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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 09, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE1'
VOL IV.. NO. 463. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, MAY 9, 1914. ' PRICE, TEN CENTS
Congress Removes Lieut.
Mears'Disqualifications
WASHINGTON. May 9.?The House
p;issod the bill authoriiug the -esigu
meat of Lieut. Frederick Mears'to the
Alaska railroad engineering com mis
?ion.
Road Commission to Supplement Rail
road work.
SEATTLE. May 9.?Col. W. P. Rich
ardson, who arrived here last night
from Washington on his way to Alas'
ka. said that until the routes of the
proposed Alaska railroad system have
been selected no new work will be un
dertaken by the Alaska board of road
commissioners. He said that the work
of the commission in the future must
be supplementary to and in support of
the railroad system.
FAIRBANKS IS AFTER
DEMOCRATIC CON VENTION
There are a number of reasous why
the Democratic territorial convention
should be held in Fairbanks this year.
The chief reason, in the opinion of the
Times, is that the coast towns are
not to be relied upon for satisfactory
results. Both of the old parties have
tried them, and always with the same
result. With the Republicans, it was
a case of too much boss rule, and with
the Democrats, lack of harmony has
interfered seriously with the proceed
ings.
It is time Fairbanks&ns were given
an opportunty toi conduct a really suc
cessful convention ? a convention
which will be a credit both to the
town and to the party which holds it.
The Fourth division Is a power in
Territorial politics, having a vote
nearly twice as great as that of any
other division, and it is time we re
ceived recognition.
We trust that the Tanana Valley
Democratic club will insist upon hold
ing the convention here, and in its
efTort to secure the gathering of dele
gates the local organization should
have the support of every camp In
Interior Alaska.?Fairbanks Times.
ALASKA GETS SPACE
IN MINERS' BUILDING
WASHINGTON, May 9.?Upon the
rocommeudation of Gov. J. F. A.
Strong, of Alaska, there will be no di
vision of the mining exhibit at the San
Francisco exposition, but 5,000 square
feet of the mines building will bo al
lotted by the government to Alaska.
COUNCIL DISCUSSES
STREET IMPROVEMENTS
At an informal discussion among the
council members at the close of the
business of last night's special session
it was practically agreed to call for
bids for the widening of lower Front
street.
Another interesting discussion was
had over the new waterfront street
which is to lead from the junction of
Main street on the Pacific Coast dock
to Indian street. It is the intention
to call thies new thoroughfare Wil
loughby avenue in honor of the late
Dick Wllloughby one of Juneau's early
pioneers.
+ *
MARINE NOTES
I
4 ?
The Admiral Evans will arrive from
the Westward Southbound early tomor
row morning.
The Humboldt, arriving from the
South this morning will sail South at
8:30 tomorrow morning.
The City of Seattle, arriving from
the South this morning, is scheduled
to sail South from Juneau tomorrow
night.
The Matiposu will arri%-e from the
South tonight at 8:30.
The Al-Ki is scheduled to si I South
tonight at 6 o'clock.
The Northwestern ,'s v. ipocted to ar
rive from the Westward Monday.
The Georgia sails for Sitka tomor
row night at midnight.
The Seward left Seattle yesterday.
The Alameda sails from Seattle
Tuesday.
The Princess May leaves Vancouver
today.
The Dolphin leaves Seattle today.
PERSONAL MENTION
?+?
Dave Terwilliger arrived home from
Ketchikan on the Jefferson.
Robert Bell, the well known Excur
sion Inlet cannery man. arrived in Ju
neau on the tender Mercury today.
LEAVING ON MARIPOSA.
The following have booked passage
on the Mariposa for the Westward:
For Skagway ? Mrs. George Magee.
Mrs. E. T. McBrien; for Valdez?G.
Baldwin; E. S. Bruner. M. Nichols and
wife. O. Thorson. J. P. Stewart: for
Seward?E. S. Hewitt. E. B. Wilson,
J. F. Warner. Harry Wickert. Cora
Wickert. M. J. McLeod. L. N. Gordon.
Don't work yourself to death. Spend
a pleasant evening with the boys at
Burford's. 2-16-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?62.
Minimum?14.
Clear.
j AGAINST INVISIBLE
! PROPERTY TAX
?
The Juneau city council last night
' in special session decided that stocks,
bonds and other invisible property
' would not be assessed for municipal
? taxes. City Assessor J. A. McKanna
' was uncertain as to whether or not he
' should assess this class property and
1 asked Mayor John Reck for advice and
the matter hence the council was
called in special scssioii to act on the
matter.
Awarded to Worthen Mills.
The Worthen Mills was awarded the
contract for furnishing the city of
Juneau with lumber for the next 12
months. The bid calls for the delivery
of spruce lumber at $14 per thousand
feet board measure and Pugct Sound
flr at $15.25 per thousand feet board
measure.
Other Matters.
The bor jf City Treasurer B. M.
Behreuds ..ere approved.
Mayor lteck ordered that bonds be
furnished by both the city clrek and
the city wharfinger.
A BETTER REMEDY .
THAN NASTY SALTS
Few people like to take physic, es
pecially salts, because they are so dis
agreeable to take and because of the
griping and pains they cause. Rexall
Orderlies enable you to take less phys
ic. and all without griping, purging or
excessive looseness Salts and harsh
physics usualy give only temporary re
lief and often leave the bowels worse
off than before.
Rexall Orderlies move the bowels
promptly, and soothe, tone and
strengthen the intestinal muscles,
leaving them healthy and regular in
action. They taste like candy, and the
movement they cause is as easy and
natural as though your bowels were in
perfect health and you never had to
take any physic at all. We have so
much faith in Rexall Orderlies that wo
urge you to try them with the under
standing that, If they do not satisfy
you in every way. -.11 you have to do
to get your money back is to tell us.
We honestly believe them to be the
best bowel remedy made. In vest
pocket tin boxes; 10c, 25c, 50c.
You can buy Rexall Orderlies only
at The Rexall Stores, and in this town
only of us.?Wm. Britt. Druggist, Ju
neau and Skagway.
"THE MAN FROM HOME"
WILL ATTRACT MANY
?+?
A great deal of interest is being
taken in the play which is to be given
at the new Juneau theatre next Wed
nesday night under the auspices of the
Ladies' Guild of Trinity Episcopal
church. Booth Tarkinton's popular
four-act comedy. "The Man From
Home" will be presented. Those who
have seen the play declares it to be
one of the most churmirg productions
ever witnessed, and the very best dra
matic talent has been secured in order
that the people may be given a worthy
presentation of the famous play.
Reserved seats may be secured at
the Postotlice store on Monday morn
ing, and general admission tickets will
be on sale at Burford's, the Hotel Cain,
Alaskan hotel and Occidental hotel.
"THE INVADERS"?Three-Reel Fea
ture?Grand Theatre.
The big. exciting. Indian . ir pro
duction la a strong jui from
the history of Custer's ~ast. Stand.
This feature drama is a thriller. You
all know Custer's Indian war history;
this is the most important and the in
teresting part of Gen. Custer's fights.
You cannot afford to misS it.
"The Thief," a strong Solax drama.
You have something to learn from this
picture.
"The Pretty Girl in Lower Five," a
good Thanhouser comedy. A good
show tonight.
HUMBLODT ARRIVALS.
The Humboldt, arriving from the
South this morning, brought the fol
lowing passengers for Juneau: From
Seattle?F. G. Backner, Mrs. H. Lar
sen. Mrs. C. K. Anderson, J. Reid, T.
Mair, C. Martino, P. Carnilo, C. Car
nilo. L. Shelby, F. Bishop, P. Otness,
and ten second class; from Ketchikan
?Mrs. Ora McKin, George S. Murphy,
Mrs. B. Stedman, Marshal H. L. Faulk
ner and ten prisoners.
MINING CLAIM PATENTS HERE
The local land office is in receipt of
patents for five lode mining claims
for the Three Men Mining company in
the Valdez district.
Patents are also here for the own
ers. known as the Mansfield Mining
company, of eight lode mining claims
near Lemon creek.
KATALLA COMPANY PATENTS.
Two patents are in the local land
office for the Katalla company granting
title to two soldiers' additional home
stead filings, one for a tract of 40
acres, and the other for a tract of 60
acres, all of which is in the vicinity of
Eyak lake.
ELKS TO ATTEND FUNERAL.
Members of Juneau Lodge No. 420,
B. P. O. E.. will meetin Elks' Club
tomorrow at 1 p. m. for the purpose of
attending the funeral of Raymond
Miller.
Have some fun! Tickle the ivories
at Burford's. 2-16-t?.
I
CAMP FIRE GIRLS
GIVE GOOD SHOW
A large audience was present In
Elks' hall last night- to witness the
tlrst public performance of the cere
monies of the first" camp fire" by the
Juneau Camp Fire Girls and their affil
iated sisters, the Juniors and Bluo
birds. The entertainment was In many
respects a pleasing rovalatlon to the
greater number of those present. It
brought out the procepts and teach
ings of the organization in a marked
degree beside being Instructive was
highly entertaining, reflecting great
credit on Miss Kempthorne who organ
ized the affiliated societies and con
ducted the performances of last eve
ning.
Miss Kempthorne, guardian of the
organization, delivering a very interest
ing address setting forth the aim of
the affiliated societies, and the work
that was hoped to be accomplished in
betteriug conditions under which girls
grow into womanhood, laying consid
erable emphasis on the present Ill
equipped schools and the great need of
providing gymnasiums, swimming
tanks and other adjuncts for health
giving exercise.
A very attractive feature of the en
tertainment was the folk dances of
the Camp Fire Girls In the camp fire
scene. The girls were trained espe
cially for this occasion by Miss Le
vina \Vill8on, and they fully appreciat
ed the value of having one with them
who Is so willing to train them In
these charming dances.
Each little actress performed her
part In an artistic manner, that betok
ened conscientious training, and each
number was warmly received.
iuc iu) o>iiipnuii, uuuyu, iiiu HIoi
musical number, was presented by the
following members of the Camp Fire:
Suzanne McLaughlin, Anna Dudley,
Mercury and followed by others as fol
Georgia Caro, Anne McLaughlin, Ha
zel Jaeger, Helen Troy; assisted by
Mr. Samuel Shudshift and Mrs. George
Simpkins, first and second violins, and
Miss Alice Margrie at the piano. Miss
Edith Kempthorne conducted.
The Song of the Planets, presented
by the Bluebirds, made a great hit
It was led by little Miss Fay Thane, as
Mercury and fololwed by others as fol
lows: Venus, Francis No well; Earth,
Irene Nelson; Mars, Eva Tripp; Moons
of Mars?Virginia Shattuck and Nettie
Larson; Jupiter, Nadja Kashaveroff;
Moons of Jupiter?Marjory Renison,
Betty Ward, Marion Belle Pond, Mar
garet Shattuck; Neptune, Jean Stev
ens: Moons of Neptune?Lucille Bathe
and Madeline Valentine; Uranus, Ve
netia Pugh, Geraldlne McLaughlin.
The Juniors presented the splendid
little allegorical play, "Everygirl" in a
faultless manner. The story of the
problems that each girl must meet at
the early stage of young womanhood
and the lesson of the play were
brought out strongly with an artistic
touch that showed careful training.
Tho play was presented by the follow
ing: Hope, Myrtle Jorgenson; Mirth,
Gertrude Nelson; Wealth, Lillian Lar
son; Beauty, Suzanne McLaughlin;
Knowledge, Florence Larson; Work,
Mable Bathe; Health, Madge Case;
Love, Mary Kashaveroff; Everygirl,
Rose McLaughlin.
Judge R. A. Gunnison delivered a
short address in the interval preced
ing the finale, explaining in part the
work of the affiliated societies and the
good that would result.
The camp fire scene near the end
was very well done, the fancy dancing
being particularly pleasing. The
sceno closed with a song, "The Booga
Man." '
The chairs were removed at the
close of the performance and dancing
enjoyed until midnight.
"DISPATCH" TO BECOME
MORNING PUBLICATION
The Dispatch, which has occupied a
place In the evening field In Juneau's
newspaper world for many years, will
become a morning publication begin
ning next week. After the issuance of
the edition for this evening, the Dis
patch will not appear again until next
Tuesady morning, and thereafter It
will be published every morning of the
week except Monday.
The United States cablo office at Ju
neau will remain open until 11 o'clock,
Juneau time, in order to furnish the
Dispatch with the Associated Press dis
patches covering the field until nearly
midnight, Seattle time.
TENDER ADMIRALTY
GOES TO NUSHIGACK
The Northwestern Fisheries com
pany has chartered the cannery tend
er Admiralty of the Gambler Bay can
nery which is not operating this sea
son and will send it to Nushigak. The
crew to take charge of the vessel will
arrive in Juneau on the Mariposa to
night.
Juneau Drug Co., Phone 250. "The
Store that has what you want?when
you want It." We guarantee every
thing coming out of our store. Money
refunded if not satisfactory. Opp.
Alaskan Hotel. 5-7-tf
SKATING, SUNDAY?Jaxon's Rink.
Skating will be indulged in Sunday
at Jaxon's rink. The winning base
ball team will skate free. 5-8-2t.
FOR RENT?Newly furnished rooms,
close in, by day,week or month. Quiet,
cleani ail outside rooms. Bath rates
reasonable, at 212 Ferry way. 6-8-tf
The Jelly crowd, the good smokes,
the pleasant play will make you happy
day by day. Play pool at Burford's
and take the kinks out of your liver.
2~lg-tt
Bump the balls ? BURFORDS.
FAULKNER ASKS FOR
CANNERY PROTECTION
i United States Marshal H. L. Faulk
i ner has asked the Department of
? Justice to provide police protection to
i the 47 canneries of Southeastern Alas
- ka, and those living in their vicinity,
and other outlying points. He has
called attention to the fact that many
i crimes, including a half-dozen or so
homlcldos, have taken place within
tho last few years among the mixed
populations of the various outlying can
neries, and strongly urges that a gas
oline boat, with a deputy marshal and
a court commissioner be provided to
mnintain a patrol service among them.
In writing, Marshal Faulkner calls
attention to homicides that have taken
place at Dundas Ray, Rose Inlet, Hunt
er's Bay, Quadra and Chatham, all
within the last two years.
He says, further, the illicit sale of
intoxicants to the Indians employed
at tho canneries, is carried on by oth
er employees without restriction; and
this is accompanied by the usual ef
fects of drunkenness nnd debauchery."
In support of his request, Marshal
Faulkner says that under the law and
regulations he has no authority to in
cur any expense in the prevention of!
crime or in the maintenance of peace. I
Inclosed with tho request addressed
to the Attornoy-Goncral was a list of
the_47 canneries, in several of which
200 people aro employed arid the crews
of ull of which are "made of a great
many different nationalities, such as
Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Mexicans,
Filipinos, Portuguese, |Koreans and Ha
waiians, most of their brought from
the slums of San Francisco, Portland
and Seattle."
He says "many crimes are commit
ted every season; but Rowing to the pe
culiar conditions, the! mixture of the
lowest classes of so rohny different na
tions. and the distande of the canner
ies from the nearest peace officers,
Justice is seldom administered."
?-Hf?
FORMER PASTOR Of CHURCH
NOW IN SHOW BUSINESS
HAINES. May 6.-J&ev. A. F. Mc
Lean. formerly pastor of tire Prosby
terlan church at this'place, will con
duct the Gross motion^ picture show at
Haines, succeeding C. Campcn, who
has severed his connection with the
institution, and, with Mrs. Campen left
for Herron, Wash., where they will
reside in the future. Mr. and Mrs.
Campen made many friends here dur
ing their residence at this place who
regret that they have loft the city.
Items of Interest.
Ira H. King has qualified as town
treasurer by filing his official bond and
outh of office, which have been ap
proved by the town council.
Councilman B. E. B.Mion has charge
[of the ropair work of the streets and
has a largo force at work with thres
teams, leveling and graveling. He is
making a good showing.
Tom Valeur returned from White
horse last Saturday, where he has
been for the last three of four months.
He had a severe spell of sickness
while there, but Is now about well
again .
AT THE ORPHEUM.
Tonight the following interesting
program will bo shown.
"The Black Trackers" shows how in
the wilds of Australia a white trader's
narrow escape from a treacherous
death is avenged by his native black
friends. This is enacted by Aborigin
al natives.
"The Face at the Window" is a Kal
em drama of the woods.
"The Two Brothers" is a Mexican
drama, by the Vitagraph Co., and
shows clever George Stanley in the
role of the Two Brothers.
"Tight Wad's Predicament" is a
farce comedy by the Blograph Co.
Should Sunday be a rainy day there
will be a matinee at 2:30; otherwise
go to the ball game.
Sunday and Monday.
Pathe Weekly?Always Interesting.
??TUa. (n Af tliAOA
iuc i vi uuii in uuc ui IUWWJ
dramas by the Edison Co. and with
Marc McDermott in the lead. It is
sure to be good.
"When They Were Kids," is a com
edy drama by the Pathe Co. and shows
how an old couple look back upon the
romantic days of their youth, and by
allowing their memories full sway
find themselves back in colonial days,
principals in a delightful childish love
story.
"Mary on the Stage" is the third of
the What Happened to Mary series,
and those interested ill the story pub
lished in the Ladies' World should not
miss seeing this.
"Cinderella's Slipper" is a comedy
by the Vltagraph Co., with Maurice
Costdllo and Lillian Walker in the
leads.
Look for our next feature.
WE SAY POSITIVELY
that our drugs are absolutely pure and
undiluted. Our reputation as reliable
druggists has been earned by supply
ing only tho best and purest of medi
cines. Is It likely that we would spoil
it by selling you anything less perfect?
Well, hardly. Dorans Prescription
Pharmacy. Phone 3. 5-5-tf.
ST. GEORGE HOUSE.
Everything new. Good light and
well ventilated rooms. Baths, electric
light. Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day, week
or month. 4-18-tf
MR8. A. E. HOULIHAN.
MILLINERY ARRIVALS.
Mrs. Sherman at 131 Front street
announces the arrival of the extreme
summer styles in millinery. Must be
seen to be appreciated. Some especial
ly rare bargains in Spring styles for
Saturday and Monday only.
1
FAULKNER IS SAID
TO HAVE RESIGNED
It Is persistently insisted by those
in official circles that United StateB
Marshal H. L. Faulkner, for the First
Judicial Division, has forwarded his
resignation to the Attorney General at
Washington, and notified the Depart
ment that he desires to be relieved
front duty June 1st.
Mr. Faulkner refused to be quoted
when asked concerning the report. He
would not confirm or deny it.
MAY ABOLISH
CHUGACH FOREST
WASHINGTON, May 9?The Sen
ate committee on Territories has or
dered & favorable report on the bill
restoring to the public domain the
Chugach National forest. There was
no opposition to the bill the committee,
but It may be opposed on the floor
of the Senate.
PRIZE COUPON TAXING
BILL GOES OVER
WASHINGTON, May 9.?Represen
tative Oscar W. Underwood's bill tax
ing coupons and premiums offered by
concerns as an aid to sell their goods
has been put over to the December ses
sion. The bill was aimed especially
at tobacco companies.
TOMORROW'S BALL GAME
WILL DRAW BIG CROWD
Everything is In readiness at Rec
reation park and the first baseball
game of the 1914 season between Doug
las-Treadwell and Juneau-Gastineau
promises to attract a large attendance.
Never in the history of baseball in Al
aska has there been two teams of such
merit and strength as now represent
the communities on either side of Gas
tlneau channel. Special ferry service
will be put on to accommodate the
crowd of fans from Sheep creek and
the Island. Juneau fans will, of course,
be out in force.
The management expects every
adult who attends the games to pay
an admission charge of 25 cents, which
goes into- the maintenance fund.
The game Btarts at 3 p. m.
RAYMOND MILLER'S FUNERAL
TO BE AT 2:30 TOMORROW
?4-?
The funeral services foar Raymond
Miller will take place at 2:30 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon at the Presbyter
ian church. Music will be provided by
the Presbyterian church choir. Class
mates of Raymond will serve as pall
bearers.
MONTANA MINING CO. FILES.
Articles of incorporation for the Mon
tana Mining company of Juneau were
filed with Charles E. Davidson, Secre
tary of the Territory this morning. The
incorporators are Harry II. Williams
and W. A. Irwin, both well known min
ing men of Juneau, and Robert E.
Coughlin, a well known Douglas busi
ness man. The capital is named as
$200,000.
LEAVING ON JEFFERSON.
The Jefferson, leaving for the South,
took the following passenger from Ju
neau: Por Seattle?G. Blomskog, T.
Kunde, P. C. Lacey and wife, Saide E.
Edmunson, C. C. Georgeson and wife,
Mrs. L. Buchanan; -for Ketchikan?R.
Kennedy, W. Jones, J. Fram .
MASONS ATTENTION.
Stated communication Mt. Juneau
Lodge No. 147 will be held Monday
evening May 11 at 8 o'clock, in Odd
Fellows' hall. Work F. C. degree. Vis
iting brethren cordially Invited.
5-9-2t. E. D. BEATT1E, Secy.
CAPT. NILSEN HERE.
Capt. A. Nilsen, superentendent of
the Dundas Bay cannery of tho North
western Fisheries company, arrived in
Juneau this morning on tho cannery
tender Spencer, Capt. James Cunnane.
Capt. Nilsen came over to meet his
sister who is expected to arrive in Ju
neau on the Mariposa tonight.
JUNEAU THEATRE.
A specially attractive bill will be
offered at this house on Friday and
Saturday evenings, at 7:30 and 9 o'
clock:
"She Will Never Know," the story
of a worthless father's sacrifice for
his only child.
"Tom Blake's Redemption," J. War
ren Kerrigan In a thrilling railroad
story.
"When the Worm Turned," an amus
ing tale of the sordid greed and tyr
anny over his family of a farmer of
tho old school, and the wlfo's clever
ruse to circumvent It.
"The Mutual Weekly," a wonderfully
interesting and Instructive panoramic
view of recent happenings of world
Interest, in this country and the lead
ing capitals of Europe.
Sunday's Program:
There will bo an entire change of
program for Sunday evening. Tho fol
lowing will be offered:
"f'ct Rich Quick," a farco comedy
alone Wallliicford lln*s.
"The Strange Way," a molodrama
with Isabel Lamon and George Selg
man as stars.
"Veteran Mounted Police Horse," an
Intensely interesting story illustrating
the wonderful intelligence of that no
blest of animals?the horse. This is
a feature picture in two full reels.
Admission, 25c; children, 10c.
DR. ROBT. SIMPSON RETURNING.
Dr. Robert Simpson will return from
a professional visit to Ketchikan on
the Mariposa tonight.
COURT OfflCIALS
COMING TONIGHT
Marshal H. L. Faulkner arrived from
Ketchikan on tho Humboldt this morn
ing bringing word that court was ex
pected to adjourn last evening and
| that the court officials will return to
Juneau on the Mariposa tonight. Dis
trict Attorney John Rustgard left for
Seattle from Ketchikan on the South
bound Spokane.
Brings Prisoners.
Marshal Faulkner brought a bunch
of prisoners sentenced to serve time In
the Federal Jail in Juneau.
The prisoners were: Fred Smith and
Harry Cleveland, of Haines, each of
whom drew a sentence of one year
for burglary; John O'Brien of Skag
way, 3 months for selling liquor to
Indians; Tom McDonald of Douglas,
also 3 months for selling liquor to
Indians, and Simon Aquio of Wrangell
6 months for a like offense; Joe Souza,
D. E. Kinnlnook, JJeorge Murphy, of
Ketchikan each drew one year, anil
W. Hetman also, of Ketchikan, six
months for burglary; Harry Klmma of
Ketchikan got six months for assault
with a deadly weapon.
TAMPICO IS WORLD'S
GREATEST OIL FIELD
NEW YORK, May 9. ? Tampico,
which Is bolng beseiged by the Rebels
and practically blockaded by the
American navy, is the center of the
world's largest oil field. The Tam
pico field alone has more than 6,00,000
acres of oil land, more than half as
great as the combined oil fields of the
United States. There are three com
panies operating at Tampico each hav
ing an acreage as great as that of
the California oil fields.
SAM GUYOT AND
BRIDE ARRIVE HOME
?+?
Samuel Guyot and his bride arrived
on the City of Seattle today and will
establish their home in Juneau. They
were married in Portland, Ore., on
April 29. Mrs. Guyot Is one of the
most charming young women of the
Oregon metropolis and will be warmly
received by Juneau society. She was
formerly Miss Ellen Margaret Sulli
van.
TORPEDO BOATS MAY
USE PANAMA CANAL
?+?
PANAMA, May 9.?Col. G. W. Goe
thals, Governor of the Panama Zone,
says torpedo boats can be put through
the Panama canal at any time. A
barge lino through the canal will be
opened today.
ANOTHER RICH STRIKE
IN CHISANA DISTRICT
CORDOVA, May 3. ? Olaf HJolm
was an arrival from the Chisana on
yesterday's train, having departed
from the diggings last Sunday. He
states that when he left there were va
rious rumors concerning a rich 3trlke
that had been made on claim No. 1
abovo Skookum, a tributary to Little
Eldorado. This property was located
by Bud Sargeant and is now being
worked by Charley Range and others.
Mr. Hjelm passed the claim on April
21 and says that they were then cross
cutting the narrow creek with the
use of a boiler, and were in pay. Be
fore he left the diggings the report
was that Range had panned $36 out
of the bottom of a shaft not Digger
than a Yukon stove and six feet deep.
There was considerable excitement by
reason of the new find.
MR. AND MRS. McADOO ARE
AT SUMMER WHITE HOUSE
CORNING. N. H., May 9.?Secre
tary and Mrs. William G. McAdoo are
spending their honeymoon here at the
Summer White House, the summer
home of Winston Churchill, occupied
last summer by President and Mrs.
'Wood row Wilson.
SENATE AND HOUSE OFFICIALLY
RECOGNIZE MOTHERS' DAY
WASHINGTON, May 9.?The United
States Senate agreed yesterday to a
House resolution requesting the Pres
ident to issue a proclamation hereafter
making the second Sunday in May
Mothers' Day."
COTTON MANUFACTURERS
OPPOSE COTTON EXCHANGE
NEW YORK, May 9.?The American
Cotton Manaufactuers' Association,
adopted a resolution urging the aboli
tion of the New York Cotton Exchange
unless it can be so regulated by Con
gress as "to compel it to perform its
proper functions."
PHYSICIAN SAYS FRANCIS
JOSEPH NOT IN DANGER
VIENNA, May 9?Dr. Kerzl, phy
sician to Emperor Francis Joseph, has
written to a friend at Budapest scout
ing the alarmist reports of the dang
erous condition of the Emperor's
health.
Whether you like Havana or domes
tic cigars, you can get the kind you
like at Burford's. 2-16-tf.
huerta Will See Mexico
Burn Before Resigning
VERA CRUZ, Mex., May 9.?Mexi
cans arriving from Mexico City say
that Gen. Huerta has no intention of
abandoning the Presidency. They
quote him as making the statement
that the capital would be in ashes be
fore he left it.
Opposition to Reinforcements for Fun
ston.
WASHINGTON, May 9.?Tho Pres
ident's Cabinet is divided as to the
necessity of sending reinforcements to
Gen. Funston at Vera Cruz.
Gen. Funston is said to have de
clared that he needB 15,000 men to hold
Vera Cruz.
Germans Sending Arms to Huerta.
WASHINGTON, May 9.?The Navy
Department has received a report that
two German vessels loaded with arms
and ammunition for Huerta are bound
for Puerto Mexico, Bouth of Vera Cruz.
An effort will be made through the
State Department to have the German
government prevent the landing of the
cargoes.
American Deserter Killed.
VERA CRUZ, Mex., May 9?A Mex
ican railroad mun has announced that
Private Parks, who disappeared from
tho American lines into the Mexican
with two horses belonging to officers,
believed to have deserted, had been
put to death near Tejera.
Mayflower to Meet Death Ship.
WASHINGTON, May 9?Secretary
of the Navy Josephus Daniels said this
morning that the President's yacht
Mayflower will meet the armored crui
ser Montana with the Vera Cruz dead
on board, and accompany the vessel to
New York.
FunBton Praises woman lor snooting
For Country.
VERA CRUZ, Mez., May 9.?A Mex
ican woman who had been arrested and
charged with "sniping" American blue
Jackets and marines yesterday was
guilty by a court martial and sentenced
to six months in jail. She was re
leased by Gen. Eunston's orders. He
said: "I'm for any woman with ncrvo
enough to shoot for her country."
Villa Holding $2,000,000 Worth of
Cotton.
TORREON, Mex., May 9?Cotton to
the value of $2,000,000 seized by Gen.
Villa at this place from Spaniards will
be held here until the Rebels capture
Tampico when it will be Bhlpped to
Europe via that port
EARTHQUAKE KILLS
HUNDRED IN ITALY
CANTANIA, Italy, May 9. ? More
than 100 persons were killed and a
dozen villages in the vicinity of Mt.
Etna were destroyed by earthquakes
last night and this morning.
Mt. Etna is in eruption, and the dis
turbances In the volcano are believed
to have caused the severe shakes.
The whole population in the vicinity
of Mt. Etna is terror stricken.
WHEAT CROP WILL BREAK
ALL AMERICAN RECORDS
WASHINGTON, May 9.?Statistics
received by the Department of Agri
culture indicate that the winter wheat
crop of the United States will amount
to 630,000,000 bushels this year?the
greatest wheat crop ever grown in the
United States. This exceeds the crop
of last year by 107,000,000 bushels.
Late rains indicate that the corn,
oat and spring wheat crop will be nor
mal at least.
M'ADOO IS AFTER
INCOME TAX EVADERS
? ?
WASHINGTON, May 9?To detect
evaders of the Income tax, Secretary
of the Treasury William G. McAdoo
has directed Commissioner William H.
Osborn of the internal revenue to se
cure information relative to stock
holdings of all citiens and residents of
the United States. Blank forms have
been prepared to secure a complete
return of the information desired.
MINE WORKERS VOTE
DOWN GENERAL STRIKE
?+?
INDIANAPOLIS, May 9.?The Inter
national Executive Board of United
Mine Workers of America yesterday
voted down the proposition for a gen
eral strike.
The large majority cast against a
walk-out, pending negotiations on new
wage contracts, by the bituminous coal
miners, 89, 524 to 52,067, was largely
responsible for the position of the ex
ecutive committee.
WOMAN SUFFRAGISTS
ASK FOR AMENDMENT
WASHINGTON, May 9. ?Thous
ands of women suffagists paraded on
Pennsylvania avenue this morning to
the capital. Each Congressman was
presented with a petition requesting
the passage of the resolution provid
ing for the submission of a Constitu
tional amendment granting votes to
women.
AMERICAN CATHOLICS
NUMBER OVER 16,000,000
NEW YORK, May 6.?The annual
statement shows that there are 16,067,
980 Catholics In the United States,
and 14,651 Catholic churches.

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