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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 30, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
Telephone No. 3-7-1
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager.
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
Entered as second-clue matter November 7, 1912 at the postolllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oo* year, by mall .- v. * $10.00
Six months, by mall 6.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
A HOMOGENEOUS PEOPLE.
THE Mexican affair Is giving us another demonstration,of the hotno
geneousnoss of the American people. Though we were in the midst
of a concerted movement to discredit the administration through an
attack on Its foreign policy, with the first indisputable sign ten days ago that
the government would be compelled to exert the National force against a
foreign potentate, all signs of party division disappeared, except, of course,
for a few screeching jingoists and still fewer Wilson-Bryan haters. Like as
was the case when a hostile people destroyed an American battleship in
Havana harbor sixteen years ago. there Instantly was but one people from
the Atlantic to the Pacific. No longer were there partisans struggling for
position or advantage. All. with the exceptions noted, were Americans read>
to defend the National honor by supporting the administration in whatever
course it might determine to follow.
Senator laxlge. the senior Republican member of the powerful Senate
foreign relatious committee said:
"But that salute is a government action. All party lines disappear In
the demand for amends for such an insult, and we all stand behind the Presi
dent's demand for atonement." . '
And old "Uncle Joe" Cannon, so loug the dictator in the House of Repre
sentatives. who was dethroned by the movement that swept Wilsou and
Bryan into place that made them the spokesmeu of the American people in
affairs among Nations and guardians of our National authority, who landed
in New York last week just before the first blow, had been struck, said:
"The President is entirely competent to act. Congress is entirely com
petent to act. Whether his course has been a failure or not. whether his
present decision is wise or not. 1 believe that Congress should support him.
And whether his decision is wise or not. I hold that the country should sup
port him and will support him."
Of the men now living who have been Secretary of State within the
last 20 years. Richard Olney. Robert Bacon. Elihu Root and William J. Bryan
believe the free tolls clause should be repealed. Only Philander C. Knox is
in favor of free tolls. Judge William R. Day. of the Supreme Court, has not
expressed an opinion. 'According to the Hearst standard. England has had
charge of the American foreign affairs department a long time.
TAFT'S WAR PICTURE.
THAT was a graphic picture of war and its disasterous consequences that
former President Taft gave the blood-demanding students of Yale the
other day. He said: "General Sherman, who knew most about It,
said: 'War is hell." Following in the wake of war comes a decadence in gov
ernment. corruption and the tremendous burden of pensions. We have had
our experience in the Civil war and the Spanish war. A war with Mexico
will be no trail of glory?it will be a trail of woe. Not one of you. when you
looked back at it after it was over, would welcome it. I hope you would greet
It with a stern determination to meet your responsibility. Gentlemen, 1 hope
God may avert war."
True, every word of it. Particularly, startinglv, and terribly true the
"decadence in government, corruption and tremendous burden of pensions"
that follow in its wake. He could have added, also, that it would take a'
generation to recover from the distorted viewpoint toward government and
life in general that would result from the false standards that war always
creates.
All praise to Wilson and Bryan for doing all within their power to avoid
a National calamity.
Former Secretary of State Richard Olney, who wrote a strong letter in
favor of the repeal of the free tolls law and supporting the position of Presi
dent Wilson, is he who sat at the right hand of President Cleveland during
the controversy with Great Britain over Venezuela and who is generally
given much of the credit for formulating the administration policy in that
matter. Surely, he is not afraid of Great Britain!
THE FREE TOLLS HEARING.
IT WAS a sad day for the Hearsts and the McLeans and those who con
spired with them for one cause or another to discredit the administra
tion when, concluding from noise the conspirators were making that
they had the country stampeded. Senator O'Gortnau and other opponents of
the administration plan, asked for a 15-days hearing on the bill before the
interoceanic canals committee of the Senate. The longer the hearing pro
gressed the stronger the administration became. The free ships plan reach
ed its zenith, so far as public opinion is concerned, the day it was advocated
in the House by Champ Clark, and it lost then and there by 86 majority.
There are. of course, many who favor free tolls from conviction, just as
there are many who favor ship subsidies and high tariffs. They, however,
are content to state their positions frankly and fairly, as Taft and Under
wood declared their adherence to the policy of ship subsidies, admitting good
faith as they claimed and demonstrated it. But the conspirators are they
who made the noise, and who see the shrieking rockets they sent up return
ing as charred and broken sticks.
Women before marriage have their fathers' names; wnen they
are married they have their husbands' names; they never have a
name of their own to keep and pass down to their children.?Char
lotte Perkins Oilman.
At that they have one one the men, who are born with their fathers'
names and must keep them. No woman is compelled to marry A. Mutt.
IN THE INTERESJ OF STATE RIGHTS.
HE action of the Western Governor's Conference at Denver in declar
Ting in favor of State control of the natural resources of the West was in
the interest of better government. The Governors declared "those who
control the soil control the Nation." True: and also true is the analogious
proposition that those who control the soil control the State. Therefore,
the State, as is the case with most of the Western States now, the soil of
which is owned by the Nation, will be controlled by the Nation. And
this gives the people of the West bureaucratic, non-resident government
rather than self-government.
The Western Governors are moving "directly in the interest of self
government in the West when they ask for the control of the natural re
sources within the boundaries of their States. They are asking for a recogni
tion of State rights that are logical and in the interest of the good of all.
They recognize, however, that the retention of the rights of the States in
volves the performance of the duties of the States, so they suggest that,
as a condition precedent to the abandoning of the control over the natural
resources by the Federal government, that the States prepare for the sane
administration of those resources and their protection from monopoly.
That the ships of the navy were ready for immediate duty on a few
hours' notice speaks well for that branch of the service. A navy that car
always move quickly in any emergency is the only navy worth having .
Proposing to establish Nation-wide prohibition of the liquor traffic, Rep
resentative Hobson opens the proceedings with the remark: "We do nol
intend to argue the merits of this question." That is usually the attitude
of people who undertake to regulate the conduct of other fellows.
If Gen Coxey wants employment for his "army," he might start at the
head of it for the Mexican, border.
The more we traffic with the Mexicans the more convinced we all be
come that we do not want to annex that country. Just think of having 13,
000,000 to 15.000.000 Mexicans as citizens of the United States!
May Get College Presidency. Mexican Money Cheap.
WASHINGTON. Pa., April 30.?Ex- NEW YORK. April 30.?Mexican ei
President Theodore Roosevelt will re- change has advanced to 380, up 3
reive an offer of the presidency of the points from the last previous quota
Washington and Jefferson college of tion. This makes the Mexican dolla
this place. worth only 26 cents.
JENNINGS LECTURES
GRAND JURY LOBBY
(Continued from Pago One.)
to them >8 also contempt of coyrt.
Any attempt to hamper tho investiga
tion of alleged offonses by a grand
jury Is a contempt of court that will
be severely dealt with. It Ib your duty
of each*aud every one of you towards
whom those Influences have been di
rected. to inform the court, that the
offender be dealt with as by law pro
vided. If you fall of that duty, you are
yourself guilty of contempt of court,
and If you listen to any such induce
ments or representations, not only are
you guilty of contempt of court, but
you also deserve the contempt of every
honest and honorable man.
The stream of Justice Is not to be
polluted anywhere In its course; least
of all Is it to be polluted at its fountain
head?the grand jury. Our only safe
ty as a society depends upon the ad
| ministration of justice among our
selves. Justice for all?there is not
one law for the rich and another one
for the poor?one for the prosperous
and another for the needy.
If the evidence submitted to you con
vinces you that a crime has been com
mitted and that there is reasonable
ground to believe a certain person
committed that crime, you should in
dict that person and let the matter
be tried by a petit jury. All matters
in extenuation, all pleas for sympathy,
all consideration for his family, all
resentment against other persons ?
i whlf?h von have noth
ing to do. If a mnn Is charged with
stealing $10, you hear the evidence
i against him, and, if that evidence
shows that he is probably guilty, you
indict him, and that man hns to stand;
trial and make his defense?and yet1
he may have been in dire need when;
he took the money?he may have had j
a wife and many children depending j
upon him. He has no one'to plead i
before you for him, he has no agents;
and friends to manufacture sentiment
and exert Influence. ? ? ?
And so, if there comes before you
the case of a man with troops of i
friends, with influence and power, you
should look at his case in the very I
same light as you use when you look
into the case of the $10 thief.
You are only the accusing body. Af
ter an accusation is made the accused
is to have a fair trial.
It is the boast of our clvilzation that j
it is founlled on law; it is the boast I
of our law that for justice all places i
are a temple and all seasons are sum
mer, and it is the boast of Justice that j
all men?the highest as well as the'
lowest?are amenable to its sanctions, i
That is not justice which accords to
one man a consideration greater than
that which is bestowed upon another
In like circumstances: that Is not Jus
tice?that is prostitution of the laws
of your country. ? ? *
It is discrimination like that which
I scatters abroad the seeds of discon
tent and anarchy. Every such dis
crimination speaks with a thousand
tongues and adds volume to the cry
that the law bears down upon the poor
and unfortunate, while it winks at the
transgressions of those in affluent cir
cumstances. We know?you and I
know that the law does no such thing
?it is only faithless administrators of
the law who do those things; and yet
every such discrimination puts a dag
ger in the hands of the enemies of
your civilization, of your country, and
of your government?and lights the
torch that may blaze the way to
bloody revolution. * * *
In every case there is but one ques
tion before you?and that is: "Is It
probable from the evidence before us
that the accused has committed a
crime?" If so, it is your duty to in
dict him, whether he be high or low,?
rich or poor,?white or black?not
yours to try the offender?not yours to
conjure fanciful doubts, or make hair
line distinctions, or draw back in hes
itation because the person might pos
sibly be innocent. This' only is yours
?to say, as good citizens, as men who
know the right, and knowing, dare
manitain, as grand jurors of a com
I monwealth which you yourselves are
making on your oaths, "what does the
evidence before us show?"
? ? ?
REVIEW OF REV. L. F.
JONES* THLINGET BOOK
"A Study of the Thlingets of Alas
ka." thc^book written by Rev. Livings
ton F. Jones, for twenty years a resi
dent of Juneau, and treating of the na
tive race of Southeastern Alaska, has
been well received and favorably crit
icised generally throughout the coun
try. The following criticism is taken
from the Tuckerton (N. J.) Record,
where Mr. Jones was born and lived
before coming to Juneau more than
? a score of years ago:
"Among the important publications
of the year, a volume entitled: 'A
Study of the Thlingets of Alaska,' by
! Livingston F. Jones, is of special in
terest to the people of Tuckerton and
vicinity, because of the many friends
the author has here. The book itself
t Is worthy of studious consideration.
, It is a fairly exhaustive description of
a somewhat unknown but very inter
esting people, the Thlingets of Alaska.
Although, living in territory that has
? been part of the United States since
March, 1867, some of their customs
suggest that they might be living on
- another planet.
"Totemism is the foundation oi
their social structure. Marriage and
- jurisprudence depend upon It entirely
It is interesting to note that Darwin
:- ism. long before Darwin's time, hai
0 found a comfortable place in the sys
i- tem. ,
r "The discussion of the origin of the
Thlingets suggests an interesting
study. After reading ttao fair presen
tation of the conflicting opinions, one
inclines to the author's view as being
the first in plausibility, and especially
the best substantiated by concrete
facts.
"The chapter entitled 'Shumanlsm
and Superstitions,' gives n vivid pic
ture of the weird practices arising
from superstitious associations of
'sickness with witchcraft. Surely the
witch-doctor is worth dreaming about.
"A new vision is given to us of the
possibilities of human nature in the
chapter on Native Jurisprudence.
The process of justice among the
Thlingets, though simple in its moth- j
od, is extremely absurd and ludicrous |
in its conclusions and adjustments. AI
reading of this chapter ought to euro
a most dismaA case of the 'blues.' i
"The book treats twenty-four inter
esting subjects, relating to Thllnget
life, giving a chapter to each one.
Some of the subjects are the follow- <
ing: The Thlinget Language; The )
Family; Personal Appearance; Indus- 1
tries; Food; Disposition of the Dead;
Legends; Religion; Education.
"No place is given to theorizing or .
scholastic speculations, but every
chapter is crowded with concrete de
tails of the actual life of the people. .
This wealth of facts, so clearly and
attractively presented, makes the <
book a monument of accessible, in
structive information. This book
makes the author the Herodotus of
the Thlingets.
"Even at this early date, the boon is
recognized as having attained a stand
ard and authoritative place in Pacific
Coast Ethnology. It is a valuable
contribution to the study of the in- j
habitants of North America. i
"The Table of Contents is carefully
prepared and exhaustive. The Al
phabetlcal Index enables one to turn |
to any passage in the book quite read- !
ily. The type Is large, and the pic
tures are excellent.
"The author, Livingston F. Jones,
was born in Tuckerton, New Jersey. ;
One year after completing his theo
logical training, he went to Alaska
as a missionary. Living more than i
twenty years among the people of i
whom he writes, ho was in a position
to secure his information flrsthanded.
"Although a prophet may be appre
ciated anywhere but in his home
town, it is hoped that the people of
Tuckerton will give Mr. Jones' book
the cordial reception it so richly de
serves. It is published by Fleming H.
Kevell, 15S Fifth Ave., New York
City."
CALL OF THE" NORTH.
Ralph Comau, for two years pre
vious to lust July foreman of the Star
office but since that time a resident
of Seattle, has heeded the call of the
North and returned as far as Juneau
where he has a position with the Daily
Empire. .Mr. Coman is a good .man in
a "print shop" und the Empire is to
be congratulated on securing bis ser
vices. His family will likely Join him
in the Alaska metropolis later.?
Whitehorse Star.
~ r
Launch "Cordelia D"
FOR CHARTER
Fast and Comfortable
See Davis Brothers, Phone 4-5
A LETTER FOR YOU?
List of lettorB remaining unclaimed
In tho postofflco at Junoau, Alaska,
oil April 2 5, 1914. Parties wishing
same, when calling, please say, "ad
vertised":
John Anderson (2 letters), Fred An
derson (card), Lars eUter Anderson,
Ray Anderson, Hene Anderson, Peter
Andrew, N. C. Auburn, C. H. Ball, Pet
ar Balatovlch, Clarence S. Blake, Billy
Beavens, F. L. Cleary, Wm. J. Curry,
Spacoma De Luca, Bertha A. Davis,
T. J. Darby, Mr. De Camps, J. L. De
van, A. Dykens, F. H. Dunn, John .T.
Erb, Jose E. Gomez, Chas. Gullery,
Sam Gniek, Ole Hllde (card and let
ter)), Wm. It. Huddle, Oscar Jensen
(card), C. Janson, Carl Johnson, Har
ry Jones, Kansbek Kardanoff, Chas.
Kenp (2 letters), Jack Kooney, Phil
ip A. Knowlton, Alfred Knutson, Frank
Louis (card), Paulina Loumala card),
0. L arson, Lee Landback, Albert Lock
ner, Al. Lodcll, Ira E. Lynn Lars Lille
bo (3 cards), Wm. Mekiernen, Thomas
Mouzies Hawley Mlllbourn (card and
letter) L. Morris, J. A. MacKenzie, M.
J. Noone (card), G. Olson (card), Geo.
Poropat, Joe Raby, Robert Reed, John
Ruzich, John Sckayen Frank Short,
Annie Tobol (2 letters), F. Vlsnoss
(card). Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Vachon,
Charlie Weppler C. G. Watklns, G. B.
Wells, P. H. White, Ed. Williams, Bill
Woods, L. E. Woods (card).
E. L. HUNTER. P.M.
? ^
CLASSIFIED ADV.
t +
WANTED?First class baker. Ap
ply Labor Department, Alaska-Gastln
sau Co. 11-4-tf
FOR RENT?Furnished rooms and
apartments, either slnglo or ensuito
for housekeeping. Apply at office, No.
1, Hogan's Flats, phone 209. 11-11-tf
FOR RENT?Good furnished room*
Apply over Britt's Pharmacy at Matt
Button's place. 120 Seward Street
J-18-tf.
FOR RENT.?House suitable for a
atore or boarding house with rooms in
connection. Phone Douglas 54. 4-15-tf
FOR SALE ? Small restaurant,
cheap; doing a good business; owner
going inside. Add. E. M. P. O. Box
343, Juneau. 4-28-3t.
FOR SALE?Ono horizontal brick
yard boiler (10 x 43), 25 h. p. capacity'
with full flush front and all fittings.
Good as new, Cheap for cash. Alaska
Steam Laundry, Juneau, Alaska.?4-16
lm.
FOR RENT?Signs can be had at
The Empire office.
The Jelly crowd, the good smokes,
the pleasant play will make you happy
day by day. Play pool at Burford's
and take the kinks out of your liver.
2-16-tf.
Pennant Bread
In Sanitary Wrapper*
Try It and you will use no other.
For sale by all grocers. Call the
Eureka Bakery
302 Franklin 8L Phone 2122
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.CCoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert Swaneon, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY APRIL 2?12?23; MAY 3
Orphcum Bulldl i* C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J- T. SPICKETT. 'AffL
. . _?
JUST RECEIVED
a full lino of white and gold band
china. Complete sets at low prices.
Those goods are open Btock. Come in
nnd select pieces to All up your brok
en set
I I CHARICK
^ JEWELER and
KJ OPTICIAN
Wethor you llko Havana or domes
tic clgnrn, you can get the kind you
like at Burford's. 2-16-tf
+?????????????????? M#MM
i:S. H. MILLWEE !
i| LAWYER |
; ' 204-206 Seward Building Juneau, Alaska X
PETTIT & HARVEY
Rental* and General Collection*
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
Auditing and Accounting
Agent* Northern Life Insurance Co.
Cheney Bldg. Phone 207
|t 1 1 111 11 1 I 111 1 M I 1 111 H ?]??!?
SPECIAL SALE j
j: I.a Shingle ?;
i: Two-Fifty Thousand;;
;; WorthenSawmillii
-i ill 111 H 111 ni i I i m 11111
?? *
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
STATIONERY 8TORE
Headquarters for all kinds of j
STATIONERY
OFFICE 8UPPLIE8
FOUNTAIN PENS
All Kinds BLANK BOOKS
DRAFTING PAPERS, EAC.
COR SECOND & SEWARD ST.
? ?
? 1 1 II II III 1 III 111 111 111 I 14
:: New SPRING STOCK RECEIVED
Latest styles in SKIRTS-WAISTS the ||
vory prettiest-Children's one-piece
Dresses - XXDTS OF NEW GOODS
-j Mrs. Berry's Store - Juneau
?' 111111 I 11 I i I m 111 I i m 1-+
Telephone 289
THE GENUINE
Ladles' and Gents' First Class
Cleaning, Dyeing, Repair
ing and Pressing
All Kinds of Remodeling
All Work Guaranteed
386 Front St. Juneau, Alaska
McCloskeysj
m m m m m 11 m 11 m
::DR. H.VANCE}
The
!! OSTEOPATH::
;? Rooms 5 and 6 Malony Bldg.
? ? Consultation and Examination I!
;i Free. Phone 262. ')
Graduate American 8chool of "
I) Osteopathy, Klrksvllle, Mo. ?;
Seven years' active practice.
. ' Office hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 5 !!
!! p. m., or by appointment \ \
TlI 11 1 11 I 1 I 111 111 III III 1 ll
w. a. Ferguson m. H. Kirkpatrick
The Buffet
Hotel Cain
NINE-YEAROLD BONDED
WHI8KEY
"nothing but the best"
side entrance
next to elks hall
* a7 h. humpheries ^
GENERAL TRANSFER
Heavy Hauling a Specialty
Phone*?Office 258, Barn* 226
Office, Valentine Bldg.
? ?
B. D. STEWART
MINING ENGINEER
U. s. MINERjAL surveyor
P. 0. Box 168 ? ? ? Juneau
+ =
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and
SHEET METAL WORKS
121 Front 8L Phone 358
+ ?
; 111111 n n n n n m i 111? ?
i: A. Benson ! i
' | Stand at WOta' Grocery Store
i ! Phonea 4 "9 or ' [
? ? ORDKRS PROMPTLY KXECUTEl) . .
I I I II IMII IIHII|?
VWWWWWVWtSJWSXXSXXKJ
1 HARRY SMITH
g ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 5
5 la at present at the Occidental Hotel. Mr. f
f. Smith will open oflicce ahortly In the Vol- J
2 cntine Buitdinir.
N\N\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\N\
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Sketchei Free
Office, Room 7, Garslde Block
Juneau, Alaska.
?????????????????????????>
o THE BE8T LOAF OF
BREAD
\\ Is 8old.At * <!
:: San Francisco Bakery ??
<? G. MESSERSCHMIDT. Prop.
* MARSHALL & NEWMAN *
Plumbing, Heating and
? Sheet Metal Works
JOBBING A SPECIALTY
Phone 373; 139 Franklin, Cor 3rd.
+ ?
If You Want the Best?
' ASK FOR
EI'STEYN, GILMOUR & CO.
Alaska Agents
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mall
STEAMER GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Fun*
ter, Hoonah, Gypsum, Tenakee,
Killisnoo, Chatham & Sitka 12 p. m.
April 5, 11. 1/, 23. 29; May 6. 11,
17, 23, 29; June 4, 10, 16, 22, 28.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Eagle
Kiver, Sentinel Light Station, El
drill Hock Light Station, Comet,
Haines, Skagway, 12 p. m., April
3, 9, 15, 21, 27, May 3, 9, 15, 21,
27; June 2, 8, 14, 20, 26. Return
ing, leaves Skagway tho following
day at 2 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
The Home of Hart Schaffner 8 Ma rx I
CLOTHING
Suits from M5.oo to S30.oo I
Alasfca-Treadwell
Gold Mining Go.
Treadwell
Alaska
>
*
Cojijrrtjbt H*n Srhaflbcr & M?r* u

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