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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 07, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 610. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Guggenheims May Put
? More Millions In Alaska
SEATTLE. July 7.?Stephen Birch,
who arrived in this city yesterday, an
nounced that the Guggcnhelms expect
shortly to begin the expenditure of an
other f 10.000.000 Investment In Alas
ka. The money will be expended in
mines in the Copper river district, said ?
Birch, provided the properties stand
up under investigation.
Birch is loading a big Held force In
to the White river district Among
other things that it is proposed by
the Guggenheim Interests to do in
Alaska, said Birch. Is to build an aerial
tram to the Jumbo mine; to increase
the concentrating capacity at the Bo
nanza mine, and to Increase the plants
at the Beatson and La Touche mines.
Birch refused to specify the new
properties that It is proposed to pur
chase.
SITKA PIONEER S HOME
IN GOOD CONDITION
Gov. J. P. A. Strong who recently
returned from a visit to the Pioneers
Home at Sitka reports that institution
in good condition. "It is well manag
ed." said the Governor, "and the in
mates are contented and all looking
well, except two who are rapidly Hear
ing the last great divide. 1 did not
hear a single complaint from any of
them. There are 31 Inmates all told,
hailing from different parts of the Ter
ritory and as far away as Nome and
the Arctic slope."
"The Hon. A. G. Shoup. member of
the House of Representatives Is sup
erintendent of the institution and he
is a devoted officer. His is a labor of
love for there is no compensation con
nected with the management of the
institution. I. am well pleased with
conditions at the Home as I found
them."
THREE SHIPS SAIL
FOR THE NORTH
SEATTLE. July 7.?The Alameda.
Admiral Sampson and the Al-KI sailed
from Seattle for Alaska last night with
good passenger lists. The Alameda
and the Admiral Sampson have good
lists of tourists, making the round
trip.
Alameda's List.
The following named are on the
Alameda for Juneau: J. 0. Dogan, W.
R. Martin. Mrs. J. F. Soles. Esther
Hartman. Geraldlne Soles, C. H. Wil
son. W. E. Hamilton, Mrs. Adriehne
Noble. John Wagner. Geo. it. Noble,
Mrs. I. Sowerby, James Acklan. Mrs.
J. W. Foley. Elisabeth and Anna Crop
ley. Stephen Juda, H. S. Young. Miss
M. Bean. Miss Laura Harris and two
steerage.
On the Admiral Evans.
The following named are passen
gers for Juneau on the Admiral Ev
ans:
William Kallerman. Herbert EL Wil
son. R. D. Pritchett. Miss Emma Mat
thews, Ada L. Matthews, Mrs. G. C.
Ming, Miss A. Smtih. Mrs. Henry
Acabom. V. H. Elfendall. Miss J. S.
Griswold. J. W. Wilson and wife, Mrs.
Helen White. Miss L. Burke, and
Mrs. F. Vaughn.
Coming on Al-KI.
On the Al-Ki for Juneau are the fol
lowing named: Samuel Neuswander.
Geo. Anderson, 0. W. Johnson. E. W.
Walsh. Mrs. C. J. Davis, E. L. Jud
kins and wife. Miss M. Johansen. Matt
Matson and wife, and seven steerage.
HUMBOLDT HAS
PLEASURE SEEKERS
?
The Humboldt arrived in Juneau at
two o'clock this morning having stop
ped at Taku glacier for the benefit of
a large number of tourists who are
making the trip. All told there are
35 round trip passengers aboard. The
ship will lay over at Skagway to give
tourists an opportunity to make the
trip on the White Pass and Yukon
and witness the sunset from the sum
mit of White Pass. She will sail South
from Juneau tomorrow morning at 11
o'clock.
The following passengers were for
Juneau: F. Schank. S. H. Angen. Mich
ael Martin and three second class;
for Douglas?Eld Teague. Thomas Tea
gue. U. T. Collins, and three second
class.
J. H. GUFFEY IN JUNEAU
TO GO IN BUSINESS
J. H. GufTey well known Alaskan of
Nome and owner of the Guffey build
ing in Juneau arrived on the Mariposa
and will remain In Juneau with the
idea of engaging in the drug business
here. He but recently came from
Nome. Nome, he declares, will even
tually develop into a good quartz min
ing camp although the placers will re
ceive most attention for many years
yet.
Mr. Guffey Is owner of the Guffey
building on lower Front street.
EDITH G. WINS FOR
BEST DECORATIONS
P. J. Cleveland's launch .Edith G.
carried off first honors and the prize
for the best decorations in the mar
ine parade on the night of July 4th.
Len Adsit's Lillian was given second
prize.
CAREFUL ATTENTION
Is given al prescriptions. If taken to
Doran's Prescription Pharmacy. Here
all prescriptions are invariably com
pounded with absolute accuracy. Only
pure drugs are used; no substitution
Is ever allowed. Physicians know this.
Repular patrons appreciate it Phone
3?Doran's Prescription Pharmacy.?
5-20-tf.
RECEIVER BOYLE LEAVES
TO MEET MRS. BOYLE
Receiver Frank A. Boyle, of the
local land jfflce. engaged passage on
the Admiral Sampson today for Seat
tle where he goes to meet Mrs. Boyle
who has been East for the past two
months visiting her parents at Mil
waukee ?
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?#0.
Minimum?44.
Part Cloudy.
CHARTER EOR K OF C
COUNCIL COMING
The uational director* of tho
Knights of Columbus according to ad
vices recently recevled in Juneau, are
about to Issue a charter to the body
of Catholic ruon in Juneau for the lo
cal council of the order which has al
ready reached au organisation and
made application for tho chnrter. The
' organizers here are very busy on the
matter and intend holding an open
meeting on or about July 15. for the
purpose of completing arrangements
for the installation of the local coun
cil. which will probably tako place
not later than August 16. Notice of
the exact date of this meeting will
appear later.
The proposed installation of a coun
cil of the Knights of Columbus in
Juneau will mark the advent of tho
first Catholic society in Alaska. The
Knights are composed of two branch
es: Insurance and associate members,
the former participating In a system
of fraternal insurance which is rated
as one of the best, if not the best,
throughout the United States. Tho
principles on which the Society is
founded are Faith. Charity, and Pat
riotism. and the results of the work
of the KnightH based on these virtues
have been very gratifying to its mem
bers at large. ?
TWO SUPERB VICTIMS
SEATTLE SCHOOL BOYS
??+?
Bob Saunders and Oscar Carlson,
two of the victims of the Superb
wreck In Lynn canal last Saturday, J
were Seattle school boys, and friends ,
of E. E. Blosom and Paul Thompson, J
of Juneau, who were school mates in ,
the Lincoln high school in the Puget ,
Sound metropolis. . ,
Saunders and Carlson came North ,
two or three weeks ago. and while ,
here thoy visited with Paul Thomp- ,
son and Earl Blosom. ,
It was their intention to go to Skag- ,
way and work during their vacations, ,
and return to Seattle to continue their .
education. Saunders had graduated ,
from the high school, and expected to ,
matriculate in the University of Wash
ington in September. Carlson had not
yet completed his high school course. >
Saunders resided at 46th street.
North, and 14th Avenue. Northeast.
Seattle with a widowed mother, whom
with two younger children he was
assisting to support in addition to at- ,
tending school. Carlson resided with (
his father. Peter Carlson, at 3939 j
Stone Avenue, Seattle. (
The body of neither of the boys has ,
been recovered ' -
Skagway Boys Victims. ,
Stanley Dillon and Henry Bienhofter,- ]
two of the Superb victims, were Skag- ,
way raised boys. The former is the .
son of George W. Dillon, for many ,
years connected with the municipal |
government at- Skagway, and general- |
ly active at that place. The Dillon |
family located in Skagway in 1897 and
has resided there since that time.
Stanley Dillon is survived by his fa
ther and several brothers and sisters.
Henry BienhofTer has lived at Skag
way most of his life time. He came 1
there as a boy and attended the pub
lic school. His aunt. Miss Marry Bien
hoffer, is manager of the Bergmann <
hotel at this place, and a sister resides
here with their aunt. Another sister 1
is in Germany, studying music, and '
a brother Is at Skagway. '
Disaster Shocks Haines.
HAINES, July 6.?The sad accident '
in Lynn canal Saturday morning In (
which 14 lives were lost by drowning ,
cast a gloom over this place, anri (
made the little Fourth of July celebra
tion a very depressing affair.
It is sad indeed to think of those
people being swept off of the stage of
action in the morning and prime of
life, and it Is also sad for their loved
ones in far distant lands who are wait
ing for their return, and who perhaps
may never know their fate.
I
DRAPER CLUB EXTENDS
THANKS FOR PRIZE
The ladies of the Draper club wish
to acknowledge the receipt of $25.00,
awarded to the club as the first prize
for the best float.in the Fourth of July
parade.
The entire community soems delight
ed with the decision of the Judges,
particularly so. because of the fact
that the money goes into the fund
raised by the efforts of this club, to
be used for a Free Reading Room
and Public Library.
The Draper Club extends sincere
thanks to all who In any way assisted
in the endeavor to win this prize.
ENTHUSIASTIC FANS
GIVE FORD PRESENT
?+??
This afternoon Walter Ford. 4 Ju
neau's premier baseball pitcher, was
presented with a purse of $100, the
contribution of enthusiastic fans who
have witnessed his excellent work
during the season thus far. Team
Manager R. W. Wulzen made the pre
sentation.
Ford holds a very enviable record,
thus far for the season he has an av
erage credit of 11 strikeouts per game,
while the hits ofT his delivery for the
same period have been kept down to
an average of 4 for each game.
NEW DRUGGISTS ARRIVES
FROM PHOENIX, ARIZ.
W. H. Seeley. a graduate pharma
cist. arrived In Juneau Saturday to ac
cept a position In Britt's Pharmacy.
Mr. Seeley comes to Alaska from
Phoenix. Arizona. He is delighted
with Juneau.
Get In Tune.
D. E. Leatherman. a tuner from the
Baldwin Piano Co.. is In town for a
few days; address Juneau Music Hse.,
phone 317. 7-6-6t.
FOUND ? A silver watch on thfc
Treadwell baseball grounds. Owner
can obtain same by calling at Ciub
I Cigar Stand and paying for this ad.
GOV. STRONG ON
EXHIBIT BOARD
^WASHINGTON. July 7.?An amend
ment to the sundry civil bill adopted
"by the Senate this afternoon placed
the Governor of Alaska on the Govern
ment board to expend the $500,000
government appropriation for the Pan
amn-Paclflc exposition.
The meaning of this amendment Is
that the Alaska exhibit will be cared
for from the Federal appropriation.
Alaska Gets Another $100,000.
WASHINGTON. July 7.?The Son
ato today allowed $100,000 in the Sun
dry Civil bill for the Alaska fisheries
vessels that were cut out by the com
mittee.
WICKERSHAM TO
REMAIN IN EAST
In a letter from Washington, Del
egate James Wlckersham says he will
not be in Alaska until after the Demo
cratic convention shall have adjourn
ed. He sayB that there is a good
chance to secure the passage by Con
gress of the Alaska coal land leasing
bill, the Alaska development board
bill and other legislation, and he feels
that it is his duty to remain at the
capital as long as there is a chance to
secure legislation rather than to re
turn to the North.
Delegate Wlckersham says that the
coal leasing bill id not satisfactory in
its present form, but ho believes that
amendments to It will be agroed upon
that will make it so before its pass
age.
It is now thought that the anti-trust
bills will keep Congress in session
throughout the month of July, and the
friends of Alaska will use that time in
rndeAvoring to secure the passage of I
more of the Alaska program.
+++++*++++++++++
fr ?>
* CYPRUS ESTABLISHES *
+ - A NEW SPEED RECORD *
fr ??? +
{? SEATTLE. July 7.?The Cy- +
{? prus. Col. D. C. Jackling'8 yacht, +
* arrived here laat evening hav- +
fr ing made the run from Sitka +
In 58 hours and 45 minutes, *
{? the fastest tlmo on rocord on +
{? the Alaska run. Col. Jackllng +
{? and his guests were on board. +
* +
SITKA VOTES SALOONS
OUT OF BUSINESS
The ancient capital of Alaska has
{one dry or that state Is Imminent ac
cording to advices received in Jun- j
jau. At the saloon census Just finish
ed the people or Sitka by a majority
>f 25 indicated their opposition, to the
;ranting of liquor licenses la the com
munity. Pending the arrival of Judge
R. W. Jennings In Juneau those en
gaged in the business are up in the ,
ilr. The saloons at Sitka are still ,
operating. however, and will continue
to do so until the court passes upon j
the result of the recent enumeration j
to ascertain the will of the people. <
? ? ? i
TONIGHT. i
?+? I
The following excellent program to
night at the Grand theatre:
."A Narrow Escape," Reliance.
"A Tale of Love," adventures and
laring, which grips young and old.
"His Sacrifice." You will enjoy the
excitement and the suspense in this |
thrilling picture of the West, Ameri
can make.
"Billy's Surrender." is a Powers
film with plenty action; a picture that ,
you are sure to enjoy.
"Its' Delightrul to bo Married," a
3aumont comedy that provides no
end of merriment. Come tonight and
enjoy our show.
A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE (
Juneau Drug Co. 1
107 Front St.
Phone 250
They carry the best stock in town.
They carry the best stock
Their stock is new and complete.
Their prescription department Is
modern.
Thefr service is perfecst.
Courtesy towards their patrons and
good will towards everybody is the
motto of the "store that has what
you want when you want It."
Remember that they are giving a
free trip to San Francisco.
KETCHIKAN LAWYER SEES
ACTIVITY AT JUNEAU
Judge Plumley returned from Skag
way last night on the Jefferson with
er he went to present the petition for
the extension of the town boundaries,
notice of which appears on another
page of today'? Miner. He reports that
Juneau is a very busy town with lots
of building but that poor old Skagway
Is as dead as ever.?Ketchikan Miner.
SEWARD TO HAVE A
BASEBALL PARK
The Seward Commercial Club has
voted to guarantee the payment of
$400 for the Improvement of Seward's
baseball park.
Local business men have already
subscribed $285 of the $400 guaranteed
for the ball park and the rest is as
sured, as no general canvass has been
made.?Seward Gateway.
COURT OFFICIALS
ARE COMING HOME
Advices received late yesterday af
ternoon from Skagway state that the
Skagway term of court will adjourn
and the court officials will return to
Juneau on the City of Seattle tomor
row.
PRINCE RUPERT FORMS
PIONEERS' ASSOCIATION
The pioneers of Prince Rupert who
arrived at the town prior to May 1,
1909, have formed a Pioneers' Asso
ciation.
FOR RENT ? Three room unfur
nished with bath, $22; Pettlt & Har
vey. 7-6-tf.
FOR RENT ? house; Inquire Mrs.
Montgomery Davis, 202 E. 6th SL tf
BIG DEVELOPMENT
NEARLY FINISHED
Tho first construction period of the
Alaska-Gastlneau Mining company la '
rapidly growing to a close, and with !
It there la beginning a recession In '
pay rolls so far as the Immediate fu- J
ture Is concerned. 1
Tho central 300 feet of the great Im- 1
pounding dam at Salmon creek has
reached Its ultlroato height and tho 1
eight crow has been laid off. If noth- <
ing serious intervenes, on or before <
August 1, the construction equipment <
will have been removed and tho water 1
turned In.
At Perseverance tho mine develop
ment program of blocking out In the
way of sinking, drifting, and raising ,
will be largely flnlshod within the next ]
60 days. Supt. H. 0. Jackson has '
been doing about 3,500 feet hard rock <
development work each month. Af- ,
tor this development is finished tho ]
force will commence stoplng for tho
purpose of providing ore tonnage for
the big reduction works. Tho con
struction work at Pcrseveranco Is all
finished.
At Sheep creek the main camp Is '
completed as far as will be carried [
out this year. The construction on ;
the ore reduction works is progressing
rapidly. Tho concrete foundations are '
complete for tho coarse crushing
plant, the fine crushing plant, and for 1
the concentrating mill. A large num- c
ber of men engaged in this work have
been laid off. Tho buildings are be- .
ing erected by contract and the steel I
workers have already finished erect
ing the coarse crushing plant and are
now assembling tho steel for the flno
crushing plant and concentrating mill.
As soon as this work Is complete the
crews will leave for the States.
Speaking of the Alaska-Gastlneau c
company's operations here General 1
Manager B. L. Thane today said: "We v
are rapidly finishing what Is known '
as the first constructive stage, accord- r
Ing to the program laid out. As this t
period proceeds we will have to lay f
off men and diminish the crews until '
the operative stage begins.
"At the start we will begin oporat- '
Ing with one section only, then In or- 1
der tho second, third, and fourth sec- v
tlons will bo brought to life, but It
will require at least six months beforo r
the mill will be in complete opera
tion after It starts.
"After the mill Is running properly
the company will undoubtedly contin
ue Its construction program." c
Referring to the effect of mine de- t
vclopment and mine operations on the p
welfare of Juneau; Mr. Thane said:
"We have a good community here
and we want to keep It right It has
the right kind of mines behind it, and s
the right kind of natural resources, t
We should act sanely, and be careful b
not to overdo things and create an un- ti
healthy condition." t!
? ? ? h
BIG MINING MEN
COMING NORTH 3
? ^ ? ?*?? - s
SEATTLE. July 8.?Col. R. W. Stov- n
cnson, nn eminent mining engineer d
with offlcee in New York, Boston nnd v
Philadelphia, with four assistants left u
last night for Fairbanks, via Portage
Bay, Alaska, to investigate a number /
of largo properties and to establish
central headquarters at Fairbanks for
representatives of large Eastern fi
nanciers.
* * * o
NEW MANAGER FOR P
SEATTLE DAILY SUN j
?+? r
SEATTLE, July 7.?Samuel P. Wes- C
ton. formerly business manager of the t
Seattle Postilntelllgcncer and more
recently manager of the Westerner r
magazine, hns taken the management v
of the Seattle Sun. t
, , t r
ITEMS OF INTEREST
FROM HAINES MISSION p
HAINES, July 6.?H. D. Gardner Is t
down from his mining claim on Fourth s
of July creek, a tributary of Glacier, e
In the Porcupine country. Mr. Gard
ner Is on hlB way to Washington (
near Tacoma where he resides. He
reports a successful summer r?o far
on his claim.
John Paddock and wife are up from
the Baldwin and Paddock pile camp, t
and say they have been very success- f
ful In their business this year. v
A picked up team composed of cltl- d
zens nnd soldiers defeated n team of r
natives yesterday In a game of base 1
ball played on the Fort Seward din- n
mond. However, the natives got the c
Joke back, when thoy defeated a team r
of soldiers In a tug of war content. c
TRANSPORTATION MAN c
IS DEAD AT SEATTLE |
SEATTLE, July 7. ? Robert M. I
Boyd, general agent of the freight de
partment of the Milwaukee railroad
died hero yesterday.
Boyd was one of the best known j
transportation men in Seattle. He t
was a member of the Arctic and other ;
social clubs. He had many friends en- (
gaged in the transportation business.
t
OREGON RAILROAD BANDITS
CONFESS THEIR CRIME
PENDLETON, Ore., July 7.?Albert
Meadows, arrested at Ixiuisvllle, and
Clarence Stone, hrrested at Asotin,
Washington, today confessed that they
assisted In the Oregon-Washington
railway hold-up. They say the dead
bandit was Charles Manning, of Wy
oming. who carried a watch engraved
with Whitney's name.
MAN KILLS SELF BECAUSE
WIFE SPURNS HIS LOVE <
SEATTLE, July 7.?Failing in all
hlB efforts to efTect a reconcilliatlon
with his wife, Josoph Monohan, of San <
Francisco, committed suicide hem yes- (
terday. ,
i
FARMER DIES IN SEATTLE <
AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT >
SEATTLE, July 7.?M. L. Harrison, 1
a farmer, was killed here yesterday <
when his automobile went over an em
bankment.
? ? ? ? I
WARNING ? Parties taking skiff
from the float at Douglas city dock
last week are hereby given notice to
return the same as they are known.? '
7-7-2L J
ROOSEVELT HOPES
TO BREAK SOUTH
OYSTER BAY, July 7.?That Col.
Theodore Roosevelt continued to cher
ish the hope that he can break the
solid South was evidenced last night
when the statement was given out
Lhat ho has promised to make a speech
it New Orleans some time next month.
Col. Roosevelt thinks that the dis
satisfaction In Louisiana over the re
action of the tariff on sugar will serve
to give him support in that State, ac
cording to those who have conferred
with him.
8agamore Gates Closde.
OYSTER BAY. Nil Y., July 7.?The
gate leading to Sagamore hill has been
jarred for the first time in years. Col.
Theodore Roosevelt hns determined to
carry out the direction of his physi
cians to the letter, and take a com
plete rest
Whitman Is "Rubber Stamp."
OYSTER BAY, N. Y., July 7.?Ex
plaining his change of mind with ref
erence to the proposed Progressive
?ndorsement of District-Attorney Chas
3. Whitman for Governor of New
Tork, Col. Roosevelt said that It was
luo to the discovery that William
James, Jr., Is for Whitman, and that
-turned would make a "rubber stamp"
>f him.
LANE MAY NOT
COME TO ALASKA
WASHINGTON, July 7.?Secretary
?f the Interior Franklin K. Lane said
odny that he Is undecided as to
vhcther or not ho can visit Alaska
his summer He said that he felt the
iccesslty of remaining at Washington
o urge the passage of bills providing
or tho opening of the Alaska coal
lelds through the leasing system, and
or the development of Its water sites,
le said If these bills pass before Aug
ist 15 ho will make the trip, other
rise he will probably not do so.
CHICAGO LOOKS FOR
BUSINESS TO IMPROVE
???
CHICAGO, July 7?Chicago mer
hants are becoming more hopeful as
o business conditions, based on the
resent crop prospects.
Kansas Has Record Crop.
TOPEKA, Kan., July 7.?Tho Kan
as board of agrlculturo estimates
hat Kansas will raise 180,000,000
ushels of wheat, or 03,000,000 more
han Inst year, and 81,000,000 more
han the largest crop ever previously
arvested.
Good Times Coming.
WASHINGTON, July 7?President
i'oodrow Wilson said yesterday that
lie passage of the anti-trust bills will
tart a. boom in business. . He is con
Inced that a great deal of the "cal
mlty" talk has been the result of a
eslre to cause Congress to adjourn
without acting on tho anti-trust mess
res.
congress is after
shipping trust
WASHINGTON, July 7.?As a result
f tho facts established by the Shlp
Ing Tnist investigation the House
ommlttee on merchant marine and
Isheries has prepared a bill for the
egulntion by the Interstate Commerce
tammlsslon of the foreign and domes
Ic merchant marine.
The general purpose of tho bill Is to
ilaco water shipping under the super
islon of tho Interstate Commission,
hat It may be regulated in the man
ler of the railroad. In order that the
ommisslon may be able to handle
he amount of new business that 1b ex
acted to result from tho supervision
if the water traffic, the bill provides
hat tho number of commissioners
hall be increased from seven to elev
n.
jLAFLIN creditors to
be paid in full
NEW YORK, July 7.?It Is said by
hose who hnve Investigated Its af
alrs that tho H. B. Claflln company
vill pay Its creditors 100 cents on the
lollar. John Clnflln has put his entire
irlvato fortune of $10,000,000 behind
he company, and Is giving his person
l attention to straightening out the
:ompany'B affairs. The company will
lot re-enter business but will close
?ut entirely.
Manufacturers who were creditors
if the concern say that their chief
oss on account of the failure will not
le the delay In the payment of their
iccounts, but the dlsarangement of the
llstrlbutlon of their products.
Bliss Succeeds Clafln.
NEW YORK. July 7.?Cornelius M.
Hiss has been elected president of
he United Dry Goods, and Associated
ilcrchnnts companies, succeeding John
Claflln.
?JEW HAVEN INVESTIGATION
TO BE LONG AFFAIR
WASHINGTON, July 7. ? Counsel
Tcseph W. Folk, for the Interstate
Commerce Commission, says It will
ake six months to complete the exam
nation and determine upon the plan
>f the New Hnvcn investigation. Up
in the report of the examiners depends
he scope of the investigation. J. P.
Morgan and company will produco all
ho books and documents they have
or the Inspection of the examiners.
SEATTLE CHAMBER WANTS
TO GET INFORMATION
The Alaska Burenu of the Seattle
Chamber of Commerce Is seeking ln
'ormatlon as to commercial, religious
ind social organizations of various
dnds in Alaska. The current number
)f the New Seattle Chamber of Com
merce Record says that the Alaska
Bureau is receiving many Inquiries
;onceming such organizations in the
rerrltory.
FREE TRIP?
To San Francisco Panama Exposi
tion If you buy your drugs from the
Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front st, phone
Z60. 6-22-tf
? *
HUERTA WINS
HIS ELECTION
MEXICO CITY, July 7.?In the elec
tions hold In those sections of Mexi
co that are under Huerta's control
Sunday, Gen. Huerta was again elect
ed President of Mexico. War Minister
Blanquet was elected Vice-President.
Huerta controls the new Congress.
Huerta And Zapata May Join.
VERA CRUZ, July 7.?It is report
ed here that Gen. Huerta and Gen.
Zapata will soon form an alliance to
oppose the advance of Gen. Villa.
+ +
|+ FREDDIE WEL8H +
+ DEFEATS RITCHIE +
+ +
* LONDON, July 7. ?Freddie +
+ Welsh, English champion light- +
+ woight, was given a decision on +
+ points over Willie Ritchie, +
+ American champion, at the end +
+ of the 20th round in today's +
+ fight. ?
HOUSE OF LORDS AMENDS
IRISH HOME RULE BILL
LONDON, July 7.?The Houso of
Lords amended the home rule bill,
excluding Ulster from its operations 1
for six years and permitting Ulster (
counties to vote upon the question
every six years thereafter, and then j
passed the bill.
The bill now goes back to the House
of Commons. If the latter concurs in
the amendments, the bill will become
effective at once. Otherwise it will <
come back to the Lords again, and |
eventually become a law irrespective i
of what action they may take. .
MRS. JESSUP GIVES
$8,000,000 TO CHARITY
NEW YORK, July 7.?Mrs. Maria
De Witt Jessup, widow of Morris K.
Jessup, left $8,460,000 to public and 1
charitable institutions, mado cash be
quests of $3,866,000 to her relatives,
friends, and employees, and divided
the residuary estate between Thomas
De Witt Cuyler, her nephew, and
Eleanor De Graft Cuyler, her niece.
The largest bequest was $5,000,000 to
the American Musenm of Natural His
tory.
? ? ? i
MAYOR'S ASSAILANT
DIES OF INJURIES
BUTTE. Mont. July 7?Eric lu
tein. the Finnish miner who was shot
In the encounter with Mayor L. U. '
Duncan last Friday evening, died here :
of his wound yesterday evening. He
stabbed the Mayor three times and 1
the latter shot him In return.
? t i (
CHAMBERLAIN HONORED !
BY ENGLISH PEOPLE
BIRMINGHAM, Eng.. July 7.?Jos
eph Chamberlain was buried here yes
terday. Services were held for him
In various partB of the kingdom at |
the same hour. The Cabinet and two :
houses of Parliament held services at ,
Westminster Abbey.
ATTEMPT MADE TO
KILL DR. CARMEN |
FREEPORT, N. Y., July 7.?Dr. Ed
ward Carman, in whose offlce Mrs.
LouIbo Bailey, of Brooklyn, was shot
and killed last week, was shot at three
times yesterday as he drove through
the town of Baldwin.
SUCCE8S KILLED CANADIAN
POLITICIAN AND FARMER
GUELPH. Ont, July 7.?Whon he ,
heard that hlB candidate, Sam Carter |
In whose committee room he was at |
tho time, had won n by-election to par- ,
ltament, John Black, an aged farmer
who took great Interest In politics,
dropped dead.
"AMERICA'* MAY MAKE
SIXTY MILES AN HOUR
NEW YORK. July 7? Lieut. John ]
Cyril Porte and Glenn H. Curtiss be
lieve that the flying boat America will
he able to sustain a speed of 60 miles 1
an hour in the flight from New Found
land to the Azores.
METHODIST PUBLISHER
DIES IN VIRGINIA
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 7?W. B. Pal- 1
more, editor and publisher of the
Christian Advocate, of this place, a
Methodist religious publication, died
at Richmond, Va., yesterday.
CHINA BOY GOES TO
PRISON TO SPEND LIFE
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C., July
7.?John Kong, the 17-year-old China
boy who had killed and burned the
body of Mrs. Charles Millard at Van- i
couver whose servant he was, enter
ed the provincial penitentiary yester
day to serve a life sentence.
PARIS BOURSE SHOWS
DECLINE IN BUSINESS
PARIS, July 7.?A renewal of stag
nation Is being shown on the Paris
Bourse, accompanied' by a hesitating
tendency In prices.
? ? ?
LOST?Large sized envelope con
taining valuable papers on Front St,
15 o'clock, July 6th. Finder please re
turn to Miss Tracey, care Emprie. Re
wardo. ***lt.
LOS T?Vest pocket card case and
some transportation papers. Finder
please return to Triangle Saloon and.
receive reward. W. H. BImmerman.?
7-6-tf.
Huerta's Troops Meeting
And Threaten funston
WASHINGTON, July 7. ? Cable
grams received today from Gen. Fred
erick Funston convey the Information
that there is mutiny among the troops
of Gen. Huerta. The troops at the
outposts in front of Vera Cruz have
refused to obey their officers, and their
commanders have notified Gen. Fun
ston to be prepared as they have
threatened to attack the American
forcre8.
80 British Subjects Departing.
VERA CRUZ. Mex.. July 7.?Eighty
British subjects?60 men and 30 wom
en and children?arriving here Fri
day, will leave today for Jamaica
where they will be retained at the ex
pense of the British government un
til peace shall have been restored in
Mexico.
Huerta's Family Leaving.
VERA CRUZ, Mex., July 7.?Huor
ta's two sons, daughters and his moth
er-in-law and Generals Joaquin and
Mans will arrive here July 11 enroute
on the Steamship Espague bound from
Puorto Mexico to Havre, France. It
is believed here that this means the
early abandonment of Mexico by Gen.
Huerta and those who have been clos
est to him in tho government.
Wilson Dislikes Huerta.
WASHINGTON, July 7.?President
Wood row Wilson, asked yesterday af
ternoon, concerning the report that
Gen. Huerta contemplates leaving
Mexico for Europe, said:
"Really, I can say nothing. I am
glad to say that I have not got his
lonfidencc."
SENATE CONFIRMS
RESERVE APPOINTMENTS
WASHINGTON, July 7?The United
States Senate has confirmed the ap
pointments of Charles S. Hamlin, A.
Caspar Miller and Harding to the re
serve banking board. The appoint
ment of Thomas D. Jcnes and Paul F.
Warburg were not acted upon.
Warburg Asks for Release.
WASHINGTON. July 7. ? Paul F.
Warburg, of Kuhn, Loeb and com
pany, New York, has requested Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson to withdraw his
nomination as a member of the re
serve board.
?k +
? To Investigate McAdoo.
NEW YORK, July 7.?A Washing
ton dispatch to the American says
the Senate banking committee will
Investigate tho relations between
Kuhn, Loeb & Co. and Secretary of
the Treasury William G. McAdoo, with
reference to financing of McAdoo tun
nels.
Bank to Quit Other Banks.
NEW YORK, July 7.?Members of
Kuhn, Loeb & Co. are understood to
inve decided to resign from the few
iirectorships they hold in national
mnks because of the clause in the
'ederal reserve act stipulating that no
Ilrector or officer of a member bank
:an accept any compensation from It
)utsfde of the regular director's fee
>r officer's salary.
BOMB MAY HAATE BEEN
FOR ROCKEFELLER
NEW YORK, July 7?Evidence has
been procured by the New York po
lice that tho bomb which exploded In
a Lexington avenue flat last week,
killing Arthur Caron and two others,
was intended for John D. Rockefeller.
Two of the dead were to have beon
tried at Tarrytown yesterday for their
alleged connection with demonstra
tions at that place.
HENRY FORD TO TALK
BUSINESS TO WILSON
WASHINGTON, July 7. ? Henry
Ford, of Detroit, the automobile manu
facturer, will take luncheon with Pres
ident Woodrow Wilson Thursday, and
liscuss business conditions in tho
country at large with him. This will
be another of the discussions the Pres
ident is having with big business men
r>f vnrious sections of the country.
W. J. BRYAN ANNOUNCES
WILLIAM'S RESIGNATION
WASHINGTON, July 7?Secretary
cf State William J. Bryan today an
nounced that the resignation of Geo.
Fred Williams, United States minister
to Greece, has been received and ac
cepted.
IRA NELSON MORRIS
MINISTER TO SWEDEN
WASHINGTON. July 7.?Ira Nel
son Morris, of Chicago, was yester
day nominated to be United States
minister to Sweden by President
Wood<-ow Wilson.
SEATTLE JOY RIDE VICTIM
SUCCUMBS TO INJURIE8
TACOMA, July 7?Miss Prewitt. of
Seattle, who was injured last week
when an automobile in which she and
other Seattle people were taking a
joy ride plunged over an embankment,
died here yesterday afternoon.
SOUTH AFRICAN FARMERS
TO TOUR AMERICA
LONDON, July 7.?Fifty-five South
African farmers are here on their way
to the United States and Canada to
make an extensive American tour to
study farming methods. Some of then)
will spend several months in Califor
nia to study fruit culture.
NEW SUPERINTENDENT
FOR THE SITKA SCHOOL
C. L. Johns, the newly appointed
superintendent for the Sheldon Jack
son industrial training school at Sitka,
Is aboard the Jefferson with his fam
ily enroute to his new post of duty.
Mr. Johns comes from Utah to Alas
ka.

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