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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 07, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV.. NO. 461. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
HUERTAISTS ARE FLEEING FROM CAPITAL OF MEXICO
Lieut. Mears Is Not
Eligible For Commission
WASHINGTON, May 7.?A tangl
has been discovered iu the appoin
meat of Lieut. Frederick Mears to b
a member ot the Alaska railroad coo
mission. To maintain his place ou th
commission he will probably have t
resign from the army or obtain spccii
legislation. The Alaska railroad bi
limits the army odicers that the Frei
ident may detail to the Alaska railroa
service to members of the engines
corps, while Lieut. Mears is a cavulr
officer.
When Secretary of the Interio
Franklin K. Lane selected Lieul
Mears on the recommendation of Co
George W. Goethals it was presume
that he was an officer in the enginee
corps, but it develops that he was ai
engineer in civil life w hen was appoint
ed to the army through the Nations
Guard. Secretary of War Lindley M
Garrisou was not consulted bofort
the appointment was made.
Provision Aimed at Richardson.
It is charged in Washington tha
Delegate James Wickersham had th<
provision that ouly officers from th<
engineer corps of the army could b<
appointed to position i nthe Alaski
railway service inserted in the bll
for the purpose of keeping the Presi
from putting Lieut.-Col. W. P
RHrS^rdson on the commision.
- ^Uardon to Assist Dalton.
D. A. Keardon has been appointet
packeV for the Alaska railroad engin
eers and sent to join Jack Dalton.
i. . . .
DEATil CLAIMS YOUNG
RAYMOND MILLEF
Raymond Miller died at 9:30 this
morning. No hope of his recovery was
held out by Dr. L. O. Sloane. the at
tending physician, but there was s
brave struggle to preserve the spark
of life. Yesterday there were indica
tions of an Improved condition, anc
hope of ultimate recovery was felt by
many.
Raymond Miller, the son of Mr. and
Mrs J. M. Miller, was born in Nome
in 1900 and was one of the first white
children born on Seward peninsula.
Most of his young life, however, has
been spent here in Juneau where he
has been a universal favorite with old
and young alike. His untimely death
has cost cast a gloom over many Ju
neau households. The funeral will
likely be held either Saturday or Sun
day.
GOLDSTEIN BUYERS TO
LEAVE FOR NEW YORK
O. W. Leafgreen. manager of the
clothing department, and L. Martin,
manager of the dry goods department,
for the big Goldstein stores, will
shortly leave for New York to pur
chase stock for the new store, now
under construction. It is very prob
able that they will take passage from
Juneau either Sunday or Tuesday.
They will likely be gone six to eight
weeks.
CAPT. WHITNEY HAS THE MUMPS.
Capt. G. H. Whitney. U. S. inspector
of hulls and boilers for Alaska, was
taken to St. Ann's hospital this morn
ing suffering from a severe attack of
mumps.
SOLDIER OF FORTUNE KILLS
DENVER HOTEL MAN
DENVER. Colo.. May 7.?L. F. Mec
odemus. proprietor of the Savoy hotel
in this city, was fatally shot this
morning by James G. Bulger, a sol
dier of fortune, who resented being
called a "wart"
RUGS
A big assortment of large sized rugs,
and also odd sizes, are carried by the
Waldron Co., Seattle. They send them
on approval, also, to responsible peo
ple. They specialize in rugs, at 1322
Fourth avenue, Henry Building. All
inquiries willingly answered, and cuts
sent. 5-5-6t.
Have you seen the latest sofa pil
low designs? Stamped on a superior
quality of linen.?Mrs. Albert Berry.
The Vogue Shop, opp. Orpheum.
Tues., Thurs., Sat.
FOR SALE?1 desire an offer for
Lot 5. Block 214, Casey-Shattuck ad
dition to Juneau, dry and level. Write
me. making offer. Andrew Erickson,
Box 51. Prince Rupert, B.C. 5-8St.
FOR SALE?At a bargain. 5-room
house. Inquire Eikland, grey house.
Cascy-Shattuck Add. 5-8-6t.
Emil Kliese, representing the Colum
bia Brewing company of Tacoma, left
for the South on the Spokane last
night.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twonty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?83.
Minimum?33.
Clear.
? MUCH BUILDING IS
;j NOW UNDER WAY
0 All of the immense tract between
d the Juneau Iron Works and the Al
ii aska Soda Bottling Works, 275x100
has been decked over and in a few
d days it Is expected that plans will be
r decided upon for covering the space
>' with buildings for business purposes.
Of the space under development lOOx
r 100 belongs to B. M. Behrends, 50x100
t- Is the property of Winter & Pond, and
1- 125x100 belongs to George F. Forrest,
d It is expected that the property will
r be improved with buildings built to
it harmonize. Front street is being
widened for traffic in front of the
1 property and sidewalk is being laid.
Goldstein Building.
> Excavation for the big 5-story con
crete building for the Goldstein Im
provement company is progressing at
t a rapid pace this fine weather and it is
3 expected that it will be completed in
-* another ten days. The municipal
31 rock crusher which has been leased
i by the city to Thomas Bush will be
1 gin furnishing muterial for the build
- ing as soou as a few necessary articles
. arrive from below.
Zynda Building.
Excavation for the 4-story concrete
1 building for S. Zynda at Third and
? Main streets is about completed and
building operations will begin as soon 1
as material can be assembled. The
Bush-Soles company have the con
[ tract and they are depending on the
municipal rockcrusher to supply
i: crushed rock for the concrete.
i New uenrenas Building.
?i The B. M. Behrends bank building
land the new postoftlce building to be
; I erected by Mr. Behrends immediately
? adjoining Third street will be started
1 as soon as the tenants vacate the
property. The building on the cornor
is already vacunt and it is expected
to get possession of the remainder in
' another few days. Both buildings are ,
to be hurried to completion as rapidly (
as is consistent with good workman- (
ship. Both buildings are to bo as
(Continued on Page 3.)
, t ,
YOUNG TIGERS MAY
GO TO WHITEHORSE
?+?
C. W. Carter, manager of the Young
Tigers, says that he is negotiating with
j Si Tanner, and there is a probability
that a game will be played at Skag-,
; way between the Tigers and the j
White Pass club in event that the Ti-1
gers make the trip to Whitehorse for
the King's birthday celebration. It j
; is not definitely known yet if the trip'
I will be made but it is very probable.
In the meantime Mr. Carter says '
! that he would like to have a go with
some of the Gastineau channel teams. 1
I "I'm not particular," he said, "they
j all look alike to me, but I'd rather have
j a chance at P. E. Jackson's aggrega
I tion?they would be duck soup for 5
us." He said that they had expected f
| all along to play the opening game 1
! with Jackson's men, but the latter had s
! arranged to take on Treadwell next :I
Sunday and he supposed it was off.
He would like to play and early morn- f
ing game with the Gastineau Terriers
if Dick Wulzen can be pursuaded to 1
get his men together.
c
? ?
MUSICAL CLUB TO
GIVE ENTERTAINMENT j
t
j The Juneau Ladies' Musical Club
i has arranged to give their Fourth An
nual public' rehearsal in the new Ju
i neau theatre on the night of May 15,
1 under the direction of Mr. Willis E. ?<
' Nowell. The proceeds from the enter
' tainment will be devoted to the Juneau
j public library fund.
t , ,
CY WRIGHT COMING.
:
Cy Wright, who was one of the star
pitchers for the C. W. Young's Tigers
last season, is a passenger aboard the
> Al-Ki enroute to Juneau. He will
again become a part of the working
! force of the C. W. Young company and s
will take an active part in baseball
j matters. v
GUESSING CONTEST TO CLOSE.
I A. T. Spatz proprietor and manager
of the Alaskan Cafe, this morning an
nounced that owing to indications of h
an early break-up, the guessing contest f
on the departure of boats from White- t
horse and their arrival in Dawson will t
be closed on May 15th instead of June d
1st.
Miss Gertrude Mallette, of the Ju
neau high school teachers' staff, who
is ill at her apartments at the home C
of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Fisher, is re- L
ported to be improving this morning, n
EAGLE RIVER TRAIL
TO BE REPAIRED
The trail leading from tho end of
the government road to Eagle River
is to have enough repair work done on
it to place it iu a passable condition,
so that a pack horse may be taken
from Juneau Into the Eagle River
country, but there will be no funds to
spend in making tho present trail In
to a road, according to Lieut. Glenn
C. Edgerton, engineer officer and mem
bear of the Alaska road commission
who is. now in Juneau. "We will al
so locate the government road from
Skagway to tho Canadian boundary at
once," ho said, "but this is all wo can
do at this time for lack of funds. All
of the $125,000 appropriation, which
is about tho usual amount allowed Al
aska each year, must be used in repair |
work and maintenance on tho roads al
ready built. No new work can be un- j
dertakeu."
Lieut. Edgerton submitted a de-1
tailed estimate providing for tho ex
penditure of $7,250,000 in creating a
system of public highways in Alaska.
Tho report contained a scientific study
of the whole problem of road building
in Alaska submitting in detail the
cost, the necessity, and the estimated
resources of the sections sought to be
benefitted. This money was to be ex
pended during a period of nine years
beginning with the present year for
which an appropriation of $750,000 was
asked. "If this were allowed," said
Lieut. Edgerton. "Alaska would have,
when completed, a very good system
of road, and nearly all of the known
territory would be accessible."
"Nevada," said Lieut. Edgerton, "has
less mileage of public highways, in
proportion to the area of the State
than any other State in the Union,
yet the mileage of public roads in Ne
vada is eleven times greater than in
Alaska in proportion to area."
The necessity of more liberal appro
priations for public roads, Lieut. Ed
gerton thinks will be more apparent
when the government railroad is fin
ished and begins to operate. "It is
perfectly obvious," he said, "that
freight will not be shipped over the
road if people are unable to get it
away from the railroad stations."
Lieut. Edgerton has been inspecting
the conditions of the roads leadtng out
of Juneau. The Sheep creek road he
considers in very good shape except
that it should be ballasted a little
stronger for heavy trafHc. He expect
ed to go over the Salmon creek road
today in company with Supt. J. C.
Hayes.
* + 4, + + + + + + + + + + + + + ?>
> +
* ROOSEVELT LOSES 55 LBS. +
-I- +
> Para Brazil, May 7. ? Col. +
Roosevelt, who is still at this 4?
> city, says he lost 55 pounds in *
> weight during his trip into the +
> interior of Brazil. He is slen- *
> derer than he has been in years. +
> ?
> ?> ?? + + + ? -5* + -i--t, + + +
NTERESTING THREE-REEL FEA
TURE?Tonight?Grand.
"After Darkness Light" ? another
State right feature in three parts;
i story that every one has read. This
)ig production has been acted on the
itage In the leading theatres in Europe
ind America.
These big features are specially 1
;otten from the exchanges:
Gaumont Weekly?with all the in
eresting events from the world.
"Calamity Ann, Detective," Ameri
an Western cowboy comedy, sure to 1
uake you laugh. <
Come to tho Grand and pass an en- I
oyable evening witnessing good pic- 1
ures. i
AT THE ORPHEUM.
?*?
Tonight, by special request, the
Wild Animals at Large" will be re
lated. This will positively be the
ast opportunity to see the great fea
ure film.
"Groundless Suspicion" is a drama
>y the Edison Co., and features Ben
Vllson.
"O'Hara and the Youthful Prodigal"
s a comedy drama by the Vitagraph
?o., and has Van Dyke Brooke and
Cate Price in the comedy parts.
"Seeing Double" is a comedy and
hows John Bunny at his best.
Pathe Weekly?showing Gov. Clark
iewing Alaska Legislators.
c
JOHN OLDS BETTER.
Manager John Olds of the Occidental
lotel, who has been laid up with lagrip
or the past several days, is reported
o be better this morning and expects
o be out again within the next few
ays.
ALTAR SOCIETY MEETS.
The Ladies' Altar Society of the
'atholic Church meets at Mrs. H. Mc- ^
.ean's, 624 Sixth street, Friday after
? ;
LORDS TURN DOWN
WOMEN SUFFRAGE
LONDON, May 7?The House of
Lords yesterday evening rejected the
woman's suffrogo bill by a vote of 104
to 80.
This removes any possibility for the
further consideration of woman suff
rage by the present parliament, as be
fore the bill could be passed three
times in throe successive years by the
Commons tho constitutional time for
another election will have arrived.
AMERICA HAS LOWEST
RA'JE IN THE WORLD
CHICAGO, May 6. ? Secretary of
Commerce William C. Redfleld, in a
speech at Chicago, Bald: "It must in
Ifalniess be admitted that the railway
> men of today arc suffering from the
| sins of the fathers which are being
visited upon tho children to the third
and fourth generations. Yet justice and
common sense require any truthful
man to concede that when the worst Is
said respecting our railway managers
it is none the less true that they have
so wrought as to glvo America the
lowest freight rates In the world."
TWO CANADIAN ROADS
TO EMPLOY 3000 MEN
EDMONTON, Alta., May 7<?Three
thousand men and ft. large number of
teams will be at work within the pres
ent month on the grades for the
Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Col
umbia and Alberta & Great Water
ways railroads, under -construction in
central and northern Alberta, accord
ing to official advices received in Ed
monton today from J. D. McArthur,
president of the two roads.
EIGHT KILLED AND
20 HURT IN EXPLOSION
?
PANAMA, May 6.,-Eight were
killed and a score injured by an ex
plosion of a government dynamite
magazine yesterday.
THE CAMP FIRE GIRLS'
ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM
?
Following Is the Interesting program
that has been prepared for the enter
tainment to be giv^n by the Camp
Flro Girls at Elks' haHl "tomorrow eve
ning:
1.?Speech by the guardian.
2.?"Toy Symphony" Haydn
Senior Camp Fire
3.?"Song of the Planets," Bluebirds
4.?Wohelo Ceremony, and the Wo
helo Cry by the Seniors.
"The Law" Thelma NInnis
i
Candle Ceremony
Margaret Dudley
"Sevenfold Flame"... Helen Troy
"Burn Fire, Burn" (
Camp Fire Song (
5.?"EVERY GIRL"?Play by Juniors. (
6.?Speech by Judge R. A. Gunnison. (
7.?Bluebird Songs in costume: (
a.?Poppy Song.
b.?Dolls' Lullaby.
c.?Evening Song.
8.?Camp Fire Scene:
a.?Walking Song.
b.?Boating Song.
c.?Greeks' Dance.
d.?Recitation?Madge Case.
e.?Folk Dances.
f.?Mamy Moon.
g.?Boogaman.
h.?Alaska Camp Fire Song.
A dance will follow the program. The
box plans are at the Postoffice store
where reserved seats are on sale.
<
NEW FERRY SOON.
Manager E. J. Margrie of the Ju- t
leau Ferry and Navigation company. (
said this morning that ho was expect
ng word any moment to send Capt. .
IValdo Slates to Seattle to bring the
aew ferry boat Alma to Juneau.
THOS. WAND ARRIVES.
The Thomas Wand, A. C. Jansen, of
(
:ho Portland line, arrived In Juneau
:hi8 morning, eight days out from
Portland and making Bix stops. She j
wrought 100 tons of general merchau- {
Use for Juneau.
. o
SKAGWAYITE HERE. V
George Black, a well known young
nan of Skagway, has been in Juneau t
or the past few days, visiting with old
riends and attending to some business
natters. He will leave for his home
>n the Jefrcrson. v
? > l
TRANSFERRING MORTGAGES. k
B. M. Behrends haB filed a transfer y
>r all the mortgages held by himself f
ndividually as banker, to the B. M. f
3ehrends Bank, recently incorporated.
DRAWS 20 DAYS.
J." M. Mendoza. adjudged guilty of
>elng drunk and disorderly, was this li
norning sentenced to 20 days at la- s
>or by Municipal Magistrate E. W. Pet- c
it Mendoza has been frequently up c
n the municipal court. J
LADIES' AID TO MEET.
The Ladies' Aid Society of the Pres- s
>yterian church will meet on Friday 8
ifternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home ti
?f Mrs. Eikland. 11
WILSON SUPPORTS
COAL LEASING BILL
WASHINGTON, May 7.?A definite
program of conservation was adopted
this morning at a conference between
President Woodrow WilBon, Secretary
of tho Interior Franklin K. Lane and
Wetsern Senators and Congressmen.
The President made It plain that he
desires that Secretary of the Inter
lorlor Lane's bill, providing for the
leasing of Alaska coal lands to private
partios, be passed.
HOUSE COMMITTEE
AGAINST R. R. TAX
The report of the House committee
on Territories on the bill changing
the tax on railroads In Alaska from
$100 a mile to four per cent, of tho
net Income of the roads, recommend
ing that the same shall be passed, Is a
comprehensive reviow of the situ
ation In Alaska. It shows that the
$100 a mile tax applies Irrespective
of whether the road was cheaply
constructed for special purposes, and
only operated occasslonally, or wheth
er tho road was well made, thoroughly
equipped and operated continuously in
general transportation.
Only two railroads In Alaska are
paying the tax at all, the White Pass
and tho Copper River.
One road?tho Seward Peninsula?
was compelled to close down because
the government brought suit to com
pel it to pay taxes. Under the rule
that makes it a separate offense for
each day4c*operation, and tho full
penalty of one year's tax for each
day's operation if the license tax is
not paid in advance, the amounts ow
ing by some roads runs into millions
of dollars.
The report showB that the present
Governor of Alaska, the former Gov
ernor, and the Secretary of the In
terior have all recommended that It
be repealed. The Attorney-General al
so favors it.
NEW TREATY BETWEEN
U. S. AND DENMARK
WASHINGTON. May 7. ?Secretary
of State William J Bryan and Minist
er Brun have signed another peace
commission treaty between the United
States and Denmark in place of the
one which contained the compulsory
arbitration feature. The new treaty
applies only to the settlement of issues
by Investigation.
The Secretary of State said that an
other convention would be drawn at
once providing for the settlement by
arbitration of questions between the
United States and Denmark which
will not yield to diplomatic adjust
ment. This treaty, however, will be
on the lines of existing arbitration
treaties with the usual exclusion of
]uestion8 of honor, territorial in
tegrity, and internal questions, as well
as those concerning third powers.
PERHAPS HE HOGGED IT.
"Your wife is inclined to be Jealous,
sn't she?"
"Jealous! Why, she got mad one
svening during thaj cold snap because
hugged the radiator."?Boston Tran
icript.
MEW CANAL MAKES AN
ISLAND OF CAPE COD
?+?
PLYMOUTH, Mass.. May 7.?The
opening of the new canal has made
in island of Cape Cod in this state,
md shortened the water course bo
ween Boston and all Rhode Island,
Connecticut and New York bay points.
:ORDOVA TO HAVE ACTIVE
COMMERCIAL BODY
CORDOVA, May 7.?Business men
have reorganized the chamber of
:ommerce and pledged $400 a month
or six months to secure the services
>f a paid secretary to boost the town,
t is the purpose of the organization
o set forth the advantages of Cor
lova and surrounding country for in
?estors and permanent residents.
VLASKA ORPHAN BOY
LEFT IN SEATTLE STORE
???
SEATTLE, May 7. ? An unknown (
koman left a four-year-old boy, Billic
toberts, whom it 1b claimed is an Alas
ka orphan in the store of J. M. Welch ,
esterday and disappeared. All ef- ,
orts to locate the woman have proved
utile.
LABORERS LEAVING JUNEAU.
? -
The Spokane, leaving for the South
ast night, took 16 second class pas
engers for Seattle and two for Ket- 1
hlkan, all of whom are laborers who 1
lalm that they could find no work in '
uneau. <
Mrs. E. L. Adsit, mother of Lin Ad
it and Mrs. A. A. Gabbs, is a passen- i
er on the Mariposa enroute to Juneau, !
o bo the guest of Mrs. Gabbs through 1
he summer. 1
DELAY EOR ALASKA
COMMISSION BILL
Word from Washington Ib that there
is not much likihood of securing the
passage of the "Alaska Development
Board" bill, as the measure Introduc
ed by Senator George E. Chamberlain
was called ,or the "Commission Form
of Government In the Administration
of National Affairs In Alaska" bill, as
the more amplified measure lntroduc-|
ctl by Delegate James Wickorshnm in
entitled, at this session of Congress.
A letter recently received from Dele
gate Wickersham by The Empire,
says:
"There seems to be much opposition
on the part of some members of Con
gress, who are afraid the government
of Alaska will escape from the bur
eaus and committees In Washington."
The Delegate adds:
"I intend to support the President
nnd Secretary (Secretary of the Inter
ior Franklin K. Lane) In urging this
matter until we get the bill through,
although I do not anticipate its pas
sage at this session. Still, conditions
might arise which will enable us to
get it through earlier than we think."
Organization of Commission.
The bill, which Delegato Wicker
(Continued on Pago 3.)
*++++++*++?++++++
+ +
+ BECKER'S SECOND TRIAL +
? BEGINS. ?
+ ?? +
+ New York, May 7.?The sec- +
+ ond trial of former Police Lieu- +
+ tenant Becker for the murder +
+ of Herman Rosenthal began +
+ this morning. +
+ +
+ + + + + + + + + + ?? + + '!? + +
EVERY ONE CAN-AT
LEAST BE A BOOSTER
"A man's true worth Is not measur
ed by his muscle, his brain, or his
money, but by the service he renders
to the community in which he lives,"
says a noted professor, and probably
there are few phrases that contain
more truth than that. Stop and think
how much you are worth to Wrangell,
and get in and try to raise the stand
ard a notch higher. There are many
ways in which every man in Wran
gell can be of service to the commun
ity, and one of them is by saying a
good word for the city in which he
lives evory time he gets a chance, i
instead of going around complaining.
?Wrangell Sentinel.
HAYTI PREPARES TO
PAY BRITISH CLAIM i
PORT AU PRINCE, Hayti, May 7.? i
The Haytien Congress has author- i
ized the government to treat with the
British government representative in
the matter of the demand for the pay
ment of $62,000 damages to a British ,
subject on account of the loss of a ,
sawmill during the recent revolution. (
The government was given open credit |
for the payment of whatever it shall |
be decided that the government is li
able for. The action by Congress in- (
duced British officers to extend the ,
time for further negotiations, though
it is believed that the demands will
be paid in full soon.
Enllshman Get* cash.
PORT AU PRINCE, May 7. ? The '
National Bank of Haytl this afternoon (
paid the representatives of the Brit
ish government $62,000 In gold and
settled the difficulty with that country. (
i
MARIPOSA COMING NORTH.
SEATTLE, May 7.?The Mariposa J
sailed for the North last night with the
following named passengers for Ju
neau
Mrs. Ed Adslt, C. F. Hensel, T. L. j
Gibson, I'red Harder, M. Kesteloot, t
Mrs. Chirs Brown, Mrs. B. T. Rossel- B
ler, Ed. Rea, A. H. Thomas, D. C. Nel- j
Bon, Arthur DeLong, H. D. Bowery, W.
Toner, Victor Vanstels, J. Kosteo, J. f
P. Summers and 20 Bteerage.
DRAPER CLUB THANKS
THE PUBLIC FOR HELP c
At the regular business meeting of I
the Draper Club yesterday afternoon t
x vote of thanks was extended to all t
who helped to make the May day
lance the complete success that It V
was.
It was discovered that after paying
ill the bills tho club realized about
$670 net profit from tho dance, which r
was for the benefit of the public II- \
arary fund. ^
Death To Be Portion
of Mexican federals
Vera Cruz, May 7.?Gen. Funs
ton is being overwhelmed with
Huertaist refugees from Mexico
City. The supporters of the dicta
tor have abandoned all hope that
his government can continue much
longer, and they are seeking the
safety that, in their extremity,
they know exists under the Stars
and Stripes. Hundreds of those
who feel their lives will be for
feited if they remain in the capital
until the arrival of Gen. Villa or
Gen. Zapata are . reaching Vera
Cruz daily and craving the pro
tection of the American troops.
ZAPATA THREATENS TO
SEVER ARISTOCRATIC HEADS
VERA CRUZ., Mex., May 7.?Huer
taist refugees arriving here from Mex
ico City say that Gen. Zapata, who is
moving on Mexico City, had sent word
ahead that he will set up a guillotine
in the square in front of the National
palace and accumulate there a pile of
the most aristocratic heads In the
city.
Zapata's vengeance is directed large
ly against the wealthy class of the
population.
Villa to Put to Death.
Scarcely less bloody are the reports
that come to Mexico City, which are
repeated by refugees in Vera Cruz,
from Gen. Villa. The latter has made
no secret of the fact that he has pre
pared a long list of those whom se has
selected to put to death should he
reach the capital.
Villa Will Have All with Him.
The refugees say that it is a fore
gone conclusion that Gen. Villa, who
Is known to be making plans to reach
the capital at the earliest possible
date, will have not only Gen. Zapata's
support, but that thousands of the low
er classes of Mexico City will rally to
his standard.
More Mexicans Leave.
WASHINGTON, May 7.?The State
Department has been informed that
another refugee train containing 600
Mexican refugees left Mexico City at
noon today fzor Vera Cru.
Constitutionalists Dynamite Mazatlan.
MAZATLAN. Mex., May 7.?Consti
tutionalists dropped a bomb from a bi
plane into this city today and killed
four and wounded eight.
Lane to Be Mediator.
WASHINGTON, May 7.?It is ru
mored here today that Secretary of the
Interior Franklin K. Lane will be one
of the American mediators at the con
ference May 18th.
O'Shaughnessy at Washington.
WASHINGTON. May 7.?Nelson O'
Shaughnessy, formerly Charge d'Af
faires at Mexico City, arrived today
ind will confer with the President to
morrow.
Huerta Cannot Depend on Troops.
WASHINGTON, May 7.?It is cur
rently reported in Washington that
John Llnd has told the President that
Sen. Huerta cannot rely on more than
5000 of his troops about Mexico City
In the event of hostilities against the
United States. This information is
confirmatory of reports which have
reached the war department.
Missouri Must Increase Militia.
JEFFERSON, City, Mo., May 7.?Ad
iutant-General O'Meara has received
jrders from the War Department to re
sult the Missouri National Guard to
Ive full regiments of 12 companies
;ach.
Gen. O'Meara says it will not be
liflicult to fill up all the companies
vlth recruits. In many sections of
he State the applications for enlist
nent are greater than the number of
)laces there are for recruits.
U. S. Orders 100,000 Shells.
PHILADELPHIA, May 7. ? The
?Yankfort arsenal has received a gov
(rnment order for 100,000 three-inch
ihrapnel shells, the largest contract
t ever received.
>RINCE ALEXANDER BECOMES
GOV.-GEN. OF CANADA
LONDON, May 7.?Prince Alexander
if Teck was appointed Governor-Gen
iral of Canada today, to succeed H. R.
1., the Duke of Connaught, uncle of
he King. The appolntmont is efTec
ive October 1.
VHITE HOUSE WEDDING
AT SIX O'CLOCK TONIGHT
WASHINGTON, May 7. ? The mar
iage of Miss Eleanor Wilson and
Villiam G. McAdoo takes place at the
Vhite House at 6 p. ra. today.

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