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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 16, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 495. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, JflNE 16? 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Wickersham Announces
Candidacy For Re-Election
The mail from Washington this
morning brought the announcement of
tho candidacy of Delegate Jas. Wlck
ersham for re-election to the fourth
term as Delegate from Alaska. The
announcement does not state whether
Judge Wickersham will make his cam
paign as the candidate of any of the
political parties or as an Independent;
however, as the letter Is addressed to
the people at large and places no limi
tations or qualifications upon his can
dacv. ti may be taken for granted that
he is an independent candidate, but
that he would accept the endorsement
of such political organizations as
might agree with his position on the
issues of the day. which are set forth.
The Delegate announces that he will
support the progressive Alaskan policy
of President Wilson In case he is re
elected. and enumerates the things
that he will work for.
Text of Announcement.
The following is the text of Delegate
Wickersham's announcement:
Washington. D. C.. June 4th, 1914.
To the People of Alaska: I shall
be a candidate for re-election as Dele
gate from Alaska at the November
election. This announcement is made
upon the request of many people in
Alaska, and because my duties as your
Representative in Congress prevents
me from coming home at an early date
to make It In person.
In case of ray election in November
It will bo mv purpose to work for Con
gressional enactment:
1. In support of the progressive
Alaskan policy declared by President
Wilson in his message to Congress.
December 2d. 1913.
2. To continue appropriations in
aid of government owned and operat
ed railroads in Alaska.
3. To secure better administrative
control over railroad and steamship
lines in Alaska, a reduction of the
present confiscatory rates, and perma
nent dissolution of the monopoly,
which has so long controlled transpor
tation facilities in Alaska in violation
of the Sherman act.
4. To secure an additional appro
priation of $450,000 for the Immediate
completion of the capitol building at
Juneau, and other appropriations for
other needed public buildings in Alas
ka.
3. To secure the construction of a
safe and suitable harbor at Nome, and
the improvement of Dry strait.
6. To secure the passage of a fair
coal leasing bill so the mines may be
immediately opened for development
without monopoly.
7. To secure appropriations for aids
to navigation, and for roads, trails and
bridges.
8. To protect our fisheries from de
struction and moponoly. and to compel
them to pay their just proportion for
the support of Alaskan government.
9. To create the commission form
of control in the administration of na
tional affairs in Alaska, so that our
public lands, fisheries, coal mines,
forests, roads, game. Indians, and edu
cational. charitable and penal institu
tions may be managed in Alaska by a
single commission headed by Alas
kans.
10. To procure the reservation of
sections 16 and 36, in each township
of public lands surveyed, for the sup
(Continued on Page 4.)
****************
* *
+ MARINE NOTES +
+ +
The Northwestern is due to arrive
from the Westward about the 18th.
The Dolphin sailed from Seattle last
niKht for the North.
The Georgia arrived from Skagway
at one' o'clock yesterday afternoon and
sailed for Eitka at four o'clock this
morning.
The Spokane is due to arrive from
the South tomorrow.
The Al-Ki arrived from Sitka at six
o'clock this morning and sailed South
one hour later.
The Mariposa arrived from the
South at three o'clock this morning
and proceeded to the Westward at
9:30.
The Delhi is due from the South
tomorrow.
The Alameda is scheduled to sail
from Seattle the 18th.
The Admiral Evans is due from the
South Thursday.
The Admiral Sampson is due to ar
rive from the Westward Thursday.
The Humboldt arrived from Skag
way at eleven o'clock this morning,
proceeding South at one o'clock.
DRAPER CLUB MEETS TOMORROW
*
The Draper Club will meet tomor
row (Wednesday) afternoon at 2:30
o'clock with Mrs. J. L. Gray.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?76.
Minimum?70.
Cloudy.
Precipitation?.03.
CARLE C. JAMESON
WEDS IN ST. PAUL
Karle C. Jameson, formerly city ed
itor of the Dally Dispatch of Juneau,
and Miss Harriet May Hervison, daugh
ter of a prominent merchant of North
4(acGregor. Iowa, were quietly mar
ried In St Paul, Minnesota, on Friday,
June 5th, according to the St. Paul
Pioneer Press, which contained men
tion of the nuptials. Mr. and Mrs.
Jameson are at home in Charleston,
West Virginia, where Mr. Jameson is j
city editor of the Daily Mail, owned
and published by former Governor
Walter E. Clark of Alaska. Mr. Jame
son is a brother of Mrs. Herbert L.
Faulkner, of Juneau.
The bridegroom met the bride in Se- i
attle two years ago while she was.
West on a visit. When Mr. Jameson;
recently went East he took passageI
from Seattle on the Northern Pacific's j
North Coast Limited. At Billings,
Montana. Miss Hervison met him and
the ceremony was performed the next
day in St. Paul, the ev. Dr. Grata of
the First Methodist church officiating.
The wedding will come as a com
plete surprise to Mr. Jameson's local1
friends. As The Empire predicted,
when Mr. Jameson left Juneau, it Is
believed he will return North at some [
future date, to re-locate here.
*******?{>******* +
* *
+ FOURTH OF JULY ?>
+ MEETING TONIGHT +
? ?
? Pursuant to call dt Chairman +
? Hirsch. Of the 4th of July ex- +
? ecutlve- committee, there will ?
4- be a meeting of that and other +
?> committees at tho city hall at +
+ eight o'clock tonight. The com- +
? ing two days' celebration will +
+ be discussed in detail. +
?> +
? + + + + + lt + 4 + 444"<' + + +
* * * : I
ELKS' DANCE LAST NIGHT I.
WAS A GREAT SUCCESS ,
L
The Elks' dance last night at Elks'' ^
hall was one of the most delightful so-1 ^
clal events that have ever been given! (
by that order that never does anything ]
that it does not do well. The beautl-1 (
fully dcorated hall and handsomely j
gowned women presented a picture
not soon to be forgotten. The attend- j |
ance was large, and everything possi
ble was done for the comfort and !
pleasure of the guests. Electric fans j (
kept the air in motion; ices and punch I
were served, and notwithstanding that;
the night was warm, the hall was |
comfortable and the evening enjoyed. 11
The music by Prof. Sumpf's ten-piece;
orchestra, was doubtlessly the best
dance music ever heard in Juneau. (
"FORTY-FIVE MINUTES FROM 1 <
BROADWAY" GIVES PLEASURE
?*?
The production of "Forty-Five Mln- <
ites from Broadway" by the Royal i
Players last night at the Juneau thea- (
tre was splendidly received by a well- j
Gelled house. Tho comedy was do- >.
lightful. l
The Royal Players will appear at <
Douglas tonight in "The Bishop's Car- 1
riage."
. (
ALMA ON RUN TOMORROW
?NEW SHCEDULE SATURDAY
+
The Juneau Ferry and Navigation I?
company's new and fast motor ferry <
Alma will go on the Juneau-Oouglas- j
Treadwell-Thane ferry run tomorrow. ]
A new schedule, effective Saturday, j
will be announced tomorrow. The Al- j
ma is much faster than the Lone Fish- s
erman and the schedule has to be re-!;
arranged for her. She has a capacity j
of 250 passengers. ! I
MISS CARO ENTERTAINS FRIENDS
Miss Georgia Caro was hostess forj*
a theatre and dancing party last Fri- t
day evening at the beautiful home of: <
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Caro <
on the Salmon creek road. About 25
of the young people attended the Or
pheum early in the evening, and later
were taken to the Caro home by auto. 1
There was dancing until midnight,
when supper was served under ? the
trees. The evening was delightfully
spent. i(
? ; I
THEVOGUE (
New location; Seward, near Third; I
phone MRS. ALBERT BERRY
?6-lS-tf.
JAXON'S RINK. , ;
There will be skating Wednesday i i
and Sunday at Jaxon's rink.
Judge and Mrs. Roebrt W. Jennings j
and their daughter, Miss Cordelia Jen-; !
nings, left on the Mariposa for Skag-1
way, where Judge Jennings will hold!
court this week. Miss Cordelia Jen- ]
nings arrived on the Mariposa from (
Seattle, and proceeded with them to 1
the Lynn canal metropolis. t
[C J. SKUSE GETS
PATENT EOR HOME
C. J. Skuse who has for a number
of years boen conducting a ranch at
Mendenhnll river and aupplylng Ju
neau and a number of outside places
with vegetables from his homestead,
has boen granted a homestead patent
to his lands. His entry consists of
151 acres at Mendonhall and is one
of 23 clatmB in the forest reserves that
were thrown open yesterday and re
stored to entry In the Chugach and
Tongass reserves.
A patent has also been Issued to the
PacI lis American Fisheries company
for 94 acres on the east side of Excur
sion Inlet, as a soldiers additional
homestead.
The land office has recommended
that patent to the Feed group of coal
claims bo repected. This is a group
of coal claims eight in number In the
Bering river district. These claims
were sold by the original locators to
a company known as the Alaska An
thracite Coal company of eight stock
holders, who paid for the claims near
ly $10,000. The company applied for
patent, and the government charges
that tho original locators made un
lawful location in that they all agreed
to let their agent Freed have an In
terest in the locations, or that their
several interests constituted realy a
common Interest, and that they did
not open or Improve a coal mino on
each of the locations. The decision
Is that the government has failed to
prove any of the charges of fraud, ex
cept that one of tho claims was locat
ed solely in the interest of tho agent
Freed, who admits tho charge, and
that nono of the locators at the time
of location had opened or improved a
coal mine. The decision was one that
was controlled by tho hearing in the
Cuuningham and James Wardell cases.
F. P. McDonald acted as agent for the
purchasers. The land office has rec
ommended that the applications for
patent be rejected.
FIRE DESTROYS
CHURCH PARSONAGE
VALDEZ, Juno 16.?Fire this morn
ing destroyed the parsonage of the
Congregational church at this place.
The pastor, Rev. Charles Price, Mrs.
Price and their five children barely es
:aped with their lives. The preacher,
not knowing that all the children had
Bscaped tried repeatedly to re-ontcr
the burning building. It required four
men to prevent his running into cer
tain death.
The loss is $3,000.
EXCELLENT PICTURES TONIGHT
Grand Theatre.
An entire change of program, com
:omprising some of the best reels:
"The Homestead Race," an exciting
Vmcrican Western proudction.
"His Wife's Affinity," depicting n i
story in which wife sends an actor a!
tote, and the result.
"Frau Van Vinkler's Crullers," an
)ther good Majestic play.
"Modern Cindrella, Gaumont com
edy.
SEIZE IT
)r you will lose the opportunity. Now
s the best time to buy Juneau real
jstate. Prices will never bo lower
ind there is every indication of a
sharp advance in the near future. I
lave Borne splendid business and resl
ience locations, and a few good bunga
os. Prices and terms on application.
?61-15-tf. GEO. F. FORREST.
3DDFELLOWS ATTEND
MEMORIAL SERVICES
The Odd Fellows attended memorial
icrviccs at the Presbyterian church
Sunday evening and listened to an in
:eresting and instructive sermon by
Rev. John B. Stevens. Miss Alice Mar
gie presided at the piano, and her
flaying added much interest to the
jervices. Miss Margrle is a pupil of
Miss Kempthorne.
METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOL
OUT ON ANNUAL PICNIC
The Methodist church Sunday
school is enjoying its annual picnic
:oday at Nevada creek. The members
>f the school and their friends loft
>n the launch Pacific from the C. W.
Voung company's float at 9 o'clock,
rhey will return this evening.
MRS. ALEXANDER VISITING
FRIENDS IN JUNEAU
- ?*- -
Mrs. Clarence J. Alexander and
laughter, Miss Irene, wife and daugh
:er of the manager and superintendent
jf the Hoonah Cannery are visiting
friends in Juneau having boarded the
M-Ki at that point from whore they
went to Sitka and thence here.
Mrs. Alexander is given great credit
it Hoonah for her hard work and un
:iring efforts in helping to check the
spread of smallpox at that place this
Spring.
SUFFRAGETTES ATTACK
FAMOUS LONDON CHURCH
LONDON, June 16.?Suffragettes ex
ploded a bomb yesterday In St.
Seorge's church, Hanover Square, In
which Col. Roosevelt and Mrs. Roose
,-elt were married.
WRANGELL TO BE
FISH HEADQUARTERS
WRANQEI,L, Jung 16.?Dr. E. Les
ter Jones, doputy United States Com
miasloner of Fisheries, who Is in the
city, has recommended that Wrangell
be made the base of operations for
the Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska.
Dr. Jones has begun his fisheries in
vestigations in earnest. He will spend
the entlro summer in Alaska.
+ * + *
+ STICKINE STEAMER +
* BURNS AND SINKS *
+ +
+ WRANGELL, June 16.?The *
+ now Stlcklne river steamer Vcd- *
+ der, Capt J. T. Henloy, master, +
* caught Are and sank while on +
+ her last voyngo up stream from *
| + Wrangell to Telegraph creek. +
4> The crew was rescued and re- 4*
* turned to this place. 4>
+ +
+ + <, + 4'4' + + + 4' + 4ll,4'+ +
CONGRESS WILL PASS
ANTI-TRUST BILLS
WASHINGTON, June 16.?Leaders
of the Democratic side of the Senate
and House said Inst night that the ad
ministration anti-trust program will be
enacted into law before Congress ad
journs. It is believed that they will
be put through the Senate before the
middle of next month.
Senator Urges Adjournment.
WASHINGTON. June 16.?A letter
from Pres. Henry B. Leyland, of the
Cadillac Motor Car Co., of Detroit, urg
ing Congress to pack up and go home
and givo the country a rest, was read
to the Senate by Sonator CharleB E.
Townsend, of Michigan, who gave it
his endorsement.
EIRE ARMS SHUT
OUT OF IRELAND
DUBLIN, June 16. ?The King's
bench court yesterday decided that
the government's proclamation prohib
iting tho importation of flro arms and
ammunition into Ireland is valid.
MILES SAYS ROOSEVELT
WILL RUN AND LOSE
?+?
BOSTON, Mass., Juno 16.?Gen. Nel
son A. Miles predicts that Theodore
Roosevelt will make the fight of hiH
life for another Presidential term, and
that he will be the nominee of the Re
publican party, and that he will be ov
erwhelmingly defeated.
JUNEAU THEATRE.
After four nights given over to le
gitimate drama, moving pictures will
be shown at this house agnin tonight,
consisting of the following excellent
bill:
"The Shoemaker and the Doll," a
Thanhouser film.
"Mrs. Carter's Campaign," humours
ly depicting how a women was elect
ed Mayor of Cartersville.
"The Green Shndow," a Kay-Bee
drama based on the evils arising from
the "Greeney-Eycd Monster ? Jeal
ousy."
Two shows; first show at eight o'
clock. Admission: 25c; children, 10c.
UNKNOWN MAN SENT
TO INSANE ASYLUM
An unknown man, too insane to give
his name, from Hoonah, was commit
ted to Morningside Insane asylum by
Judge J. B. Marshall today. Ho was
brought from Hoonah by Bailey,
Knight and Olson In a gas boat and
turned over to the authorities last
night. It is thought he is a South
American.
JUNEAU'S VALUATIONS
NEARLY $3,000,000
Juneau has an assessed valuation of
$2,834,875.00. With the assessment
rolls carefully gone over," and the
work of the equalization board com
pleted, City Clerk E. W. Pettlt this
morning compiled the tabulation and
finds that the city of* Juneau has an
assessed valuation of $2,834,875.00. Mr.
Pettit says that "subsequent checking
may change the amount by a few dol
lars, but the above figures are sub
stantia^ correct.
A WOMAN WITHOUT A MAID.
"Just look at my hands" is the de
sponding cry of nearly every woman
who does her own house work. But
the woman who uses "Perfection
Cream" need not worry. It softens
and whitens the skin. 25 cent bottles
at the Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front St.
Phono 250. 6-15-tf
PIONEERS ATTENTION.
The regular meeting of Igloo No. 6
will bo held at Odd Fellows' hall, Tues
day evening, June 16,1914, at 8 o'clock.
All members are requested to attend.
CEDRIC DAMS,
?6-16-11. . Secretary.
REBEL ATTACK AT
MIACATECAS TAILS
MEXICO CITY, Juno 16.?don. Bar
i ron has telegraphed to this city that
i ho has won an eight days' battlo with
1 tho Constitutionalists at Miacatccas.
He places the loss of Constitutional
ists In tho several attacks on tho Fed
eral defenses at 3,000 men.
Villa May Join nl Attack.
SALTILLO, Mox., Juno 16.?It Is re
ported here that Gen. Villa may take
personal command of the attack on
Miacatocas and Zacetacas. He lias
been forwarding rolnforcomcnts.
Gon. Villa authorized the statement
that tho attack will not be abandoned.
THE DOLPHIN AND ADMIRAL
EVANS ON THE WAY NORTH
SEATTLE, Juno 16.?The Dolphin
and Admiral Evans sailed lor Alaska
last night The Dolphin got awuy at
9 o'clock and tho Admiral Evans two
hours later.
Dolphin's Passengers.
The following named passengers are
on tho Dolphin: For Juneau?J. C. To
wescr, John Mahor, Geo. Williams, H.
S. Snydor, J. Bornholfer, R. S. Fergu
son, H. C. Bowman, Mrs. F. A. Small,
Mrs. James Dickson, J. A. Rummol,
and two steerage:
For Douglas?Nels Anderson and 1
steerage.
Admiral Evans' Passengers.
Tho following named passengers are
on the Admiral Evans: For Juneau?
Mr8. Ostrom, W. L. Martin and wife,
F. Campett, R. N. Wolf. Budd Smith,
Miss Ida M. Orenshaw, Chas, Welford,
H. Peyser, Al. Carlson and wife, Mrs.
Emma Gray, Mrs. P. A. Nicholson,
Miss Nicholson, E. N. Nelson, Ida Hod
er, Mary Hoder, and five steerage.
For Douglas?M rs. Rattlkka.
CALIFORNIA ALIEN LAND
QUESTION UP AGAIN
?+?
WASHINGTON, June 16.?The de
mand of Japan for the reopening of
the California alien land question will
be considered soon according to a
statement made to newspaper men by
Secretary of State William J. Bryan
yesterday evening. The last Ameri
can note on the question was written
August 25th last
GOVERNMENT MAY
INVESTIGATE COLORADO
WASHINGTON, Juno 16?A Feder
al commission to settle the Colorado
strike troubles has been proposed to
President Woodrow Wilson by Sena
tor Robert L. Owen, of Oklahoma, who
announced his intention of introducing
a bill for such a body.
R. D. PINNEO MASONIC
LECTURER FOR ALASKA
j ?*?
SEATTLE, June 16?The Masons
of the State of Washington elected
R. D. Pinneo, of this city and former
ly of Alaska, grand lecturer for Alas
ka.
MRS. ELLA FLAGG YOUNG
FAVORS SEX LECTURES
CHICAGO, June 16. ?Mrs. Ella
Flagg Young, city superintendent of
schools, told the delegates to the Fed
eration of Women's Clubs this morn
ing that sex lectures to the school
children have proved successful. She
believes them to be very useful.
t t t
PRESIDENT APPOINTS
RESERVE BOARD MEMBERS
?+?
WASHINGTON, June 16. ? The
President yesterday sent the follow
ing names to the Senate for member
ship on the reserve board:
Assistant Secretary of the Treas
ury Charles S. Hamlin, Massachusets.
two years; Paul Warburg, New York,
four years; Thomas Jones, Illinois, six
years; Casper Miller, California, ten
years; Hardling, eight years.
E. C. Simmons, the St. Louis hard
ware man, declined an appointment to
the board.
AL-KI RETURNS WITH
8ITKA EXCURSION
Tho Al-KI arrived from Sltkn at
6 a. m. with her excursion party, and
sailed for the South with the follow
ing passengers:
From Douglas?H. Jones, Charles
I Wirbc, J. F. Blabon, Mrs. M. E. Rold
I man, Jacob Saasi, I. Saasi, E. J. Bar
tols, Mrs. E. J. Bartels and sixteen
steerage.
From Douglas?Mrs. Geo. A. Coffee,
R. W. Smith, Mrs. L. W. Foreman,
Mrs. H. V. Sulley, Dan Albna and tho
following to Ketchikan: Paul B. Im
pang and wife and Mark B. Craig.
SAILING ON HUMBOLDT.'
The steamer Humboldt arrived from
Skagway at 11 a. m. and proceeded
South at 1 p. m. The outgoing pas
sengers were: Dr. R. V. Ellis and wife,
Mrs. Clnra Magelssen, Miss E. Wal
lace. Fred Hinkle, J. C. McBride, Mrs.
A. E. Frost, Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Bakken,
L. E. Geary, Gus Jacobson, C. B. Tay
lor R. W. Buoll, E. E. Johnson, and
four steerage, all for Seattle. Miss A.
M. Jordlson was a passenger to Ket-!
chlkan. Thcro were five steerage for
Ketchikan and one for Petersburg.
CARRANZA MUST
SIGN ARMISTICE
NIAGARA FALLS, Canada, Juno 16.
?'.ho mediators yesterday evening
telegraphed to Gen. Carranza that
they would not admit his delegates
to the peace conference unless he
would sign an armlstlc pending the re
sult of mediation. He was Informed
that If he would agree to an armistice
that his delegates would bo received
on equal terms with those of the
United States and Huerta'B provision
al government.
Carranza and Villa May Break.
WASHINGTON, June 16?It Is re
ported that Carranza and Villa are on
the point of breaking on account of
the recommendation of the latter that
the Constitutionalists should do noth
ing that would offend the United
States.
WILSON STANDS TOR
RIGHTS OF MEN
WASHINGTON, June 1C.?President
Woodrow Wilson in a Flag Day ad
dress yesterday said:
"It is my privilego and right as a
representative of a Nation which does
as it pleases in its own affairs to say
it will always stand for the rights of
men when human liberty is at stake."
TERRIBLE STORMS CAUSE
GREAT DAMAGE TO PARIS
PARIS, June 16.?Thunder and rain
storms of terrific violence have drown
ed many people and caused great dam
ago to property in this city and other
points along the lower Seine. The riv
er overflowed its banks, and the tor
rents that were turned into the sewers
caused them to burst in many places.
Dozens of buildings collapsed as a re
sult of the wash of the water from the
ruined sewers, and people were crush
ed by falling houses.
PLANS PERFECTED FOR
PANAMA CANAL OPENING
*
WASHINGTON, June 16.?Accord
ing to the completed plans, President
Woodrow Wilson will leave hero with
a notable company of statesmen, rep
resenting the formal opening of the
Panama canal .March 15th next. With
members of his Cabinet he will be
on the Oregon which will head the
battleship procession of all the Na
tions through the canal to the Pacific
and on north to San Francisco.
FURTH DIVIDES ESTATE
AMONG HIS RELATIVES
SEATTLE, Juno 16.?Jacob Furth's
will was filed today. It gives his wid
ow the Barnaby country estate and
$10,000 to each of his grandchildren.
The remainder of his estate, valued
at $2,500,00, is divided equally among
his daughters, Mrs. Frederick C.
Struve, Mrs. Anna Furth Terry, and
Mrs. Lieut. WetheriU.
COMMISSION BEGINS
EMPRESS WRECK PROBE
?+??
QUEBEC, June 16.?Lord Mersey,
presiding, the Royal Commission be
gan the investigation of the Empress
of Ireland disaster today.
TURK7 MASSACRE 100
GREEKS AT PHOKIA
ATHENS, Juno 16?Greek refugees
from Asia Minor report that the Turks
have massacred 100 GrcekB Including
several priests at the town of Phokia.
TO BUILD ST. ELI AS
LIGHTHOUSE IF POSSIBLE
?4?
SEWARD, June 16. ? Capt. E. M.
Trott, general inspector of the light
house service, announced today that
a lighthouse will be built at Capt St.
Ellas if the men and material can be
gotten to the site to do the work,
which, ho says, is the most inaccessi
ble on the Pacific coast.
POLICE GUARD KINO AND
QUEEN FROM SUFFRAGETTES
LONDON, Juno 16.?One thousand
policemen and several hundred detec
tives assembled at the historic race
course to protect King George and
Queen Mary from suffragettes while
they were In attendance at the open
ing of the Ascot races.
SPECIAL TUESDAY AND WEDNES
DAY.
for the man who shaves himself. A
combination of our box of a D. S. shav
ing soap or powder, one box of Lilac
talcum and one bottle of Vogue Lilac
Vegatal for $1.00. . Regular price $1.25.
Juncan Drug Co., 107 Front street.
Phone 250. 6-15-tf
House keeping rooms for rent. Ap
ply Dr. R. C. Mathis, Douglas, 6-16-tf
Alaska Railroad Tax
Bill Turned Down
WASHINGTON, June 16.?Delegate
James Wickershum, of Alaska, yester
day afternoon endeavored to secure
the passage of the bill repealing the
1100 a mllle tax <jn Alaska railroads.
Representative Jeremiah Donovan,
Democrat, of Connecticut, objected to
unanimous consent, but withdraw the
objection at the request of Represen
tative William C. Houston, Democrat,
of Tennessee, chairman of the House
committee on Territories. The bill
was then attacked by Representative
Irvine L. Lenroot, progressive Republi
can of Wisconsin, who offered amend
ments tending to destroy the purpose
of the bill, and finally terminated the
proceeding under unanimous consent.
Chairman Houston and Representa
tive Walter A. Watson, Democrat of
Virginia, plead for the bill, but their
efforts were of no avail.
Fairbanks Postoffice Bill Falls Also.
The efTorts of Delegate WIckersham
to secure consideration of the Fair
banks public building bill met with
similar fate.
Special Rule May Be Asked.
The supporters of the bill repealing
the railroad tax and the coal lands
leasing bill are contemplated asking
for a special rule for their considera
tion. If that can be secured the bills
will pass. It Is believed that there will
be no chance to secure their consider
ation under a unanimous consent
agreement
STEWART EXPECTS PEACE
BUT IS PREPARING
?4?
WASHINGTON, Juue 16.?Gov. Sam
V. Stewart telegraphed to the Presi
dent last night, asking that troops be
held in readiness to be sent to Butte.
Gov. Stewart Does not Look for War.
BUTTE, Mont., June 16.?Gov. Sam
V. Stewart said today that he hopes
and believes that there will be an
adjustment of affairs here without the
intervention of troops. He said that
he has not decided to call out the Na
tional Guard or to ask for Federal
troops, but that his telegram to tho
President was merely precautionary.
A similar explanation was made of
tho order to various companies and
troops of the National Guard to be in
readiness for duty.
No New Outbreaks.
BUTTE, Mont., June 16. ? Whilo
there have been no new outbreaks
here, there Ib a feeling that trouble
might start at any time. Both tho
union miners and the insurgents are
in resentful mood on account of re
cent events.
SKAGIT COUNTY BANDIT ~
GUILTY OF MURDER
' ?
MOUNT VERNON, Wash., June 16.
?Charles Hopkins, the bandit, who is
accused of killing and wounding a
half dozen men in Skagit and Sno
homish counties, was found guilty of
murder in the first degree by a Jury
hero yesterday. The charges against
Ball, held as an accomplice, were dis
missed on motion of the prosecuting
attorney.
CHINA WILL PROTECT THE
STANDARD OIL PEOPLE
? ?
PEKING, June 16.?President Yuan
has telegraphed instructions to pro
vincial authorities in Shcn-s to give
every assistance and protection pos
sible to Standard Oil experts investi
gating tho oil fields. A military es
cort will protect the American oil dril
lers.
MISTAKEN PASSERBYS JEST
OVER DEAD WAGON DRIVER
SEATTLE, Juno 16.?With passer
bys jesting in the belief that he was
asleep on his wagon, Edward Lahore,
driver of a dairy wagon, who had
been sitting upright in his scat with
a milk ticket In his mouth for two
hours in front of a residence, was dis
covered to be dead yesterday after
noon.
FORMER FEDERAL OFFICIAL
IN WASHINGTON ASYLUM
?+?
SEATTLE, June 16.?Oliver Flak, 76
years of age, former United States
marshal for New York City, was com
mitted to the Steiiacoom insane asyl
um yesterday.
AVIATOR SHAVES HIMSELF
WHILE SAILING IN AIR
. VIENNA. June 16.?Aviator Knosh
el shaved himself this morning while
flying around the race course in an
aeroplane steered by Aviator Fern
from a position on his knees.
+ + 4>'i' + + + + + + + + * + + +
+ +
? EARTHQUAKE AT VALDEZ *
? * *
+ VALDEZ, June 16.?A sovere +
& earthquake shock was felt here ?
? last night. +
* ?:* + + -J- + + + + + + +

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