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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 02, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 458. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
War Talk Abates With
Assurance of Peace
WASHINGTON. May 2.?Increased
assurances of peace with a steady
abatement of war talk is the dominant
feature of the Mexican developments
today.
Gen. Carranza telegraphed Secre
tary of State William J. Bryan today
from Chihuahua, saying that the Con
stitutionalists would not enter into any
formal agreement for the establish
ment of a neutral zone around the
Tampico oil wells.
Mexican Foreign Minister Resigns.
MEXICO CITY. May 2.?Minister of
Foreign Affairs Rojas and First Assist
ant Foreign Minister Kulz tendered
their resignations to Gen. Huerta to
day because of dissatisfaction with
what they regard as his failure to keep
faith with the envoys of the Nations
who are endeavoring to arrange peace.
The immediate cause of their resig
nation was the signing of an order by
Gen. Huerta prohibiting commerce
with the United States and directing
that the entrance of American vessels
be rejected.
Huerta's order declares the Vera
Cruz customs house closed to inter
national traffic.
Ruiz Again Appointed.
MEXICO CITY. May 2.?Esteva Ru
iz, formerly assistant Foreign Min
ister. was this afternoon appointed to
succeed Portillo Rojas, resigned.
Huerta Stops Execution.
MEXICO CITY. May 2.?Minister
of War Justice Blanquet last night
signed an order stopping the execu
tion of Dr. Kdward Ryan whom Gen.
Maas had sentenced to death.
Dr. Ryan Released.
MEXICO CITY. May 2.?Gen. Huer
ta this morning ordered the release of
Dr. Ryan, and directed that he be
sent from Mexico City.
Mexicans Take and Surrender Ameri
can Vessel.
WASHINGTON. May 2. ? Admiral
Howard, commander of the fleet on
the west coast of Mexico, reported
last night that Federal Mexican offi
cials who thought war had been de
clared on the United States by Mex
ico. seized an American brig yester
day. They released the brig and
apologized upon demand for that ac
tion by the United States cruiser Ral
eigh.
Refugees at San Diego.
SAN DIEGO. May 2.?Two hundred
and sixty refugees from Mexico ar
rived here last night on the German
steamship Marie.
Mexican Mob Kills German Woman.
YEltA CRUZ. May 2.?Mrs. Clara
Beckmeyer. a German, mistaken for
an American, was killed by a mob of
Alexlcans in the streets of Mexico!
City today.
Senators Would Fight.
WASHINGTON. April 30?Senator
John W. Weeks, as he did at the begin
ning of the Spannlsh war, has tendered
his services to the President in event
of trouble in Mexico. Senator Henry
A. Dupont of Delaware, 76 years of
age. has done likewise.
The former is a graduate of the nav
al academy and the later of the mili
tary academy.
MASONS TO BUY
BUILDING LOT
The Scottish Rite Masons of Juneau
will meet next Wednesday night to
consider the proposition of purchasing
a site for a Scottish Rite temple. From
present indications it is almost a cer
tainty that a site will be purchased,
but it is unlikely that immediate ac
tion will be taken toward construct
ing the temple.
"DR. GAREL HAMA"
Good Feature?Three Parts?at the
Grand Theatre.
The big feature was certainly a big
hit It is a story of a daredevil crim
inal?you will enjoy it Your last
chance to see it tonight. Come and
bring the children.
Caumont Weekly ? interesting
events.
"While Mrs. McFadden Looked Out"
?Thanhouser comedy.
Sunday's Program.
The pictures for our Sunday's pro
* gram are always carefully selected,
always trying to please the patrons.*
"Counterfeiter." two-reel Kay Bee
feature?some interesting and thrilling
events. You will see big fights with
the Indians.
"Gaumont Weekly," another good
one.
"Brother Love." American drama, a
good one.
"Wrong Flat." laughable Solax com
edy.
* F. E. Patrons, well kwnon travel
ing man returned from Sitka on the
Georgia last night
Skating. Sunday. Jaxon's rink.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?59.
Minimum?37.
Precipitation?.44.
Part Cloudy; rain.
*
BEHRENDS TO BUILD
NEW POSTOfflCE
D. M. Behrends has been awarded
a five year contract beginning October
1, 1914, to furnish the government a
building for tho Juneau postofflce. The
contract will be accepted and the build
ing erected on Third street between
the new Behrends bank building and
the Surveyor General's office, and di
rectly opposite the Juneau Furniture
company's store. The new postofflce
building will bo erected immedately
| at the same time and in conjunction
,wlth the bank building. Both are to
[be of modern concrete and steel con
struction. The postofflce building will
be absolutely fireproof.
The building will occupy a space 50
x 50 and will be constructed with tho
view of serving for mercantile pur
poses when the lease expires or the
government gets through with it Tho
awarding of the lease for the building
involves the expenditure of between
$4,000 and $5,000 for boxes fittings and
furnishings, on the part of Mr. Behr
ends. Tie has assumed the burden of
doing this without asking the assist
ance of anyone. The government was
for a long time doubtful of getting
suitable location pending the con
struction of the new Federal building
and Mr. Behrends' action was undoubt
edly a great relief.
The new location for the postofflce
is central and a natural focal point.
WILL OPEN EWING
STREET AT ONCE
! Ewing street is to be opened at!
once from Front street to Gastineau
avenue. The street committee was di
rected by resolution at last night's
session of the city council to open the
street and were given full power to
act with a limit on expenditure not
to exceed $150. This action was taken
on petition of Robert Hurley and R.
\V. Wulzen who have recently complet
ed an apartment house in that neigh
borhood.
Mr. Hurley, who was present, made
a very earnest address to the council
on the subject and said that if the
street was not opened that they
would have no means of getting water
or sewer connection. He said that they
would be willing to donate at least a
part of the expense of building the
sewer.
Councilman Britt was of the opin
ion that the street committee should
not be tied down to so small a sum.
but it developed that there are so
many demands for streets to be open
ed that in each instance a limit must
be set.
GEORGIA BRINGS BIG
LIST OF PASSENGERS
The Georgia, arriving from Sitka
and way ports brought the following
big passenger list to Juneau:
From Sitka?Wm. JefTeries, F. E.
Parsons. L. J. Wllhelm, Alex Froloff.
John Day, Geo. Kostrometinotf, Evert
Holmes, and the crew of the schooner
Montana; from Chatham ? Deputy
Marshal Allen. K. Bunya. T. Tanaka,
K. Yonezka, H. Alkobona; from Killis
noo?Peter G. Peltret and Geo. H.
Whitney; from Lenakee?Mr. and Mrs.
J H. Chisel, and Annie Gordon; from
Gypsum?J. W. Taylor; from Forbe'B
cannery?H. Knutson.
NOTICE.
"uneau Lodge, No. 700, L. 0. 0. M.,
will observe its Memorial Sunday at
Odd Fellows' hall, Sunday, May 3,
1014, 8 p. m. All members, their fam
ilies and sojourning brothers are re
quested to attend.
HUGO HE1DORN,
T. J. McCAUL,
DR. P. J. MAHONE,
L. VAN LEHN,
4-30-31. Committee.
PASSENGERS ARRIVING
ON THE PRINCESS MAY
The Princess May arrived from the
South at 4:30 this morning bringing
the follownlg passengers for Juneau:
Larry Teshera, Edna Lewis, W. S.
Green. J. Ware, Marguerite McQuade,
Charles Ivan. D. L. Clouse, Harry Lew
is, S. J. Ross, Mona Green, D. Brash,
Charles Hent: a, Jes Boys, and ten
second class.
WHEN THE DOCTOR SEES YOU
bring a prescription to this pharmacy,
he knows that his efforts will not be
thwarted either by poor drugs or in
accurate compounding. We have a
reputation among physicians for per-'
feet prescription work. You can take'
their opinion as authoritative and
bring your prescriptions here to be
filled. "There's a Reason." Phono 3.
Doran's Prescription Pharmacy. 4-24-tf
AT THE ALASKAN.
A. Kelly. Sheep creek; C. Johnson,
Treadwell; T. Mohr and wife, Juneau;
F. Taylor, Portland: F. Dixon and fam
ily, C. Peters and wife, H. Howard, Se
attle: W. Walsh, Harry Davis, Ta
coma.
Just arrived?fresh Augustine & Ky
er's chocolates, made April 20th. Ju
neau Drug Co. Telephone your order,
phone 250. 4-28-tf.
Typewriters for rent. See W. H
Case. 3-17-tf.
Skating, Sunday, Jaxon's rink.
MAY DAY BALL
GREAT SUCCESS
The May Day *all given by tho
Draper Club of Juneau in Elks' hall
last night for the benefit of tho Ju
neau public library fund will long bo
remembered as one "of tho most bril
liant social functions evr held In Ju
neau.
Tho feature of the ovonlng was tho
crowning of the May Queen and the
May polo danco Immediately following.
Miss Sylvia Koskey made a beautiful
Queen of the May and was greeted with
rounds of applause upon ascending
the throne attended by two charming
maids of honor, Miss Georgia Caro
and Miss Helen Troy, and little Misses
Madeline Valentine and Lydla Kashe
varoff, fairies. The May pole dance
was performed by twenty-two of Ju
neau's most beautiful and charming
society girls. The dance was per
formed with a grace and finish that be
[ tokened conscientious training.
The May pole dance was under
the direction of Miss Levina Wlllson
and Miss Loraine Andrews. The fol
lowing well known Juneau society
girls took part in tho dance: Miss Get
chell. Miss Gladys Swenson, Miss Ruth
Chrlstianson, Miss Marlon Ousby, Miss
Muriel Folsom, Miss Anna Dudley,
Miss Katherine McLaughlin, Miss Eva
Cole, Miss Catherlno Wagner, Miss
Ruth Priest. Miss Alma Sowerby, Miss
Beatrice Behrends, Miss Gertrude
Held, Miss Vera Mullen, Miss Eliza
beth Heid, Miss Charlotte Ousby, Miss
Ruth Anderson, Miss Esther Josltn,
and Miss Alice Margrio.
The hall was elaborately decorated
in the colore of the Draper Club, yel
low and white. There was a lavish dis
play of flowers and artificial butter
flies. evidences of May day, formed an
Impressive little touch in the artistic
work of the decorators. While the
dance was an informal affair the beau
tiful gowns of the ladies present great
ly enhauced the sceno.
Tho music furnished by the famous
Juneau orchestra under the direction
of Prof. J. Sumpf was all that could
be desired, and encores were gener
ously given on demand. Light refresh
ments were served during the evening.
From every point of view the dance
was a big success. Financially the
success was pronounced,, the entlro af
fair, including the funds realized from
the voting contests for the May Queen,
netting approximately $600 which will
go into the library fund. Three hun
dred tickets to the ball were sold. Ev
ery seat in the balcony was taken and
great crowds stood in the main audi
torium and in passage ways leading to
the gallery and hall.
PETITIONERS ASK
FOR NEW ROADWAY
At last night's session of the city
council a petition with 120 signatures
was presented in the interest of the
residents along the waterfront of
court house hill, asking the city to
open a thoroughfare from the Pacific
Coast dock at the foot of Main street
to Indian street, and to construct a
roadway over the same. The peti
tion recited to some length the necessi
ty for such action being taken and the
just demand of the petitioners for the
benefit sought.
After a thorough discussion on the
matter it was referred to the street
committee. The main obstacles to
be overcome will be the objections i
of the interior department to crossing
any of the Indian lands in Auk village
and permission to use a portion of the
property of the Pacific Coast company.
Agent S. H. Ewing of the Pacific Coast ,
company was present and volunteered
to take the matter up with the com
pany and said that he believed that
a temporary passage way over the
property could bo arranged for until
such time as the waterfront boule
vard now being outlined could be con
structed.
Mayor Reck Informed the petition
ers who were present that the city
would go as far as possible with the
road but that it was not likely that
their hopes could be realized in full
now.
JUNEAU THEATRE.
For Saturday and Sunday evening's,
the Juneau theatre offers the following
bill:
"Calamity Ann's Sacrifice," present
ing Louise Lester In a laughable com
edy Illustrating the troubles of a mov
ing picture show crew.
"Grand-dad"?feature picture in 2
full reels. A drama of sterling worth,
appealing alike to old and young.
"The Pajama Parade," an amusing
story of the college pranks and trou
bles of two young people, with a happy
ending.
Admission. 25c; children, 10c; good
music. Evenings shows at 7:30 and
9 o'clock; Sunday matinee at 2:30.
CHAIN GANG ORDINANCE
NOW IN FORCE IN JUNEAU
--+? -
The.city council at last night's ses
sion revived the old chain gang ordi
nance and the city marshal is direct
ed hereafter to work city prisoners on
the streets.
YOU CAN GET IN.
The dirt and debris Is now pretty
well cleared away on Second avenue
and you can get in to see those new
i spring and summer woolens.
! When you get in we will take your
order and when you get in to the suit
i you will feet that you get in right.
F. WOLLAND, Merchant Tailor.
A STORY IN NINE WORDS.
American Pa'nt Co.?fine wall paper
?extra low prices. 4-30-3t.
Galvanizing done by G. Roene, Sans
Soucci Bldg., Douglas.
W. G. McBRIDE IS
j POLICE CHIEF NOW
After a spirited contest und a dead
lock of some weeks William 0. Mc
Brlde was last night elected chief of
police and city marshal of Junoau over
J. F. McDonald. When the other olfl
cers were chosen there were only six
members of the council present. Mc
Donald and McBrlde each obtained
throe votes. After taking several bal
lots with no ulectlou the matter wus
carried over until the meeting of lust
night. Every member of the council
wus present last night and again the
vote stood three and three, one of the
couucllmen voting a blank ticket. On
the second ballot, however, the odd
vote went to McBrlde.
Routine Matters.
The ordinance creating city ofllclals
and fixing the compensation und nam
ing the duties, etc., was put on final
passage and passed.
Councilmuu Wolland introduced an
ordinance governing the collection of
garbage to the extent of providing that
a covered wngou must be provided for
such work. The measure receiving
no support was, however, laid on the
table.
The curront bills were audited and
warrants ordered drawn for the Bnme.
ORPHEUM SPECIAL.
?,
Saturday Night and Sunday Matinee
"General Scott's Protege," a , mili
tary drama by the Pathe Co. f
"Sleuthing," is a comedy, and the
secoud of the famous Belinda Series,
by Norma Talmade, of the Vltagraph
Co.
"Angel of the Desert," is a strong
drama, with Annie Shaeffer and Geo.
Stanley in the leading roles.
"The Cormorant" is a colored de
scriptive picture, by the Pathe Co.
"Eight Notch and Coupon Marriage"
is a laughable comedy.
In addition to the above the "Ari
zona Whistler," and performer will
appear at the Orpheum for three per
formances?tonight, matinee Sunday
and Sunday evening. This is a real
live man and regular prices will pre
vail
- . ..? 1.
sunuay anu aionuay program win oc
as follows:
Pathe Weekly.
"Alone In New York," Is the second
Issue of "What Happenea to Mary"
series, and you should not miss this
as they will be shown each week now
for several weeks with the clever little
star Mary Fuller in the title role.
"The House in Sururbia" will surely
please you when you know that Flor
ence Turner is the prominent player.
"Seven Years' Bad Luck" it oiwrof
those laughable comedies by the Edi
son Co.
"Seeing Double" is one of the best
Bunny pictures shown in a long time.
COMMISSIONER'S COURT.
The following civil actions are pend
ing in the Commisisoner's court:
Nat S. Bean has brought suit against
the proprietor of the Central Cafe to
recover *57 .50 for goods alleged to
have been sold.
Peter Popovlch has brought suit
against John Karadich to recover $39
borrowed money alleged to be due.
Harry M. Rydstrom has brought suit
against the Northern Laundry and Sup
ply company to recover $1,000 for
breach of contract.
Vido Mandich has brought suit
against Rade Stankovich to recover
on an assigned account amounting to
$64.50.
POPULAR COMEDY TO
BE PRODUCED HERE
?
"The Man from Home," Booth Tar
kington's popular, four-act comedy, is
to be presented by the "Young Folks
of Jureau," a local dramatic combin
ation on Monday night. May 11. Ev
ery effort is being made to produce the
play in the original setting and the
different parts have been well as
signed. Those taking part have been
rehearsing faithfully for weeks and it
is the intention to give the public the
best show that can be produced by
local talent.
ELKS TO PRACTICE.
All Elks arc urged to show up on
the Casey-Shattuck ball grounds to
morrow morning at 10 o'clock for base
ball practice. It is designed to pick
the Elks' team from those who turn
out for practice.
It is only the efficient man or woman
who is wanted. Our actions and the
quality of our work depend altogther
upon our health. In order to be 100%
efficient you must have 100% health.
Have you? Let us help you. The
Great Home Remedy?"Succus Herb,
al" - made from pure selected herbs
and roots?will improve your health,
purify your blood and drive away that
tired feeling, which comes with the
spring. Made only by JUNEAU DRUG
CO., phono 250. 4-28-tf.
MASONS, ATTENTION.
Called communication of Mt. Juneau
Lodge, No. 147, F. & A. M.. Monday
evening, May 4, 8 o'clock, Odd Fellows'
hall. Work in the E. A. degree. Visit
ing brethren cordialy Invited. By or
der W.M. E. D. BEATTIE, Secy.
MAY DAY CELEBRATION.
by the Juneau Socialist's Local at the
Odd Fellows' hall. Saturday evening.
May 2nd. Everybody welcome. Ad
mission, 25c. 5-1-2L
Have you seen the latest sofa pll
low designs? Stamped on a superior
quality of linen.?Mrs. Albert Berry,
The Vogue Shop, opp. Orpheum.
Tues., Thurs., Sat
fLOOD SAYS U. S.
WILL KEEP ALASKA
WASHINGTON, May 2.?Represen
tative Henry D. Flood, of Virginia,
chairman of tho House committee on
military afTalrs, spooking of tho reso
lution introduced by Representative
Frank O. Smith, of Maryland, pro
posing to trade Southeastern Alaska
for the right to ropeal the Hay-Paunce
fote treaty, said:
"It is absurd. Southeastern Alaska
1b the most valuable part of that Ter
ritory. It has enormously rich fish
eries, gold and copper mineral wealth
and other natural resources which
make It more valuable than any con
sideratldn that Great Britain could
give us in return. Besides, we are not
golug to part with any of our North
ern Territory, but are going nbead to
develop it to the limit of its capacity."
BOOST SUFFRAGE
IN EAST TODAY
WASHINGTON, May 2.?Today is
woman suffrage day. Meetings In the
interest of votes for women will be
held in various places throughout the
country tonight. Probably the most
Important will be that 'n Carnegie
hall, New York, at which Senator John
F. Shafrotb, of Colorado, and Mrs. An
toinette Funk, chairman of the Con
gressional eommlttce, of the National
Woman's Suffrage Association, will
speak. They will explain the propos
al of the Shafroth-Palmer resolution
which Senator Shafroth introduced In
the Senate, and Representative A. Mit
chell Palmer, of Pennsylvania, intro
duced in the House.
Mrs. Funk Abandons National Suffrage.
WASHINGTON, May 1.?Mrs. An
toinette Funk, chairman of the Con
gressional committee of the National
Woman Suffrage Association, has
abnndoned the fight for an amendment
to the Constitution providing equal
suffrage. She realizes, she says, the
State right point involved. She is now
supporting the Shafroth-Palmer reso
lution providing a Constitutional
amendment requiring each State to
submit the question of woman suff
rage within the State to the electors of
the State.
SENATE TO FIGHT OVER
NEW COLOMBIAN TREATY
?+? ?
WASHINGTON. May 2.?It is be
lieved that the Senate foreign rela
tions committee will favorably report
tho new treaty with Colombia giving
that country free use of the Panama
canal for government vessels connect
ed with the army and navy and $25,
000.000 in money as payment for the
Panama canal zone, but that tnere will
be a light in the Senate over the
adoption of it
Many Senators regard the first sec
tion of the treaty to be an apology
from the United States for its course
in connection with the Panama rebel
lion.
Senator Charles S. Thomas, of Col
orado, answering a criticism by Sena
tor George C. Perkins, of California,
said we ought to apologize, for "the
United States shamefully violated its
treaty with Colombia at the time of the
breaking of Panama from that coun
try. We encouraged if we did not cre
ate a revolution on the part of Pan
ama."
SENATOR BORAH AGAINST
NATIONAL PROHIBITION
WASHINGTON, May 1. ? Senator
W. E. Borah, of Idaho, notified the
committee that is endeavoring to se
cure the submission of a prohlblton
Constitutional amendment that he is
not in favor of it. He says the ques
tion of prohibition, like that of woman
suffrage, Is a matter for the States to
handle. The one is a pi dice matter
and the other relates to franchise, and
both have been properly placed in the
hands of the people most concerned.
Virginia May Vote on Question.
RICHMOND, Va., May 1.?A cam
paign has boen started to secure the
18.000 names to petitions askng for
tho submission of the prohibition
question to the voters of this State.
It is believed thoy will be secured.
STEAMSHIP SIBERIA
HAS NO MISHAP
MANILA, May 2.?The Pacific Mall
Steamship company's liner Siberia ar
rived here safely this morning. She
reports having had a pleasant trip
without any mishap. The first report
from Tokyo was erroneous.
FIFTY DOLLARS REWARD ? For
information as to whereabouts of
George Banese; aged about 36 years;
5 ft. 8 in. high; 158 pounds weight;
dark compelxion; hair and eyes dark;
eye slightly cocked; occupation, car
penter; wearing black broadcloth suit
when last seen; Greek nationality,
speaking broken English. Leave in
formation at police department Juneau
or Douglas.?John Valeson. 4-30-6t.
SPECIAL THIS WEEA!
Royal Fruit Company.
Finest Winesap apples, extra, J2.50
per box. Fresh vegetables, flincst
quality, tomatoes, green onions, aspar
agus. spinach, carrots, new potatoes,
parsley, sweet potatoes. Full line of
fruits, nuts, butter and eggs. Free de
livery, phono 280. 4-29-3t.
Capable woman wants any kind of
respectable work. Address P. O. Box
510, Juneau. 5-2-6t.
Miss Mitchell and Miss Blyth have
been re-elected teachers of the Peters
burg public school.
DISPUTANTS DISARM
IN COLORADO WAR
WASHINGTON. May 2.?Major Hoi- j
brook, who has charge of the Federal j
troops in Colorado, reporting to Sec-1
retnry of War Lindley M. Garrison, j
said the opposing forces at Walsen
berg, have agreed to surrender their
arms.
All must Give Up Arms.
DENVER, Colo., May 2.?Secretary
of War Lindley M. Garrison has Is
sued a proclamation calling upon all
not in the military service of the
United States to surrender arms.
The order Includes strikers, strike
breakers and guardsmen.
More Cavalry for Colorado.
WASHINGTON, May 2.?The War
Department ordered the quadrupling
of the Federal cavalry force In Colo
rado this morning.
Three Perish In Mine Fire.
DENVER, Colo., May 2?Three per
ish when the boarding house at the
Oak creek mine, Oak creek, burned
last night.
Gov. Amnions Acks for More Troops.
DENVER, Colo., May 2.?Gov. E.
M. Amnions yesterday telegraphed to
Secretary of War Lindley M. Garrison
requesting that additional national
troops be sent to Northern Colorado.
GOVERNMENT TAKES OVER
CANADIAN NORTHERN
JU
OTTAWA, May 2.?The Canadian
government has assumed control of
the 30 companies comprising the Ca
nadian Northern Hallway System Con
solidated. The capital Btock of the
concern Is reduced from $140,000,000
to $100,000,000, of which the govern
ment recoives outright $40,000,000 and
is further protected by a mortgage
covering the Canadian Northern and
the entire assets from each subsidiary
company on which money has been ex
pended by the Mackenzie-Mann com
pany.
' Messrs. Mackenzie and Mann release
all claims they have against the com
panies.
In the transfer o' stock provision
is made for the sut^vision of the pro
ceeds of the guaranteed securities, to
make certain they are applied to the
completion and betterment of the sys
tem.
In case of default the whole system
is to become the absolute property of
the Dominion.
LOUIS MOE HURT IN
JUALIN MINE ACCIDENT
Louis Moe, an employee of the Ju
alin mine, was brought to Juneau last
night by Manager A. E. Nadeau, of that
property and Dr R. V. Ellis, of the Ken
sington company, suffering of a lirok-l
en thigh. He is being operated upon:
this afternoon by Dr. Ellis and Dr. j
Sloane.
The accident occurred Wednesday.
They were pumping out the mine
when the chain holding the main ca
ble of the pump weights parted. Moe
was thrown down the shaft 20 feet,
striking on the pump, a double frac
ture of the femur resulting.
Frank Fremming, a pioneer of that
section, immediately went to Kensing
ton and secured Dr. Ellis.
Mr. Nadeau, Dr. Ellis and the in
jured man came to Juneau on the Pa
cific.
FAULKNER RESIGNATION
STORY FROM LEDGER
SEATTLE, May 2.?The only thing
known here definitely about the Wash
ington dispatch saying that the resig
nation of United States Marshal H. L.
Faulkner, of Juneau, had been asked
for is that such a dispatch appeared
in the Washington correspondence of
the Tacoma Ledger of Thursday morn
ing. The Seattlo papers have not con
tained anything.
NO HEALTH OFFICER.
The question of electing a city
health officer came up at last night's
meeting of the city council. After a
thorough discussion of the matter the
body adopted the idea of Mayor John
Reck that the present arrangement
was satisfactory and no further action
was taken.
PRACTICE GAME?PERHAPS
At press time P. E. Jackson, mana
ger of the Juneau baseball team is try
ing to arrange with Manager Ferris
of Treadwell, a practice game of
baseball for tomorrow between Juncau
and Douglas on the Treadwell grounds.
The Juneau Candy Kitchen opens
for business tonight on Seward street
in the Juneau theatre building. A full
line of homemade candies will bo in
stock. Orders for homemade ice
cream will be delivered to any part
of the city. 6-2-lt.
Skating, Sunday. Jaxon's rink.
A BARGAIN.
A new two-room house, furnished,
for $500. Lot 50 x 100, good location.
A. Stedman, Juneau. 5-2-2t.
Skating, Sunday, Jaxon's rink.
Portage Bay May Be
Terminus of Railroad
WASHINGTON, May 2?There aro
many evidences here that indicate that
instead of starting from any existing
town on the coast of Alaska the gov
ernment will create Its own terminal
city on Portago Bay.
Secretary of the Interior Franklin
K. Lane, and the commissioners, Will
iam C. Edes and Lieut. Frederick
Mears, are open minded as to routes,
but they unquestionably lean toward
Portage Bay.
The commission are already at
work in an office in the Interior De
partment building, examining piles of
applications for jobs, and granting in
terviews to some candidates.
Work to Start at Once.
WASHINGTON, May 2. ? Lieut.
Frederick Mears, and William C. Edes
concurring, said this morning:
"We will start for Seattle and Alas
ka Just as soon as we can get away,
perhaps within a week, and we will or
ganize and get our location parties in
the Held at the earliest possible mo
ment."
Valdez May Be Hearquarters.
WASHINGTON, May 2.?William C.
Edes and Lieut. Frederick Mears, Al
aska railroad commissioners, think
they will establish headquarters at
Valdez, with Seward as a possible al
ternative. General offices will proba
bly be established at one of these
places from which orders will be is
sued and disbursements made.
PIONEEK ALASKAIN IS
DEAD AT SEATTLE
SEATTLE, May 2.?Alex Ranke, a
pioneer of the North, widely known
among Alaskans, died here last night.
Deceased was the eldest and surviving
son of the late Otto Ranke who was
one of the prominent ? business men
of Seattle twenty years ago.
Ranke went to Circle City In the
early '00s, and was later at Dawson
and Nome.
UNPOPULAR GOVERNOR OF
ALSACE-LORRAINE IS PRINCE
?+??
BERLIN, May 2.?Emperor William
made Count Charles von Wedel, whoso
resignation as Governor of Alsace-Lor
raine resulting from trouble between
the military and civilians at Zabern
became effective yesterday, a prince.
Herr von Dallwit, formerly minister
of the interior, became viceroy of Al
sace-Lorraine yesterday.
ADMINISTRATION GIVES
OUT ANTI-TRUST BILL
WASHINGTON, May 2. ? The ad
ministration anti-trust bill was made
public this morning. It provides for
a commission of Ave and not more
than three to be of the same political
party. This commission will investi
gate the business, financial condition
and management of the corporations.
A salary of $10,000 each will be paid
the members of the commission.
KING TO HONOR A N
AMERICAN PEERESS
LONDON, May 2.?King George and
Queen Mary will honor Lady Irene
Curzon, granddaughter of the late Levi
Z. Leiter, of Chicago, and relative of
many Americans, by attending * the
"coming out" ball to be given for her
by her father, Lord Curzon, Monday
night. Lady Irene will receive a ti
tle in her own right, becoming the
Baroness Ravensdale of Ravensdale.
Hearst Carless About Study.
???
Mayor Carter H. Harrison declined
to follow the Hearst lead in fighting
the President for the reason that be
has not studied the tolls question. But
that does not appear to have deterred
his colleague.?Cordova Alaskan.
^ ^ ^ r
CONAN DOYLE TO VISIT
UNITED STATES AGAIN
LONDON, May 2?Sir Arthur Con
an Doyle has decided to pay another
visit to America, and soon will sail.
It is ten years since his last visit.
"Our plans are not clear," said Sir
Arthur today, "but this Is definitely de
cided: I shall not do any lecturing
this time."
One of Sir Arthur's hosts will be Wil
liam Gillette and another William J.
Burtu, the detective.
GOLD CREEK BRIDGE
REPORTED TO BE UNSAFE
Gold creek bridge was reported to
be in an unsafe condition at last
night's meeting of the city council
and the street committee was directed
to investigate and empowered to call
for bids to repair the same if found
to be unsafe.
FOR SALE. ? Now four-room and
bath, strictly modern bungalow; at
tractive and convenient, built in fea
tures. This is one of the best buys in
the city. Inuire Chester Murphy,
Casey and Shatuck addition. 5-2-6L
DANCING AT THE RINK.
The management of Jason's rink
will discontinue pictures, and when the
new floor surface arrir?? the floor will
be put in shape for dancing Wednes
days, and skating.
FOR SALE?New sewing machine;
a bargain. Inquire Mrs. Gage. G-2-6L

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