OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 09, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-06-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 489. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 1914 ? PRICE, TEN CENTS
- rz r_ ~~ ~ * j ~
Empress Of Ireland
May Be Raised
QUEBEC, via Prince Rupert, June
9.?It is understood that the same firm
employed in raising the battleship
Maine Is sending divers to the Em
press of Ireland wreck. A wrecking
outfit is already on the scene. The
vessel has a million and a half of
treasure aboard. Divers will go after
this and at the same time are to make
a survey and determine upon the pos
sibility of raising the vessel.
Storstadt Sues C. P. R.
MONTREAL, via Prince Rupert.
June 9.?The owners of the collier
Storstadt have entered n counter
claim against the Canadian Pacific
railway for $50,000 in connection with
tho collision of the collier and the
Empress of Ireland, alleging negli
gence in the navigation of tho Em
press. The C. P. R- claim against the
Storstadt. on the other hand, is for
$2,000,000. 'Each of the captains of
the vessels maintains he followed the
correct rules laid down, thus putting
the blame for the accident upon the!
shoulders of the other.
Passengers Fought With Knives.
QUEBEC, via Prince Rupert. June
9.?The inquest held into the circum
stances connected with the death of
the victims of the Empress of Ireland
indicates that there was a most ter
rible scene enacted on the vessel be
fore she went down. The victims
were caught in a trap and a fierce
fight occurred as the steerage passen
gers. particularly, fought for their
lives.
It is learned now from an examina
tion of the victims whose bodies have
been recovered that more than nine
tenths of them did not die from drown
ing. They lost their lives from other
injuries.
Wounds have been found on many
which indicate that they were inflict
ed with knives. To substantiate this,
these weapons were found in the
clenched hands of the victims.
EXCITING RACE FROM
PARK TO STAMPEDE
Frank Andrew was the winnor of
an exciting race Sunday afternoon
from Recreation Park to the Stam
pede Restaurant
No one knew anything about the
event except those who happened to
see a banner which was carried about
the grounds during the bail game,
which was to the effect that the one
reaching the Stampede first, starting
after the ball game was over, would
get a prize of $5 and the second one
in a prize of a meal ticket. Forrest
Richardson came in second.
About thirty boys tcok part in the
marathon and the winner was crowd
ed so that he was exhausted for 30
minutes after the finish.
SAMPSON DUE HERE AT
TEN O'CLOCK TONIGHT
The Admiral Sampson left Ketchi
kan late last night and will arrive
here about 10 o'clock tonight. After
discharging a heavy cargo of freight
she will sail to the Westward in the
early morning.
Geo. J. McCarthy, the popular agent
fo.* the Pacific Alaska Navigation Co.
(Admiral Line) accompanied by Mrs.
McCarthy, will be a passenger on the
Sampson, making the round trip to
the West coast towns in the Interests
of his company.
NEW RESTAURANT WILL
OPEN FOR BUSINESS TONIGHT
Ben Hersey and Pete Olson, two
well known restaurant men of Juneau
who in the past have been running the
Pioneer RestauranL will open their
new cafe in the new Goldstein build
ing on lower Front street tonight. The
new room has been fitted up in first
class style with all the modem con
veniences and is in keeping with the
present growth of the city.
NEW SHOOTING GALLERY
TO OPEN HERE SOON
?+?
W. J. McDonald of the Juneau Paint
Co., will open a shooting gallery on
Front street in the room formerally
occnpicd by the Central Cafe. Mc
Donald is having repairs made to the
place and expects to open for busi
ness in a few days.
A TRIP TO SITKA FOR $15.00.
? ?
Steamship Al-Ki will make the Sit
ka run. leaving Juneau Saturday, June
13. returning Monday, June 15. A
good chance to see Sitka and spend
Sunday out of town; ample time will
be given to see all points of interest.
Fare, including berth and best of
meals, only $15.00 for the round
trip.?Allen Shattuck. Cheney Bldg.,
Agent. John Henson & Co., Douglas
Agents. 6-9-4t
WANTED ? One thousand suit* ?
to clean, press or repair. We call and
deliver. Shearers Pressing Parlors;
128 Front street, phone 242.?5-15-lm.
ARE YOU SUFFERING?
The Veedee Vibrator will cure you
Only two left. Special price $15.00
each at JUNEAU DRUG CO.. 107 Front
SL Phone 250.
The Georgia arrived from Skagway
at noon today, and will sail for Sitka
tomorrow at 8 a. m.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maxinum, 67.
Mlnlnum, 44.
Clear.
BISHOP ROWE
OUTLINES HIS PLANS
?+?
Bishop P. T. Rowe, who arrived In
Juneau Saturday night on the Georgia
from Sitka, and conducted services
at this place and Douglas Sunday ex
pects to leave for Seattle Friday on
the Princess May. Later, he will re- ,
turn and devote August and Septem
ber to the missions of Southeastern
and Southwestern Alaska, not going
Into the Interior until November.
While In Seattle Bishop Rowe will
meet jand ^onfer with Archdeacon
Hudson Stuck. Rev. Mr. Lumpkin and
other missionaries, who will come
North this summer to relieve those
who are now on the ground doing
work for the Episcopal church.
Archdeacon Stuck has been travel
ing in the East and in Europe since
early last fall. Ho will come North
at an early date and resumo his work
among the missions of his church in
the Yukon valley and other sections
of the Interior.
Rev. Mr. Lumpkin will accompany
Archdeacon Stuck North, and relieve
Rev. Charles E. Bettlcher, who has
been in charge of the church at that
place for several years. The latter,
at the Instance of the Bishop, will
make a tour of the States, and lecture
on Alaska during the coming year.
Among those whom Bishop Rowe
will coufer with at Seattle are two
young ladies who will come North to
do missionary work at Fort Gibbon
aud Tanana Crossing.
Two New Hospitals.
Bishop Rowe says two new hospitals
will be established In the Interior this
year, each to cost approximately $7,
000.
Bishop Rowe will go to the Interior
via Cordova, the Copper River rail
road and the Fairbanks trail.
MISSING TACOMAMYN
ON WAY SOUTH
Wenzel Hodcr, whose wife recently
died at Tacoma, and whose two daugh
ters, aged 15 and 11 years, have been
trying to locate him in Alaska, was
discovered a few days ago by Chief
of Police W. H. McBride, of Juneau,
who informed him of the conditions
that had developed at Tacoma. Mr.
Hoder left on the Admiral Evans
Sunday for Tacoma to get his children
and caia for them.
Mr. Hoder had been employed at
Juneau, and had not heard from bis
children for sometime.
The Empire received a letter in tho
last mall from Richard Bushell, editor
of the Ketchikan Miner, asking that
assistance be rendered in locating Mr.
Hoder. Tacoma parties had written
Mr. Bushell. Chief McBride had al
ready located the missing mnn, how
ever, and he was on his way home.
ROAD FUNDS SHOULD
BE AVAILABLE EARLY
Thousands of dollars are being lost
to the camp this spring through the
failure of the government to provide
adequate funds for the repair of the
roads and trails throughout the dis
trict at a time when repairs are urg
ently needed. We appreciate the fact
that the government has done very
much for Alaska in the way of provid
ing funds for the construction of a
railroad, and it is not our wish to ap
pear ungrateful in calling attention
to the pressing need which now con
fronts us. We merely mention the
condition of the local roads in the
hope that a way out of the difficulty
will be found if the proper authorities
at Washington are appraised of our
plight.
We do not believe that It is the in
tention of Congress or the administra
tion to abandon the wagon roads in
Alaska now that It has been decided
to build a railroad. It must be recog
nied by the officials at Washington
that the Importance of our highways
will be enhanced by the building of
railroads, and we feel sure that the
time will come when there will be
many times more money expended an
nually in improving and extending the
wagon roads than has been spent in
the past. But there is an immediate
need, and because there is not now
money available for the work, the
business and development of the camp
are being retarded.
Not only that. The failure to make
needed repairs at this time will nec
essitate the expenditure of a much
larger amount of money and labor
later in the season, and if weather
conditions are not favorable later on,
it will be impossible to repair the
damage which has resulted from the
spring snows and water.
The local representatives of the
road commission are doing what they
can to put the roads in condition for
use. They doubtless will make their
limited funds go as far as possible
toward relieving the situation. But
they can not improve conditions much
until additional money is available,
and it Is with the object of hastening
another appropriation that we mention
the matter at this time. The need is
urgent, and it will be money saved
to the government if the additional
work is authorized in time. ? Fair
banks Times.
FOR PEOPLE WHO KNOW
?*?
Stationery that shows individuality
at JUNEAU DRUG CO 107 Front St.
A package of initials repousse free
with each box. Phone 250,
JONES MAY BECOME <
FISHERIES HEAD
Dr. E. Lester Jones, deputy United
States Fish Commissioner, who in i
now onroute to Juneau and who will t
devote the next four months to an in- t
vestlgation to the Ashing Industry of t
the North, may succeed to the head t
of the fisheries bureau, according to I
Washington newspapers. 1
A recent Washington Post says: (
"Dr. E. Lester Jones, of thiB city, t
may be named by President Wilson t
to succeed Hugh M. Smith as Com
missioner of Fisheries in the Depart- ?
ment of Commerce. Mr. Smith is a |
holdover, having been deputy commis
sioner in the Taft Administration. Dr.
Jones is at present deputy commis
sioner.
"Dr. Jones leaves this week for Alas
ka, where ho will make a four months' .<
study of the salmon industry along I
the Pacific and Boring sea coasts. A
number of restrictive measures re- 1
lating to the salmon industry are 1
pending in Congress. The trade of t
Alaska amounts to $16,000,000 a year, <
and the Administration is suspicious 1
that there is considerable waste.
"For some time there have been re- '
ports of friction in the Fisheries Bu
reau."
Dr. Jones Will arrive hero on the Ad- s
mlral Sampson, and will join the <
United States fisheries boat Albatross. s
* * ? i
DOUGLAS WOMAN SEEKS t
HUSBAND IN FAIRBANKS
The district marshal's office is in 1
receipt of a comunicatlon from *
Mrs Alice Pettygrove who resides I
at Douglas, Alaska, asking if any I
Information can be given her con- i
corning her husband, who came to I
this country sometihing like two years <
ago. His name is Frank.
She states in the letter that she (
heard through a friend that her hus- ?
band was in Fairbanks Fourth of
July last, but had heard nothing since
that time. He is said to be going by
the names of Jim Kennedy and Frank
Williams and is described as a man
with light hair and of a stout build. (
She says he Is fancy dancer and a 1
good entertainer. A wife and child '
await his return to them or word '
of some sort from him.?Fairbanks
News-Miner. "*
SKAGWAY AND HAINES
MERCHANTS JOIN ASSOCIATION J
C. S. Lindsay, Alaska manager for J
the Commercial Credit Rating Asso
ciation, who is organizing a branch of ,
tho service In Alaska that will prob
ably be called the Alaska Business
Men's Credit Association, returned on
the Dolphin from Skagway and Haines.
He says at the two towns 22 business <
houses agreed to become members of '
the organization. The total member- i
ship has now grown to approximately i
seventy-five. 1
? ? ? ? i
SEWARD REAL ESTATE 1
IS LOOKING UP
?+?
Tho most Important real estate
transfer that has occured for several
months was closed last night when |
Joe Morris and William Devine purch
ased the Palace rooming bouse and ]
bar from Charles Tcckllnberg for $10,- |
000.
The building will be renovated j
throughout, steel ceiling \vill be put In ,
the bar room and a new front install
ed.?Seward Gateway. i
MRS. SMITH SAYS SAMUELS I
HAD FINANCIAL TROUBLES I
?+?
Mrs. Blauche Smith, who was held \
at Seattle by the police awaiting the
result of the coroner's Jury invcstlga- I
tlon Into the death of M. D. Samuels, i
testified that he had committed sul- i
cide on account of financial troubles. ]
She said that ho had commented upon
his domestic troubles, but that he had
denied that there was any quarrel be
tween Samuels and his wife.
SKAGWAY SHIPS rLOWERS
TO PUGET SOUND CITY
??
Last year Alaska got not a little
notoriety through the shipment of
vegetables to the Seattle markets for
sale. This year, the shipments.South
Include flowers. C. O. Walker, of
Skagway, received an order last week
from Seattle for pansles, and prompt
ly filled the orders according to the
Skagway Alaskan.
JUNEAU THEATRE.
?+?
Tonight's bill consists of "The
Greatest Love," a clever tale of the
unsuccessful attempt of a lover to
fasten a crime on his rival.
"The Heritage of Eve," by James K.
Clifford, in two parts; a story of the
workings of the socret service men
in the Civil War.
"The Tell-Talo Light," which amus
ingly depicts how the tables were
turned on the "Purity Squad."
Two shows nightly. First show at
8 o'clock. Four changes of program
weekly. Admission, 25c; Children 10c.
SKAGWAY SUICIDE BURIED.
?*?
F.VD. Mooro, tho Skagway restaur
ant man who committed suicide at
Skagway Friday, was buried at that
place Sunday.
Moore was a member of the Arctic
Brotherhood and Eagles. With his
wife, who survives him, he had lived
at Skagway about a year, coming to
that place from Carcross. whore ho
had been employed by the White Pass
as a cook.
FOR SALE?Lot 34x38 tide flat.
Improvements. -Apply on premises.
8th and E Sts., Tide Flats. 6-9-2t
BEST GOODS?best service at the
Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front St. Im
mediate delivery day or night. Phono
250.
WOMAN HOUNDS
SAMUELS TO SUICIDE
SEATTLE, Juno 9.?The police have
'ecelved information from Juneau
ending to show that M. Dl Samuels
iad committed sulcli)e because of a
hreat made by the Smith woman to
iave him prosecuted for violating the
ilann white slave act through his re
ations with her unloss ho securod a
livorce from his wife and married
ler. Samuels received Buch informa
ion from a Juneau business associate.
HOONAH QUARANTINE
IS RAISED TODAY
Gov. J. F. A. Strong today issued an
>rder raising the quarantine hereto
ore established against Hoonah.
Dr. Wllberforce, the physician who
iad charge of the smallpox cases at
ioonah, camo to Juneau yesterday on
he cannery company's boat Vis, ac
ompanied by the nurses, MisBes Ran
tin and Storer, who had been in at
endance upon the six persons suffer
ng from the disease.
Dr. Wllberforce said that the in
fected rooms have been fumigated
ind that there was no danger of an
>ther outbreak of the disease in Hoon
ih. Tho cannery has resumed oper
itton nnd business is going on there
ho same as before the infection.
Superintendent Clarcnco Alexander
>f the cannery co-operated with Dr.
iVilberforce in evcrypway to prevent
i spread of the disease and directed
hat the cases be isolated and every
>recautlon taken to prevent the In
Hans from coming in contact with the
rersons or premises who had been
exposed.
SENATOR BRUNER
LOSES MONEY ROLL
Senator Elwood Brunor lost a purse
:ontaining $400 In bills or large dc
lomlnations and a draft for $600
lrawn In his favor by tho Commercial
National Bank, of Washington, while
n Skagway on his way to Nome via
he Wlilto Pass route.
Senator Bruncr did not tarry on ac
:ount of the loss, but left the matter
n tho hands of Senator J. M. Tanner,
rhe latter has offered a reward of $50
'or the recovery of tho money and
lraft.
DEMOCRATIC CLUB
WILL MEET TONIGHT
There will bo a meeting of the Dein
jcratic Club tonight at Gross hall
rhe meeting will be an important ono
is many matters of Importance con
tectcd with the comitfg political cam
palgn will bo taken up for consider
itlon. It is desired that thero be n
large attendance.
GRAND THEATRE.
Same good pictures tonight as last
night.
"From tho Wilds,, ? Tho primitive
law and civilization and good play ol
the wilderness.
"A Woman of no Importance'*?A
play that will hold you with tho great
sst interest.
"Wanted?A Wife"?A Reliance plaj
and a good one too.
"Tommy Becomes a Toreador"?
daumont good comedy?a little laugl
that will hold you awhile.
Tomorrow's big prize winning fca
turc.
"The Golden Wedding,,?This fea
ture won the first prize of 25,000 franci
at tho Turrin Motion Picture Contesi
pf 1913, and it will surely interest the
people in Alaska.
TONIGHT AT THE ORPHEUM
"Seeds of Silver" is a Sclig drama
depicting the redeeming quality o
love.
"Angel Cake and Axel Grease" is i
laughable comedy euro to please, b;
the Lubin Co.
"Tho Magic Shoe" will show yoi
how happiness may be wished upoi
you.
"Skylock" adapted from Shake
spearo's "The Merchant of Venice" Ii
an elaborate production in two part;
magnificent settings, correct costura
ing, supert acting. Every scene i
marvel of the producer's art.
COMMERCIAL CLUB TO MEET
There will be a special Fourth o
July meeting of the Commercial Clu'
at the City Hall Tuesday evening
June 9th, at 8 o'clock, in union wit]
the mnsB meeting called by the Cit;
Council to consider the question o
celebrating tho Fourth of July.
H. J. FISHER, President.
I. SOWERBY, Secretary.
MAKING GREAT PROGRESS
ON GOLDSTEIN BUILDINI
Concrete is boing poured into th
walls of the Goldstein building, an
the progress of tho work is llmite
only by the capacity of the team
that are hauling gravel, at which wor
practically every avallablo team is bi
ing employed.
Night crews are working, so ths
the building Is progressing ever
hour of the 24. It is hoped to hav
the structure completed by Septemfc
first.
A regular communication of Junes
Chapter No. 7, O. O. E. S., will I
held in Odd Fellows hall, Tucsda
June 9, at 8:30 p. m. By order of tl
W. M.?Ora Morgan, Sec. 6-8-:
FOR RENT ? Unfurnished foi
rooms and bath.?Pettlt & Harvey.
BRYAN'S EDM UK IU ,
RUN FOR GOVERNOR
OMAHA, Neb., June 9.?Richard L.
Metcalfe, of the Panama canal com
mission, formerly associate editor of
Bryan's Commoner, has peclded to ac
cept the petition that has been filled
to havo his name entered as a can-, |
did&to for thc(Democratlc nomination;
, for Governor. '
**++++*+*++++****
+ ?
* FIRST OCEAN 8HIP + ,
+ USE8 PANAMA CANAL * ,
+ ? ,
+ Panama, June D.?The flm ? s
+ passage of an ocean ship * <
+ through the Qatun locks was + f
* successfully accomplished yes- + 1
+ terday whon the Panama Rail- + l
* road steamship Allowance, 4,- + j
+ 000 tons register, was passed * <
* through. + j
* +
[tt + + + + + 'l"5' + 4' + + + + + 4 |
I
LANE'S PROGRAM
COUNTS FOR PROGRESS
Thoro Is sound sense, practicability
and constructive statesmanship In r
the suggestion made by Secretary (
Lane for the creation of a commls- ,
slon, to take charge of all of the re- (
sources of Alaska, to do that work ,
well In that territory which Is now ,
done badly or not done at all by half (
a dozen or more different government- t
al agencies, all limited in what work ]
they can do by the constant necessity
of referring everything to bureau of
ficials in Washington City. . I
In the form of a report made to the
senate and the house committees on
territories Secretary Lane marshals
the arguments in favor of his scheme. ?
The real recital In this report of the (
manner in which matters affecting
Alaska aro now parceled around
among the different bureaus and de- J
partments. Is a sufficient argument in
Itself for tho adoption of some simple, A
t comprehensive and workable plan, and ,
. he has outlined such a plan.
There should scarcely be any ques
tion that all matters affecting the pub- ,
, lie domain should bo administered, (
not alone In Alaska but everywhere
else, by one bureau of one department <
. of tho general government. The forest- J
. ry service belongs to and should be ,
entirely under the jurisdiction of the
i interior department, for ono thing. ?
But as fair as Alaska Is concerned,
all tho matters affecting it nnd the ,
development of its resources should |
be left under the control of a single
, commission of competent men, on (
the ground, with full pbwer to act, un- ]
hampered by the bureaucratic meth- ,
? ods of Washington City, but free to t
? deal with every situation as they find
, it. This is the diametric opposite of
? the bureaucratic mothods under which '
- Alaska has been bottled up for so
? many years and that very reason af
i fords a strong argument for it. Secre- (
tary Lane's report on tho subject
,should bo conclusive and congress
should act upon his recommendations,
which have already been embodied in
? bills now before congress. ? Seattle
PoBt-Intelligencer. i
> ? * ?
r I FIRE BURNS FOUR
BUILDINGS AT LATOUCHE
SEWARD, June 3.?Four buildings
were destroyed by Are at Phoenix,
near Latouche, on tho night of May
26. Tho flro originated in "Billie"
Little's saloon and spread to I. L. Kim
' ball's store and two small residences.
Oto Little, brother of the saloon
keeper, was asleep in the building
when the flro started at 12:16 in the
morning. He had a narrow escape
' from being overcome by smoke. He
fired soveral shots to arouBe the nelgh
5 bore, but the flro had gained too much
headway to be controlled. Kimball
devoted his time to saving $3,000 worth
of furs he had In the attic and lost
his store stock.
The total loss on all four buildings
? is estimated at about $8,000.
Kimball started the first grocery
1 store in Soward eleven years ago, and
f moved to Latouche about seven years
ago.?Seward Gateway.
l ?
1 "MASHER" CONTRIBUTES
TWENTY DOLLARS TO CITY
9 Elmer Ostrom, who testified that he
s has been In Juneau about a month,
was convicted In Judge E. W. Pettlt's
1 court this morning of the charge of
annyolng young girls and fined $20
> and costs, which he paid.
Ostrom was accused of following
young girls around on tho street, and
f starlng'at them. He had followed two
I, of them to their homes from down
, town this morning, according to the
U testimony, and when tho girls came
y out of their home' and went to the
f City Hall to notify Chief of Police Mc
Bride of tho unwolcomo attentions
thoy were receiving he followed them
there and waB still staring at them
when placed under arrest.
, JUNEAU "MIDGETS" DEFEAT
J DOUGLAS AT BASEBALL
The Juneau "Midgets," an aggre
j gatlon of young Americans under 14
d years of ago, under the management
R of Joe McLaughlin, Sunday defeated a
k slmlllar organization of Douglas boys
, by a score of 14 to 11.
? $ ? 0 ?
lt TAX EQUALIZERS JN SESSION.
y The board of equalization is In ses
"c slon today with Mayor Rock, councll
,r men Willis, Fries, Walland and Brltt
constituting the membership, assisted
by Assessor McKanna and Clerk Pet
tit.
iu ? ? ?
)e OTTO SWANSON BURIED.
Tlio body of Otto Swanson which
10 was found on tho boach near Grlnd
21 stone and brought to Juneau Snturday
night by John Johnson and Tony Kelly
Jr and taken to the C. W. Young under
(f taking parlors was interred at four
o'clock yesterday afternoon.
ben. Huerta Abandons!
The Blockade Stuff
FREE TOILS REPEAL ,
UP TO PRESIDENT |
WASHINGTON, Juno 9.?The com
iromiEc proposition that tho free tolls (
?opeal bill shall be passed with an (
intendment saying that tho United (
States does not walvo the right to
Hscrlmlnatc in favor of American 4
ihlps has been submitted to President ^
IVoodrow Wilson. It Is believed that 4
to will accept It readily, as he has 4
ilways contended that tho question 4
)f tho legality of the act is of second- ..
iry importance. H
SEE EARTHS CENTER ;
WITH WIRELESS:
?+?
GOETTINGEN, Germany, Juno 9.? *
The society for the investigation of
he internal structure of the earth an- i
tounced yesterday that It had sue
:eeded in discovering by means of
vircless telegraphy subterranean
iprlngs and oro deposits, nlso their i
lepths by the use of electrical waves t
tccordlng to a method invented by \
ProfeBBor Lcimbnch. (
f
PRINCESS ALICE IS .
COMING NORTH j
In addition to its regular Northern 1
lervlce the Canadian Pacific Steam- c
ihip company has decided to place Its <
lew and palntial steamer Prificess I
Mice on the Alaska run for at least t
'our trips this summor. Tho Princess
Mice will cater particularly to the ex- {
mrsion traffic, though she will carry t
ill passfingers desiring accommoda
ions. i
The Princess Alice will Ball from
Vancouver on her first Northbound \
rip June 26, going to Skagway and, (
?cturning, she will sail from Juneau, <
southbound, July 2. Other sailings
'rom Vancouver will be July 10, and <
14, and August 7.
The Princess Alice Is one of the
lowest of the fleet of modern pnssong
;r vessels operated by tho Canadian
Pnciflc in North Pacific waters, and i
like most of tho others, she was built i
in the Clyde in Scotland, and is mod- 1
?rn In every respect. A handsome ob- '
jervation room, large and luxuriously i
rurnlshed salloons and staterooms are i
features of the vessel.
The Princess Alico has been operat- |
ed on the route between Vancouver
and Victoria.
GRANITE GOLD MINE
PRODUCES $500 DAILY i
VALDEZ, June 4. ? Superintendent
W. R. Millard, of the Granite Gold
Mining company, reached Valdez last
evening with $6,000 worth of gold bul
lion, the result of . 13 days' run with
the small Lane mill on the claims.
Three nuggets worth about $11 each
were also brought to Valdez, having
been found on the outside of the Lane
rotary and were saved as specimens.
? Superintendent Millnrd also reports
that the development work is demon
strating the fact that tho ore body
is larger than at first expected; that
it carries high values and that the
property is certain to become one of
the largest producers In this section.
The ore body is 14 feet wide and
tho company have blocked out ore
enough to run tho mill for a year
and further development work is con
templated and the extent of tho ore
body is to bo demonstrated.
Senator B. F. Millard is tho prin
cipal owner of the Granite Gold Min
ing company. J. E. Chilberg, of Seat
tlo, and Jafet Lindeberg, of Nome, are
associated with him.
? - ? ? ? ? ? t J. .1. j. i J. i A
??? V V V V V T ....
.J. J*
* PERSONAL MENTION *
? 4
? ?? + + + + + ?<? + ? + ? + ?
H. R. Plate is a Juneau visitor from
Auk Bay. He is registered at the Al
askan Hotel.
A. E. Hnrris, traveling passenger
ngent of the Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul Railway, is a guest nt the Al
askan hotel.
Dais Cunningham, special agent for
the Standard Oil Co., arrived in Jun
eau yesterday nnd will look after bus
iness here for his company. He Is
registered at the Alaskan.
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Carpenter and
Master Hary Olds made a pleasure
trip to Auk Bay Sunday.
Geo. D. Magee of Skagway has Just
received the appointment of traveling
auditor for the White PasB railway
and will leave soon for a trip down the
river to St. Michaels. Upon his re
turn ho will be Joined at Fairbanks by
Mrs. Magee and the two will spend
the senson in that city until fall.
F. Mitchell of Atlln, B. C.. Is a Jun
can visitor and is a guest at tho Alas
kan hotel.
H. F. Dott of Sheep creek camo up
last evening to visit frlonds at the Al
askan hotel.
, t 0
j FOURTH OF JULY
MEETING ON TONIGHT]
Thero will be a mass meeting of the
citizens with Juneau, the City Council
and the Chamber of Commerce at the
City hall tonight to discuss the Fourth
of July celebration.
ROOSEVELT RIDES INTO
MADRID WITH KING
MADRID, June 9.?Former PresN
dent Theodore Roosevelt arrived here
yesterday. He Journeyed from Bar
ritze on the same train with King Al
? fonso. Each was unawaro of the
pthers presence aboard.
WASHINGTON, Juno 9.?The Span
sh Ambassador notified Secretary of
Jtato William J. Bryan that Huerta
las abandoned tho plan to blockade
Tamplco with Mexican warships.
Gunboats Return.
Messages from Admiral Badger to
lay say that tho Mexican gunboats
hat had sailed for Tamplco are re
urnlng to Puerto, Mexico.
!? + + + '
? ?
b MEXICAN KILL8 LIEUTEN- *
b ANT. ?
S- ?
I- Washington, Juno 9.?Second +
b Lieut. F. H. Houston, 29th In- ?
k fantry, stationed at Vera Cruz, ?
I- was shot and instantly killed ?
k by a drunken Mexican whom +
h he sought to arrest after the ?
!? latter bad stabbed him. *
b ?
-5- + 4. + + + ?
\LASKA TOURISTS GET
SEATTLE'S ATTENTION
SEATTLE, June 4.?Local newspa
>crs devoted considerable space to Al
iHka on the front page yesterday, in
vhlch they told of the trip of the Pa
:lflc Alaska Navigation company's
juests.
Tuesday night the guests attended
1 farewell dinner on the Sampson. C.
3. Hyde of Tacoma acted as toast
naster and there were many speeches
jy tho guests. All expressed them
iclves as satisfied with tho North
:ountry and resolutions were passed
hanking President Alexander, Cap
aln Zim Moore and the crew.
The guests then signed a petition to
Secretary Redfield asking that a light
ihip be stationed off Capo St. Ellas.
The guests of President H. F. Alex
indcr, upon tho arrival of tho ship
at Seattle, presented Capt. Mporo
vith a pair of marine glasses and
2hlof Engineer Noon with a marine
dock.
SEATTLE'S ASSAY OFFICE
SHOWS BIG GAINS
?*?
SEATTLE, June 4.?Remission of
issay charges have boosted receipts
it the local ofllce to $8,000,000 In bul
lon during the past eleven months.
The receipts for the same number of
months previous to the new order
imounted to $5,000,000.
ROYAL PLAYERS PLEASE
ANOTHER BIG AUDIENCE
The Royal Players played to a
crowded and pleased house again last
night when "The Girl of the Golden
West" was presented at Elks' hall,
MIsb Elliott made a delightful "Roxie
Tremnini," and Mr. Royal and Mr.
Howland handled difficult parts In a
masterly manner.
The Royal Players appear at Doug
las tonight and Wednesday an^Thurs
day. They open a return engagement
at Juneau in "The Bishop's Carriage"
Friday.
GAYNOR'S ESTATE DECREASED
WHILE HE WAS MAYOR
NEW YORK, Juno 3.-^Tho late
Mayor William J. Gaynor's estate was
probated today and found to amount
to only $750,000. He lost considerable
money by neglecting his business
while mayor.
' ' " I
SAMPSON TO TAKE
MATANUSKA COAL SOUTH
SEATLE, Juno 9.?-The coal mined
by the government at Matanuska last
winter for the purpose of making a
test will be brought to Seattlo on the
Admiral Sampson on her present trip
from the North.
LATOUCHE BRINGING MEAT
FOR HUNGRY ALASKANS
SEATTLE, Juno 9.?Tho Steamship
Latouchc saild least night for the
North with 700 horses, cattle, sheep
and hogs for different sections of Al
aska.
U. S. SUPREME COURT
UPHOLDS STATE COURT
?+?
WASHINGTON, Juno 9. ? The Su
premo court yesterday affirmed tho
decree of the Missouri State Supreme
Court ousting the International Har
vester company for violating the
State's anti trust law.
+ + + ???? + + *
*p
* MARINE NOTES +
<? ?
**+**+?+????+???
MARINE TAOINNNN
The City of Seattlo sailed from
Seattle for the north Sunday night and
is due to arrive here early Thursday
morning.
The Jefferson will sail from Seattle
tonight for the north and should reach
here early Saturday morning.
The Al-Kl is due to arrive in port
from tho South Friday morning.
The Northwestern Is duo from Seat
tle at five o'clock tomorrow morning
and sailg to the Westward tomorrow
morning.
The Admiral Sampson Is due from
the South at ten o'clock tonight and
will proceed to the Westward about
eight o'clock in the morning.
The Alameda is due to arrive from
1 tho Westward at ten or eleven o'clock
1 tonight, sailing south one hour later.

xml | txt