
Mr. Murphey said:. "I am merely a;
member of the committee."
, |
RAILROAD RATES TO
BE RAISED JUNE 11
|
NEW YORK, April 4.?The New ?
York American, after a canvass of the
Interstate Commerce commissioners,
says the freight rate decision will be
handed down not later than June 1,
and that it will be favorable to the
railroads.
PANAMA WANTS TO
BORROW $10,000,000
BERLIN, April 4.?A delegate from
the Panama government has arrived in
Berlin to endeavor to float a loan of
^10,000,000 secured by mineral and
township grants. It is said financiers
of Paris and London refused to enter
into the project, on the ground that
the United States might interpose a
veto.
HELEN CUD AH Y IS
MODERN, NOT NEW
NEW YORK, April 4.?Miss Helen
Cudahy, daughter of Patrick Cudaliy,
the Chicago and Milwaukee million
aire, who entered a training school
? or nurses at Boston, says:
"1 believe any girl, regardless of her
family's wealth or position, should be
able to earn her own living. Nursing
appeals to mo, and though I may nev
r work for pay, I do propose to know
how. 1 am not a suffragette, I merely!
renlizo that the world today requires
more of us girls than it did of our
mothers. 1 am not a new woman, on
ly a modern one, that's all."
Miss Cudahy's father, who rose to
a multl-mlllionalie packer from a poor
boyhood, is proud of her independ
ence.
TWO OLD PEOPLE DIE
OF EXCESSIVE FRIGHT:
WORCESTER, Mass., April 4.?Pat
rick Engleton, aged 80, and Mrs. Den
is Arseneult, aged 60, both dropped
dead yesterday from excessive fright
as they witnessed a fight between a
chauffeur and two clerks.
FOR SALE OR LEASE.
Will SELL or LJ3ASE lot In PACIF
| IC COAST ADDITION on very reason
able terms. 50 x 100 feet. A fine lo
cation for APARTMENT or BOARD
; INC. HOUSE. Address "R" Empire.
3-28-tf.
SPRING AND SUMMER, 1914.
This is an Invitation for you to call
and inspect the season's new designs,
the spring suitings and other fabrics |
! in the tailoring line.
I It Is an offer to furnish you withj
j clothes made in your own home town,
made by competent workmen; clothes
: not made in Eastern sweatshops.
Cordially,
I -3-4-tf. F. WOLLAND.
When hungry, hit tho trail for the
I Stampede, cor. Front and Franklin.
I 2-12-tf. j
Senator Millard's Mine
Richer Than The Cliff
VALDEZ, April 4.?The result of
the first clean-up of the Granite Gold
.Mining company demonstrates that
mine to be richer than the famous
Cliff. Superintendent Ray Millard
brought the returns from 12 days' run
Into town last night. There was more
than 34 pounds of gold. Sixty tons of
ore are on the dump and it Is worth
$1,000 a ton.
Senator B. F. Millard, of Valdez, Jaf
et Llndebcrg, of Nome, and J. E. Chll
berg, of Seattle, are the principle own
ers of the property.
GOETHALS WOULD NOT
RUN FOR PRESIDENT
NEW YORK, April 4.?It is learned
here through reliable authority that
Col. George W. Goethals said before
leaving for Panama that he pos
itively would not under any circum
stance accept the Progressive nomin
ation either for President or for Gov
ernor of New York.
WESTERN UNION CUTS
OUT BUCKET SHOPS
NEW YORK, April 4.?Vlce-PresI
Jent Brooks, of the Western Union,
referring to the negotiations for a new
wire contract with the New York
Stock Exchange, says, "We will cancel
my contract for a leased wire if the
Stock Exchange will show us that it
Is being used for a bucket shop or
other Illegal purposes."
PUBLICITY FOR
RAILWAY FINANCING
NEW YORK, April 4.?The House
Commerce committee has drafted a
bill, to be incorporated in the anti
trust program, providing that all mon
>y borrowed, earned, paid and spent,
sha.ll be accounted for to the Inter
state Commerce Commission by rail
roads, and that the commission may
regularly make public facts so se
cured.
GUGGENHEIMS OPENING
CHILEAN COPPER MINE
NEW YORK, April 4.?Daniel Gug
genheim. president of the Chile Cop
per Co., says American capital is trans
forming a Chilean desert into a great
mining camp. The plant will cost
in,500.000. The mine Is estimated to
contain 20,000,000 tons of ore. The
plant is expected to be in operation In
March, 7915.
WESTINGHOUSE LEFT
ESTATE WORTH $35,000,000
NEW YORK, April 4.?The value of
the estate of the late George Westing
house Is said to be about $35,000,000.
BUSCH'S PERSONAL PROPERTY
VALUED AT $17,000,000
?+?
ST. LOUIS. Mo., April 4.?The in
ventory of the estate of Adolphus
Busch lists personal property aggre
gating $17,000,000. The real estate is
not yet listed.
REFINED SUGAR REACHES
LOWEST PRICE IN HISTORY
BOSTON, April 4.?Refined sugar
is now at the lowest price in the his
tory of the country. The consumer
can buy it at an average price of 3V6
pounds for 15 cents, which is about
one cent a pound less than under nor
mal conditions. The tariff is given
responsibility for the cut.
TOBACCO MEN MAY
STORE TOBACCO CROP
?+?
NEW YORK, April 4?James B.
Duke is proposing that a great ware
house company be organized, with cap
ital and storage room sufficient to
properly handle the entire tobacco
crop of the South, and keep it from
being dumped on the market each
fall.
NEW JERSEY WANTS
BRIDGE TO NEW YORK
TRENTON. N. J.. April 4.?The New
Jersey assembly passed a resolution
asking the Federal government to
erect the proposed $40,000,000 bridge
between New York and New Jersey.
INDICTED PARTNERS
ARE QUARRELLING
?+?
NEW YORK. April 4?The New
York American says: A serious disa
greement has arisen betweon Henry
Siegel nnd Frank E. Vogel, due to the
fact that Siegel, in his examination in
equity proceedings, has placed respon
sibility for the handling of financial
affairs of their corporations on his
partner, and Vogcl's attorneys fear
that Siegel is laying plans by which
he may be able to escape conviction.
The Eagle Brewery Is now deliver
ing Bock Beer to Its customers, both
in kegs and bottles. The brewery has
always been noted for the excellent
Bock Beer it brews, but this year it
excels that of previous years, and sur
passes any Bock Beer on the Pacific
coast. It is made from the choicest
malt and imported Bohemian hops.
4-4-2t.
B. M. Behrends Co. announce the
arrival of their usual strong Wooltex
line of coats and suits. 4-3-2t.
You'll find the cosmopolitan crowd
at the Stampede. 2-19-tf.

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