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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 01, 1914, Image 1

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Hi ! I m H 1 "I HBv II' jf ' ALASKA HISTORICAL 800, ' | . |
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___ THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
V?L- IV-> NO- 50(3. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 1, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Search For Alaska's
Uncharted Rocks Begins
V ,
SEATTLE. July 1.?A compleH wire
dras expedition. composed of 20 m*?
and equipment, headed by J. A. Daa^
iels. of the United States coast and
geodetic survey, sailed this morning
on the tug Chehalis for Alaska. The
expedition will drag the channels and
harbors of Alaska for pinnacle rocks
and other menaces to navigation.
The Chehalis will be Joined at Ket
chikan by the launch Arnold, which
will assist in the work.
MOTOR BOAT CLUB
TO PARTICIPATE
A temporary organization was ef
fected for the Gastineau Motor Boat
Club, and it was decided to have motor
boat races in Juneau on July Fourth,
at a meeting held in Grover C. Winn's
office last night
Messrs. Cleveland, Pulver and Ka
ser were appointed a committee to
confer with the- executive committee
of the Fourth of July celebration. It
was decided to hold the races Sunday
morning for which the celebration
committee has appropriated $100.
There will be five classes of races,
as follows:
Dory race?Two men with two or
-H?a. prize $10.
1 motorboat race?Prize $75.
oats, 30 feetaud under, prize
* class, 40 feet and under.
it and work boats. 65 feet and
. prize $25.
^^K^trance fee of $2 will be charg
ed for all' entries except the dory which
is free.
Speed boats will be barred from all
other than the speed boat race.
The starting point will be from the
Pacific Coast dock but the course has
not yet beet decided upon.
The Organization.
A committe on permanent organi
zation. to secure mooring quarters, and
submit constitution and by-laws was
appointed and consists of Grover C.
Winn. Ed Evans and S. L. Burton. A ,
white field with a blue star was adopt
ed for a pennant.
BOWLING FANS GETTING
THE TOURNEY BUG 1
? ?
Rowling fans, who make the Rruns- '
wick headquarters for entertainment ^
and who have taken a great fancy to
Mr. I .cam tug's alleys, are now discus- '
sing the formation of teams and the j
beginning of bowling tourneys. It is j
stated that the employees of Tom Ra
donich's Alaska Grill will organize at
v?ast one team, that the Alaskan Hotel
will furnish another, and that the Elec
tric Light & Power company boys will
make a third. Others are also discus
sing the plan of organizing.
GOLDSTEIN'S STORE TO
RE OPEN EVENINGS
The Charles Goldstein store will re
main open evenings every day this i
week until and including Friday night
?the evening before the Fourth of
July?for the benefit of Its patrons. '
j<. A 4. + 4. .> 4. 4. + I
* ? ']
* marine notes +
? +,
? ?
The Spokane, arriving from Sitka
will sail South tomorrow night at 10
o'clock. !
The Princess Alice returning from 1
Skagway will sail South from Juneau i
at 7 o'clock Friday morning.
The Dolphin was expected at the Isl- 1
and this afternoon at 3 o'clock. (
The Georgia left at 12:01 this morn- *
ing for Sitka.
The Mariposa jailed from Seattle 1
last night. '
The Northwestern s* I for the West- '
ward last night. !
The Alameda arrived from the West- 1
ward. Southbound, at midnight last ?
night. 1
The J. B. Stetson arrived from Skag
way Southbound this morning.
GEORGIA ARRIVALS.
?+?
The Georgia arriving from Sitka
and wayports brought the following ,
passengers for Juneau: From Chat- ,
am?John Hinstad. Bert Haaheln. J. ,
S. Harrta; from Hoonah?Dr. P. J.
Mahone: bum Gypsum?Charles Zu
rich: from Hawk Inlet?Dave Allen; j
from Excursion Inlet?W. J. Taggart. ,
John Davis. Charles V. Henry: from ]
Sitka?F. P. Turner: from Funter? .
Ed Nooney. ]
LEAVING ON ALAMEDA.
?
The Alameda arrived from the West- j
ward about midnight last ir?;ht en
route to the South. The fohowing '
took passage from Juneau: Otto A^en, !
C. G. Craig and wife. W. C. Leak. "V.
A. Irwin, James Mensor, G. 0. Bradley,'
Albert Lacost. Miss Brown. Miss Hy
der.
ARCTIC BROTHERS MEET.
Juneau Camp, No. 31. held an inter
esting meeting at Odd Fellows" hall
last night. The next meeting will be
at the same place July 14th.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?54.
Minimum?48.
Precipitation?.19.
Cloudy; rain.
DOROTHY HALEY
1 WINS CONTEST
Mllss Dorothy Huley won the God
?s of Liberty contest which termin
alrl at noon today, leading Mifcs Grace
^?bter, who ran second, by 436 votes.
njwMIss Lydia Krohonen, third, by
j/The vote of the three highest candi
dates was:
Dorothy Haley 1132
Grace Webster 696
Lydia Krohonen 622
Miss Haley Is Native Daughter.
Hiss Dorothy Haley is one of the
beautiful young misses of this city; a
native of Juneau, where she has spent
her entire lifetime; 14 years of age;
she has just finished the eighth grade
of the Juneau public school, and is one
of its most popular students. Sho will
make a charming Impersonator of the
Goddess of Liberty.
Committee Urges Decorating.
The decorating committee of the 4th
of-July committee is urging the busi
ness people and householders of Ju
neau to decorate their places of busi
ness and residences and their win
dows. To encourage appropriate dec
oration, they have offered a prize of
620 for the best decorated exterior;
610 for the second best and $15 for
the best window.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
TO CELEBRATE
At last night's meeting of the Ju
neau Are department Chief Milton
Winn's braves decided to enter three
contesting hose teams for the lndo
puudance Day sports, and also to take
part in the parade. Chief Winn ap
pointed George Dull, John McNeil, and
Sim Kreiman, captains of the respec
tive teams and authorized them to se
cure teams from the department at
large which has been done and the
teams will be seen iu action tonight
on Front street for their first practice
runs and wet tests. Chief Winn also
appointed John Clarke, John Harris
and Al. Zenger a committee to prepare
% float representing the department for
the big parade. The hook and ladder
truck will be used for this. It was al
to decided at tbt) meeting that the de
partment would turn out Its full
strength for the parade, all of the men
marching in line.
The Hose Teams.
The hose teams selected are as fol
lows:
No. 1.?Sim Freiman (captain), Mar
tin Lynch, Milt Berry. Max Humfrie,
Len Hurlbutt, Lou Derry. Royal Shep
ard. Frank Harvey, Alvin Goldstein,
Grover C. Winn, Cash Cole, Harry
Brun.
No. 2.?George Dull (captain), C. W.J
Carter, John Museth. J. W. Bell. John;
Harris. Dolly Gray, William Albert
son, Chas. Naghel, Marion Goldstein,
R. J. Harris, Tome Cole. H. I. Lucas.
No. 3.?John McNeil (captain), J. J.
Clarke. John Winn, Z. Bradford. Tom
Krigbaum, A. Zenger. H. McKanna,
George Simpklns, Bert Huehn. R. Mc
Kanna, Wallis George, Victor Epsteyn.
rHE PRINCESS ALICE
ARRIVES FIRST TIME
- - * ? ?: . ?' 'B
The Princess Alice arrived from the
South last night making the first of
four voyages that are to be made dur
ing the present summer season. Capt.
J. A. McLeod is in command and very
proud of his splendid ship. The Prin
cess Alice is one of the largest vessels
of the C. P. R. fleet operating on the
North Pacific coaat and is certainly
one of the most commodious and lux
uriously finished. She has been op
?rating on the triangle run of Puget
Sound and adjacent waters for nearly
two years and is a great favorite.
She can carry 1200 passengers and
las 222 state rooms.
Capt. J. A. McLeod, who is in com
mand of the Princess Alice, is the ad
miral of the Cauadian Pacific fleet,
md the regular master of the Princess
May which he commanded for years.
A large crowd was on the dock to
?reet the vessel and hundreds of peo
ple took occasion to Inspect the beau
tiful craft under the guidance of J. T.
SpicKett. agent of the company for
Juneau.
There were many round trip tour
ists aboard, some of whom will make
the trip over the White Pass and Yu
kon. ^to Whitehorse. Tho following
wetW for Juneau: L. McMullen, C.
Wharton, C. J. Opperman, Mrs. Irene
Lindsay, W. Price. W. Raymond and
wife. Mrs. Rascovich. William Rugg.
J. Fishman, Mrs. Had, Mrs. Peoples
und two children. Mrs. I. Brustkern
and two children. J. Martin, G. John
son, Mrs. Wharton and two children,
and two second Class.
GRAND THEATRE TONIGHT
E*tiro change of program tonight, as
follows:
"Re9?xnation," is a very touching
society trama.
"The Rights of a Savage," a great
"101 Bison" Indian feature.
fThv Loggtng Industry," education
al production: logging camps in the
Northwest
"A Friend to Children," a good com
edy production.
For Friday and Saturday?"Carmen"
Marion Leonard In a Vreel feature.
WATERFRONT RIGHT
OF WAY EXPECTED
.-It Is believed that with the propci
showing the Interior Department will
consent to the building of n water
front thoroughfare In front of Auk In
dlan village for the purposo of con
nectlng WHIoughby avenue or Indian
street extension, with E street In the
Casey-Shattuck addition, thus closing
the only gap exlutlng between Juneau's
business section and the Gold creeh
estuary and the government road lead
Ing to the north. The city council
has secured the cooperation of Gov,
J. F. A. Strong In bringing the necessi
ty of this Improvement to the atten
tion of Secretary Lane and data is
now being forwarded to back up the
application for the right of way de
sired. The Indian street extension Is
now completed as far as Sixth street,
or to the beginning of Auk village.
Under instructions from tho city
council, Wet trick & Wllhelm, tho well
known engineers, have Just completed
a specially drawn plat showing a por
tion of tho Juneau business section
and waterfront, the Auk village, and
the Casey-Shattuck addition. The
completed portion of Wllloughby ave
nue Is also shown and with It the pro
posed thoroughfare In front of Auk
village. A comprehensive idea of the
proposed improvement can therefore
bo grasped in a moment. This plat is
to be sent to the Department of the
Interior along w<tb other data relat
I ing to the application for permission
i to build in front of the native village.
I FORREST BUILDING
PRACTICALLY DONE
The new Forrest building on lower
Front street Is now practically com
pleted and a goodly portion of it al
ready in use. It occupies a space
facing 125 feet on Front street by
100 feet deep extending toward the
Pacific Coast company's dock site.
The building contains three store
rooms facing on Front street, one
store room facing on a passage way
to the south of tho building and two
large shops at the rear and reaching
tho full length of the building. It .Is
oue of the most substantial frame
| buildings erected in Juneau.
Two of the store rooms facing on
Front street are for rent. The store
room facing on the passage way has
been rented to Dave Talbot for a
plumbing shop. The third storeroom
facing on Front street will bo used for
the stock and store of the supply do
pot of the Juneau Iron Works. Mr.
Forrest stated this morning that it
was his intention to carry a complete
line of Standard and Regal gas en
gines and all the parts together with
a complete and varied stock of water
wheels and equipment. The offices of
the concern are in the rear portion of
the store room. Tho waterfront side
of the building Is already occupied'
by the machine and blacksmith shops
of the Juneau Iron Works.
Garage Started.
Immediately south of tho Forrest!
building and separated from It by anj
eight-foot passageway tho now gar
rage for the W. F. Merchant Motors!
company is being built. Active work:
on the construction was begun yester
day and tho frame for the walls was
raised yesterday. This building;
stands prtcinpally on the site former
ly occupied by the Juneau Iron Works.
This building is to be rushed to com
pletion with the same spirit that mark
ed the erection of the Forrest build
ing. It also stands on ground owned
by Forrest and is being erected by day
labor under the personal supervision
of Mr. Forrest.
DORTERO CASE SHOULD
REACH JURY TODAY
The case of Sabina Dortero against
the. Home Power Co of Skagway which
has occupied the attention of the dis
trict court ever since the opening of
the Skagway term was expected to
reach the Jury today. The action was
brought to recover for personal injur
ies alleged to have been sustained
through electric shock occasioned by
defective lnsullatlon.
There are two other Jury cases to
come before the court and many are
beginning to specvlate as to whether
or not the court will adjourn in season
for the officials to get homo for the
Fourth of July celebration.
GEORGE WELSH ALARMS
THE EARLY LARKS
???
Simon Hlrsch today received a let
ter from George Welsh who is start
ling the larks on the French ranch near
Stockton, California, by his early ris
ing. George says th'at he gets up at
4 a. m. each day and gets up steam
in the engine after which all he has
to do is attach the milkers to the
patient kine and ivatch the pails fill.
Taken altogether he is fond of his
ranching experience and is feeling
fine.
NOTICE TO PUBLIC.
Owners of livestock arc hereby noti
fied that horses and cattle caught run
ning at large on the streets of Juneau
will be taken up and placed in the
city pound. Owners will save expens
es by keeping their stock off the
streets.
Dated at Juneau, June 29. 1914.
W. H. McBRIDE,
(???6-29-tf) Chief of Police.
FREE TRIP?
To San Francisco Panama Exposl
| tion if you buy your drugs from the
Juneau Drug Co.. 107 Front St., phone
250. 6-22-tf
For a good Spanish lunch, see Ta
male Joe. 7-l-6t.
PRESIDENT SELLS
' TWO BATTLESHIPS
? WASHINGTON, July 1.?Secretury
I of the Navy Josephus Daniels announc
? ed this morning that the battelshlps
? Mississippi and Idaho had been sold
- to private parties for the amount of
i the cost of their actual construction
i and .mprovcments, the exact figure
; to be determined. It is understood
i that the private purchasers will trans
:j fer them to Greece almost immedlate
? iy
I The original cost of tho Mississippi
. was $6,629,183; and of the Idaho, |5,
- 558,731. The displacement of each 1b
? 13,000 tons.
i
Bills Signed Last Night
WASHINGTON. July 1.?President
i Woodrow Wilson lasc night signed the
naval appropriation bill, authorizing
tho construction of two superdroad
naughts, and the bill authorizing the
sale of tho Mississippi and Idaho and
the construction of a third superdread
naught with tho proceeds of the sale.
CHEROKEE NATION
IS DISSOLVED
WASHINGTON, July 1.?Tho Che
rokee Nation, one of the five civilized
Nations of old Indian Territory, was
dissolved at midnight last night, and
the members of it became simple
citizens of the United States. Tho
former officers of tho Nation and the
tribal organization gave way to tho
regular civil authorities of the muni
cipalities and couiitios in which they
reside and of the State and National
governments.
SEATTLE DEFEATS
PROPOSED CHARTER
??
SEATTLE, July 1.?Returns aro
,not yet all in from yesterday's voting
on the charter submitted by the 16
freeholders who were elected at the
last municipal election, but they are
sufficient to determine that it was
badly defeated. The majority may
reach two to one. The proposal au
thorizing the granting of franchises
without the 'Vmmon user" clause
likewise is defeated. It is thought
that several if not all the bonding
propositions may have carried.
The new charter was defeated by
the progressive votors, who favor a
common commission government. The
freeholders turned down the commis
sion form of government for the
managerial systom with a large legis
lative council elected from districts
Instcnd of from .'.be cltv at large. The
voters have defoated their plan.
Light Vote Cast
SEATTLE, July 1?Out of nearly
75,000 votes registered only 20,000
were cast at the charter election yes
terday.
THINGS LOOK BETTER
FOR FRENCH FINANCES
? ?
PARIS, July 1.?The new cabinet
is very generally welcomed. Bank
ers now agree that the political crin
sis, temporarily at least, has ended.
New Loan Coming.
The new French loan will issue prob
ably on July 6. in 3 Vfe per cents around
92, intended to produco $161,000,000
not. It Is expected the loan will be
oversubscribed thirty times.
WILLIAM IS ONLY
ONE AT FUNERAL
VIENNA, July 1.?Emperor William,
of Germany, is the only foreign mon
arch who is here to ationd the funeral
of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The
failure of other monarchs to come to
Vienna is due to the fact that Emperor
Francis Joseph is physically unequal
to the tasK of entertaining them.
FORMER MAYOR COPLY
IS JUNEAU VISITOR
John S. Coply, former Mayor of
Nome, is a Juneau visitor, staying at
the Alaskan hotel. This is Mr. Cop
ly's first visit to tho Pacific coast of
Alaska, though ho was in business for
years at Nome. Ho will leave on the
Mariposa for the Westward. While in
Juneau he has spent considerable time
visiting old Nomeltes.
NOTICE TO ODD FELLOWS.
Silver Bow Lodge No. 2 I. 0. 0. P.
will hold Installation of officers Thurs
day ovenlng, July 2nd. All members
are reuqested to attend, and visiting
brothers cordially invited.
(6-30-2t) CHAS. NELSON,
Acting Noble Grand.
GRUBSTAKE COMING
FROM ANCIENT CAPITAL
-
The Grubstake, Capt. E. D. Beattle,
left Sitka this morning and will ar
rive in Juneau tomorrow morning.
The Grubstake has been out with a
cruising party for the past several
days.
t i t
ELKS MEET TONIGHT.
There will be a regular meeting of
Juneau Lodge No. 420, B. P. O. E., at
8 p. m. tonight, (Wednesday). Vis
iting members requosted to attend.
G. F. FORREST,, Exalted Ruler.
H. I. LUCAS, Secretary.
W. H. Raymond, a Portland insur
ance man, arrived in Juneau last night
on the Princess Alice. He is accom
panied by ' Mrs. Raymond and they
are staying at the Hotel Cain,
ROOSEVELT ROASTS
TWO OLD PARTIES
? PITTSBURGH, Pa.. July 1.?Former
President Theodore Roosevelt de
nounced the Democratic administra
tion in unmeasured terms in a speech
here last night opening the Progress
ive party campaign in this State. He
declared that the new tariff law is a
"collossal failure," the anti-trust pro
gram an "economic absurdity," and
the foreign policy "wretched."
Continuing, Roosevelt charged the
Republican bosses with responsibility
for putting Woodrow Wilson In the
Presidential chair by thwarting the
rank and (lie of the Republican party
in the last National convention.
The passing of government back
and forth between the Republican and
Democratic parties was characterized
by the Colonel as "government by con
vulsion." Senator Boies Penrose, of
this State, wns denounce^ and Qifford
Pinchot praised.
At the close of his speech, Col.
Roosevelt was "all in" physicially, and
he had not fully recovered from the
effects of his effort when he left for
New York about midnight.
Penrose Hits Back.
PITTSBURGH, Pa., July 1.?Sen
ator Bois Penrose this morning gave
out a letter for publication which he
received from then President Theo
dore Roosevelt just after the election
of 1904, In which the President thank
ed him for the support he had given
him in the campaign and congratulat
ed him upon the election returns from
Pennsylvania which had given Roose
velt 505,519 plurality,
C. P. R. ATTORNEY BLAMES
STORSTADTS 3rd MATE
QUEBEC. Juno 30.?The arguments
In the official inquiry into the Empress
of Ireland disaster, begun Saturday,
were continued yesterday and today.
The first attempt to fix direct respon- ?
sibility was when Butler Aspinwall,
attorney for the Canadian Pacific, snld
that Third Officer Saxo was unauthor
ized to take the wheel of the Stor
stadt from the helmsman and put is
hnrd a-port when it had already been
put a-port with the vessel having
steerage way and pointed to avoid a
collision. He said to find that the Em
press bad starboarded her helm would
be to find Capt. Kendall of the ship
guilty of perjury. He said Saxo was ]
clearly responible for the accident.
FORMER SENATOR TURNER
FIGHT IN SEATTLE ,
SEATTLE, July 1.?Former Senator j
George Turner opened hla campaign i
for the Democratic nomination for t
United States Senator in., this city '
last night at the Seattle Press Club ?
auditorium. He declared that he i
stands fairly and squarely behind'the i
policies of President Woodrow Wilson, i
SAM WALL ABANDONS '
CENTRAL AMERICAN TRIP '
?+?
SEATTLE, June 24.?That the Seat
tle yacht Iola, with Capt. J. H. Sy
berg, of this city, and George Wood of
San Francisco, on board, has been
wrecked off the coast of Lower Cali
fornia or sunk in a heavy storm which
raged of the coast May 29, is the fear
of S. W. Wall, a former Seattle, Ta
coma and Alaska newspaper man who
returned today from San Francisco
after waiting 20 days for the yacht
to appear.
Wall, in company with two moving
picture men and an experienced crew,
had planned to spend a year in Lower
California waters taking pictures of
the natives and the country. The orig
inal expedition for this purpose was
disrupted two months ago, when hos
tilities broke out on the West Coast
between Mexicans and Americans.
Wall and the camera men waited for
the Iola to arrive, first in San Diego,
then in San Pedro and finally in San
Francisco.
MARIPOSA SAILS WITH
MANY FOR JUNEAU
^??
SEATTLE. July 1.?The Mariposa
sailed at 1 o'clock this morning with *
tho following named pasongers for Ju- 1
neau: Mrs. F. F. Graff, M. A. Miller
and wife, Sumnor S. Smith, R. H. Dod- 1
son, Mary Cevey, Blon Tracy, Miss
Lena Trulson, Miss F. G. Jordan, Iora I
Krasel, Mrs. M. J. Aubrey, Mrs. R. T.
Lynch, Mrs. Amelia Anderson, Mrs. W.
Pearson, Mrs. S. FonloneBle, Robert
Sparger and wife, Ed. M. Kane, J. B.
Milzarek, Mrs. T. L. Stone. V. L.
Payne, W. H. Seeley, A1 Page, James
C. Snemmond, R. A. Gleason, A. Bro
dertck, E. B. Jackson, J. H. Guffoy, J.
R. C. Connor, Will Nesbit and six steer
age.
CATHOLIC CHURCHMEN
GATHERING IN JUNEAU
Father William Shcpard arrived on
tho Alameda from Valdez to attond
the meeting hero with Rev. Father
Richard Gleeson, provincial for the
province of California, which includes
Ave Western States and Alaska. Fa
ther Vanderpol, also of Valdez, and
Father Mahoney of Ketchikan are at
present visiting with Father Bruck
ert of Douglas. Father Turaell of
Skagway will come to Juneau on the
next trip of the Georgia completing
the party that will be in Juneau when
Gather1 Gleeson arrives. They will all
be entertained by Father A. R. Drath
man of Juneau.
INCREASING CAPITAL.
The Hoonah Packing company has
filed amended articles with Charles E.
Davidson, Secretary of Alaoka, show
ing an increase of the capital stock
from $75,000 to $100,000.
HUERTA DELEGATES
LOOK EOR PEACE
???
NIAGARA FALLS, Canada, July 1?
Tho Hucrta delegates to the peace
conference regard the latest note re
ceived from Gen. Carranza last night
as vory satisfactory. They regard it
as indicating a desire on the part of
the Constitutionalists to enter tho
conference, and to participate In ar
ranging tho final settlement of Mexi
can matters.
FRENCH PRINCE SAYS
SUFFRAGE TO BLAME
NEW YORK, July 1.?Prince Andre
PonlatowskI, the Paris banker and
friend and financial associate in many
deals of E. H. JIarriman, who Is here.
Bays:
"Europe docs not think over highly
of the way the United States has been
run of late. The trouble here Is the
same as it Is In all countries where
they have universal suffrage. We have
hundreds of people like President Wil
son In Europe?brainy, scholarly, cul
tured, charming, but theorists and im
practicable believers in the capacity
of the mass of non-property holders
to govern themselves. The franchise
should be restricted in the United j
States. Then the Wilsons would give
place to men closer in touch with bus
iness."
rEDDY THINKS COUNTRY
WANTS HIM TO CURE IT
NEW YORK, July 1?The Now York
American contains an interview with
former President Theodore Roosevelt
In which the latter is quoted as say
ing that he will accept the Progres
sive party nomination for President.
Roosevelt said that ho would accept
the nomination "because I am con
vinced that the country is in the most
unhealthy state and that the majority
jf the men of the Nation want me to
:ure it"
HEINZE NOT IN DANGER
OF IMMEDIATE DEATH
NEW.YORK, July 1?The commit
tee of physicians which visited F. Aug.
ieinze, upon appointment by the Su
premo Court reported, nfter an exam
nation, that the report that he is at
the point of death was not justified,
rhcy say that?hw Is" Suffering from
itomach and heart troubles, and is
very ill, but that death is not immi
lcnt and that the prospect of recovery
s good.
IAPAN WILL NOT
PRINT CORRESPONDENCE
?+?
TOKYO, July 1.?'The foreign min
ster announced yesterday that the
treaty negotiations that have been
conducted between that country and
the United States over the subject of
California's alien law legislation will
lot be announced in this country out
if deference to a request from the
United States.
3T. LOUIS UNIVERSITY TO
BUILD HOSPITAL NOW
?+?
ST. LOUIS. July 1.?SL Louis Uni
versity will not wait until death of
lames Campbell's Immediate heirs to
Jegln building the medical college and
liospltal, to which his fortune of $30,
)00,000 or more, now held in trust, is
ultimately to go. Arrangements for
borrowing money to Ve repaid from
the principal of the bequest are being
jonsidered by those in charge of the
university's medical department.
TEXAS GETS $30,000,000
GULF COAST STEEL PLANT
GALVESTON, Tex., July 1. ? The
construction of the steel plant at Tex
?s City by the Southwestern Steel De
velopment Co., capital $30,000,000, is
now assured, as financial arrange
ments have been made In Europe,
principally In Belgium.
MT. LASSEN EXPERIENCES
ITS FOURTEENTH ERUPTION
RED BLUFF. Calif.. July 1. ? Mt.
Lassen experienced its fourteenth
eruption this morning. Smoke Is as
cending one mile in helghth above the
mountain, and ashes are falling for
a distance of 13 miles from It. Lake
Manzanlla, near tho mountain, has
fallen three feet since yesterday.
SEATTLE PIONEER IS
CRUSHED TO DEATH
SEATTLE, July 1.?John Graham,
a pioneer of this city and long an em
ployee of the Carman Manufacturing
company, was crushed to death last
night in an elevator of the company's
plant.
GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY
TO MEET AT SEATTLE
?*?
CHICAGO, July 1.?The seventh an
nual convention of the Sign Gamma
Phi' fraternity closed today. It select
ed Seattle as the meeting place for
1916 convention.
Dr. Earl Bemis, returned from
Skagway on the J. B. Stetson this
morning and Is staying at the Cain.
Huerta Preparing To
Depart Trom Mexico
WASHINGTON, July 1. ? Privata
advices received today through un
official sources but credited, neverthe
less, from Mexico City state that Gen.
Huerta had sent his son and daughter
to Puerto Mexico and that he is mak
ing preparations for his own depar
ture. The Information was conveyed
to the Htato Department where It is
said that it caused no apparent sur
prise
It is said'that Huerta has $8,000,000
standing to his personal crredit in
Paris banks to provide against the
danger of spending his last days in
exile.
SENATE MAY INVESTIGATE
COLOMBIAN PANAMA MATTER
WASHINGTON, July 1.?The Sen
ate will investigate the acquisition of
the Panama canal zone and the Pan
ama rebellion and the part that the
United States took in the rebellion
before it acts upon the Colombian
treaty, according to the statement of
a member of the Senate foreign rela
tions commlttco. It is said that the
suggestion that this action be taken
was made by Secretary of State Will
iam J. Bryan. If the Senate takes
this action testimony and statements
will be made by those familiar with
the circumstances, and an opportunity
will be given former President Theo
dore Roosevelt to testify.
M'ADOO ASKS CONGRESS
FOR MORE AUTHORITY
?+?
WASHINGTON, July 1.?Secretary
of the Treasury William Q. McAdoo
hno sent a communication to Congreus
recommending an amendment to the
Income tax law, aimed chiefly at check
ing up in matters of stock dividends.
Under the present law the Individu
al In paying Income tax is permitted
to deduct such dividends because of
the tax of one per cent. Imposed on
corporations. The Internal revenue
men now purpose to open stock lists of
all corporations subject to the tax and
also to give the collectors other pow
ers which will enable them to trace a
tax-payer's securities even into a safe
deposit vault.
CONGRESS MAY REMAIN
IN SESSION FOR MONTH
???
WASHINGTON. July 1.?It Is now
thought that Congress may remain In
session for n month. The report of
the Clayton nnti-trust bill, amending
the Sherman act will be reported by
the Senate committee this week, prob
ably, and it is thought that it might
be August 1 before It and the other
anti-trust bills will bo passed by the
Senate.
PRESIDENT QUOTES Hn,L
AS OPTIMISTIC PROPHET
t '
WASHINGTON, July 1.?In support
of his conclusion that the country is
on the eve of a period of prosperity
and that evidence abundantly Justi
fies It, President Woodrow Wilson
quoted assurances of the fact that Jas.
J. Hill, whom, he said, he regards as
one of the greatest authorities on bus
iness conditions In the world.
HAITIEN REVOLUTIONIST
AND FOLLOWERS KILLED
WASHINGTON, July 1.?Capt. Eb
erle, of the United States armored
cruiser Washington, today reported to
the Secretary of the Navy that Sena
tor Davilmar Theodore, ,he Haltien
revolutionst, and 60 of his followers
were killed In a battle on the Domin
ican frontier today,
SECRETARY DANIELS' DHY
ORDER GOES IN'.O EFFECT
WASHINGTON, July 1.?Secretary
of the Navy Josephus Daniels' order
banishing liquor from the United
States navy becomes effective today.
SENATOR ROOT WILL NOT
RUN FOR SENATE AGAIN
ALBANY, N. Y., July 1?Senator
Elihu Root, writing to William Barnes,
jr., the Republican leader of New York,
snys he will positively not be a candi
date for re-election to the United
States Senate.
OLOEST ENGLISH EARL
DIES AT LONDON TODAY
LONDON, July 1. ? Earl Wcymss
and March, aged 96 years, the
eldest member of the House of Lords,
died hero today. He will be succeed
ed by Lord Elcho.
'FRISCO MAN IS NAMED
AMBASSADOR TO RU8SIA
?+?
WASHINGTON, July 1.?President
Woodrow Wilson today nominated
George T. Mayre, of San Francisco,
to bo ambassador to Russia.
WEST VIRGINIA BECOMES
PROHIBITION STATE TODAY
CHARLESTON. W. Va.. July 1. ?
West Virginia's 3tato wide prohibition
law went Into effect today. ..
An "Elk knife" for an "Elk" A
knife for everybody. Juneau Drug
Co., The store that has what you
i want when you want it. Opposite Al
, nskan hotel. Phone 260. 7-1-tf.

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